Janl1992l

Level 13
Verified
Hey there. First of all, hope you all had a great weekend. I have a question and google isnt that usefull. Where is the different between aes and camellia? Tested both and got the same speed on both. On google i only found that they are equaly the same when it comes to security but AES is older and widly used and adapted. Has camellia any benefits over aes? I use perfect-privacy vpn and trying camellia atm. Is there any different between this two?
 

Mahesh Sudula

Level 16
Verified
Malware Tester
AES is pretty strong..Trust me..
Being from a ethical hacking background i pretty much vouch the fact that i have never succeded in cracking the AES Wlan networks
Next follows CCMP..based on AES but its 128 bit
Just use AES and disable WPS(Though turns on automatically)

Encryption algorithms have no role on speed whatsoever
CCMP-Counter mode cypher chain blocking message authentication code / AES- Advanced Encryption System
 

Janl1992l

Level 13
Verified
Hey, thanks for ur answer. I know aes is pretty much solid. But i want to know the different between aes and camellia.
 

Mahesh Sudula

Level 16
Verified
Malware Tester
Nobody knows the different? Is camellia so unknown? Would be nice to get some answers. :)
There are a variety of reasons why AES is more widely used:
  1. AES is a standard.
  2. AES has been vetted by cryptanalysts more extensively than Camellia. As a result, we can have greater confidence in the security of AES than in Camellia. Therefore, on the merits, there may be good reasons to choose AES over Camellia.
  3. AES is a government standard (FIPS). Government procurements may be required to comply with applicable government standards. Therefore, when selling to the government, AES may be required; if so, Camellia isn't an acceptable substitute.
  4. AES is a industry standard. No one will get fired for using AES. If (say) Apple uses AES, and AES gets broken, the newspaper headline won't be about Apple; it'll be about flaws in something everyone is using. On the other hand, if Apple uses Camellia and Camellia gets broken, the newspaper headline will be about why Apple took it upon themselves to deviate from industry standard practice and how that led to a security breach in their systems. Therefore, aside from its merits, there's an incentive to choose the industry standard.
  5. Camellia is patented. AES is unpatented and free for all to use, without patent encumbrances. Regardless of what licenses might be available, many people are a bit wary about any patented algorithm, due to uncertainty, IP risks, etc. If the unencumbered version is every bit as good, it's easier to use the unencumbered version. Also, it is possible that some open source crypto library developers may be less likely to implement Camellia, because of the potential patent situation or because of the reduced demand to the above factors, so standard crypto libraries are less likely to Camellia. Similarly, many standards bodies have a bias against patent-encumbered algorithms, when there are alternatives that are every bit as good; therefore, some standards bodies may be less likely to use Camellia when they standardize on network protocols that require crypto.
  6. AES is entrenched. AES is a brand name that is widely known and recognized. Also, AES is good enough. Camellia is newer, and the benefits of Camellia are unclear or not as well known. (In many contexts, Camellia has no obvious advantages, so a developer might not see any reason to adopt it instead of AES, if they already know and trust AES and consider AES adequate for their needs.) There's no shortage of other block ciphers out there that could be considered, but if AES is good enough, there's not much incentive to use them.
 

Janl1992l

Level 13
Verified
There are a variety of reasons why AES is more widely used:
  1. AES is a standard.
  2. AES has been vetted by cryptanalysts more extensively than Camellia. As a result, we can have greater confidence in the security of AES than in Camellia. Therefore, on the merits, there may be good reasons to choose AES over Camellia.
  3. AES is a government standard (FIPS). Government procurements may be required to comply with applicable government standards. Therefore, when selling to the government, AES may be required; if so, Camellia isn't an acceptable substitute.
  4. AES is a industry standard. No one will get fired for using AES. If (say) Apple uses AES, and AES gets broken, the newspaper headline won't be about Apple; it'll be about flaws in something everyone is using. On the other hand, if Apple uses Camellia and Camellia gets broken, the newspaper headline will be about why Apple took it upon themselves to deviate from industry standard practice and how that led to a security breach in their systems. Therefore, aside from its merits, there's an incentive to choose the industry standard.
  5. Camellia is patented. AES is unpatented and free for all to use, without patent encumbrances. Regardless of what licenses might be available, many people are a bit wary about any patented algorithm, due to uncertainty, IP risks, etc. If the unencumbered version is every bit as good, it's easier to use the unencumbered version. Also, it is possible that some open source crypto library developers may be less likely to implement Camellia, because of the potential patent situation or because of the reduced demand to the above factors, so standard crypto libraries are less likely to Camellia. Similarly, many standards bodies have a bias against patent-encumbered algorithms, when there are alternatives that are every bit as good; therefore, some standards bodies may be less likely to use Camellia when they standardize on network protocols that require crypto.
  6. AES is entrenched. AES is a brand name that is widely known and recognized. Also, AES is good enough. Camellia is newer, and the benefits of Camellia are unclear or not as well known. (In many contexts, Camellia has no obvious advantages, so a developer might not see any reason to adopt it instead of AES, if they already know and trust AES and consider AES adequate for their needs.) There's no shortage of other block ciphers out there that could be considered, but if AES is good enough, there's not much incentive to use them.
Hey, thanks for ur answer. :) I will switch to aes again. That was helpful. :)