upnorth

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A lawsuit filed against BitTorrent owner Rainberry Inc, TRON Foundation's Justin Sun, and one of his colleagues, is based in employment law. However, the allegations it contains could pique interest in Hollywood, with claims that movies including The Lion King were involved in a "fraudulent scheme" to "make a profit from the illegal piracy of those materials."

In 2018, Justin Sun’s Rainberry Inc. successfully acquired BitTorrent Inc. While the name Rainberry is rarely used in public, company brands such as BitTorrent, TRON, and TRX are more easily recognized by the public, with controversy rarely far behind. Developments related to these various brands are usually followed closely by the cryptocurrency press, mainly due to Sun’s voluminous tweets that tend to focus on crypto matters, rather than the file-sharing activities of the uTorrent owner. This was also the case yesterday when sites including Coindesk began reporting on an employment law dispute that was quietly filed last October by a pair of former Rainberry Inc. employees. However, this development also has an interesting copyright angle that hasn’t been explained in detail.

Richard Hall worked as a product manager at the company while Lukasz Juraszek was employed as an engineer, at least before they were dismissed. Their 70-page lawsuit is a trip through many serious allegations, including racism, threats, the witnessing of physical violence, and a number of closely related matters. However, concerns over Rainberry’s exposure to copyright infringement issues appear to lie at the root of the legal action. “Defendant Justin Sun and his hand-picked mainland Chinese-born subordinates were engaged in illegal piracy of copyrighted materials for defendant Rainberry Inc., in order to make a profit from the illegal piracy of those materials, as well as other illegal and unscrupulous activities,” the lawsuit reads.
 

RejZoR

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Blaming Bitorrent company for piracy is like blaming Audi for people running over other people using their cars. Movie industry (or any other for that matter) has always been super salty about piracy and accused bunch of people where you're like, how does this make any sense, it's not like they are distributing or encouraging, they just make the app. Making up doesn't mean endorsement by default. Especially since Torrent protocol is used to share large files in general. Humble Bundle is using it to share legit free games, pretty much all Linux distributions use it etc.