Best SSD Brand?

  • Total voters
    56

tonibalas

Level 40
Verified
Trusted
I have installed on my old laptop the Samsung EVO 850 for over 2 years now.
The increase of speed will give you a big smile.
It has 5 years warranty and i am using it in SATA II connection,if you have SATA III you will take the full advantage of the SSD.
So far this SSD is running very good without any decrease in performance ( i tested last month and disk health is 100% ).
That's great for me because i always install and uninstall software and i was concerned that this behaviour will cause
problem much sooner that i was expected.
A second good choice would be Corsair.
Some of my friends are using it and they are very happy with its performance. Also Corsair is cheaper than Samsung.
 

Maxxx58

Level 13
I have installed on my old laptop the Samsung EVO 850 for over 2 years now.
The increase of speed will give you a big smile.
It has 5 years warranty and i am using it in SATA II connection,if you have SATA III you will take the full advantage of the SSD.
So far this SSD is running very good without any decrease in performance ( i tested last month and disk health is 100% ).
That's great for me because i always install and uninstall software and i was concerned that this behaviour will cause
problem much sooner that i was expected.
A second good choice would be Corsair.
Some of my friends are using it and they are very happy with its performance. Also Corsair is cheaper than Samsung.
Is there any way to check SATA type on my computer? Thanks for your detailed recommend
 

Spawn

Administrator
Verified
Staff member
May I ask you those who pick Samsung, why would you use then after the phone drama that taken place last year?
They have different divisions within the company... You think your SSD might explode too? :rolleyes:

Based on the company’s own investigation and independent scientific analysis of the issues by three consulting bodies, the overheating was caused by separate problems in batteries sourced from two different suppliers.

In the case of batteries sourced from Samsung SDI, there wasn’t enough room between the heat-sealed protective pouch around the battery and its internals. In the worst scenarios, that caused electrodes inside each battery to crimp, weaken the separator between the electrodes, and cause short circuiting.1

In the case of batteries sourced from Amperex Technology Limited, some cells were missing insulation tape, and some batteries had sharp protrusions inside the cell that led to damage to the separator between the anode and cathode. The batteries also had thin separators in general, which increased the risks of separator damage and short circuiting.
Source: Samsung Finally Reveals Why the Note 7 Kept Exploding