96% of US users opt out of app tracking in iOS 14.5, analytics find

The_King

Level 8
Verified
Aug 2, 2020
381
It seems that in the United States, at least, app developers and advertisers who rely on targeted mobile advertising for revenue are seeing their worst fears realized: Analytics data published this week suggests that US users choose to opt out of tracking 96 percent of the time in the wake of iOS 14.5.

When Apple released iOS 14.5 late last month, it began enforcing a policy called App Tracking Transparency. iPhone, iPad, and Apple TV apps are now required to request users' permission to use techniques like IDFA (ID for Advertisers) to track those users' activity across multiple apps for data collection and ad targeting purpose

The change met fierce resistance from companies like Facebook, whose market advantages and revenue streams are built on leveraging users' data to target the most effective ads at those users. Facebook went so far as to take out full-page newspaper ads claiming that the change would not just hurt Facebook but would destroy small businesses around the world. Shortly after, Apple CEO Tim Cook attended a data privacy conference and delivered a speech that harshly criticized Facebook's business model.

 

Stopspying

Level 14
Verified
Jan 21, 2018
624
When such big players like Fakebook and 'industries' like the advertising one are involved they will seek out new ways to track people for similar purposes to what the means blocked by Apple were designed for. IMO ideally what Apple has done here could be a contributor to a more pleasant online experience, the history of the internet points to it probably only being a short-term improvement. I'm no fan of Apple, or the other 'Big Tech' companies, they have other less openly disclosed motives for instigating this move - including their quarrels with Fakebook, G**gle etc over other matters, but I hope this move wakes up more of the worlds internet users to what is really going on with our data.
 

Minimalist

Level 6
Oct 2, 2020
288
When such big players like Fakebook and 'industries' like the advertising one are involved they will seek out new ways to track people for similar purposes to what the means blocked by Apple were designed for.
AFAIK Apple technically doesn't block anything. They require apps to ask users for permission to track them and if user says No they should obey decision (something like do-not-track on internet). If app continue to track user despite they didn't get permission, Apple can remove such app from it's Store. Even if vendors find new ways of tracking users, they should not use them without permission or they risk being removed from store.
We'll see how Apple will control if apps really obey user's decision.
 

Stopspying

Level 14
Verified
Jan 21, 2018
624
AFAIK Apple technically doesn't block anything. They require apps to ask users for permission to track them and if user says No they should obey decision (something like do-not-track on internet). If app continue to track user despite they didn't get permission, Apple can remove such app from it's Store. Even if vendors find new ways of tracking users, they should not use them without permission or they risk being removed from store.
We'll see how Apple will control if apps really obey user's decision.
Yes, you phrased that better than I did.
 
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