Advice Request Corsair AX760 ATX Full Modular vs XFX Pro 750W Black Edition Full Modular

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MiguelPratas819

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Jul 8, 2015
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Hey guys just as the title says which one is the best (Corsair PSU's vs XFX PSU's) and comparison of this specific PSU´S
Note: Hope this is not the wrong section
 
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Digerati

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I normally would say the EVGA because Corsair does not live up to the stellar reputation it earned in the past with some of their products. That said, the AX line of Corsairs are still top notch. However, that particular Corsair is an 80 PLUS "Platinum" where the EVGA is a "Gold". That's only a 2 - 3% efficiency gain with the Platinum but over time, it can add up. And Newegg is currently selling the Corsair for the same price (with the $20 rebate). So as long as it has the necessary connectors you need, I say go for the Corsair.
 

MiguelPratas819

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I normally would say the EVGA because Corsair does not live up to the stellar reputation it earned in the past with some of their products. That said, the AX line of Corsairs are still top notch. However, that particular Corsair is an 80 PLUS "Platinum" where the EVGA is a "Gold". That's only a 2 - 3% efficiency gain with the Platinum but over time, it can add up. And Newegg is currently selling the Corsair for the same price (with the $20 rebate). So as long as it has the necessary connectors you need, I say go for the Corsair.
Wait, XFX=Evga or did you mistaken xfx for evga or you simply added it to the list? I'm quite noob when it comes to PSU´s.
 
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Digerati

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:oops: Doh! Sorry. You are right. :confused: I did mean EVGA - they are my preferred supplies as of late. Sorry about that. However, I have to say I have used XFX power supplies too and have no complaints.

That said, I was correctly comparing the Corsair against the XFX. So my Platinum vs Gold comments still apply.
 

MiguelPratas819

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Jul 8, 2015
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:oops: Doh! Sorry. You are right. :confused: I did mean EVGA - they are my preferred supplies as of late. Sorry about that. However, I have to say I have used XFX power supplies too and have no complaints.

That said, I was correctly comparing the Corsair against the XFX. So my Platinum vs Gold comments still apply.
Thank you explaining man so Corsair is better in this case ok :D
 
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SHvFl

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Corsair AX line is top but so is the Xfx model you have chosen. Just go with the cheaper.
 
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Amelith Nargothrond

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I replaced 3 AX series PSUs just last year, in 2 different PCs, both with stabilizers. All 3 ended like smoking cannons. Sorry to always be the party pooper. These were mine, so it hurt :p I think they messaged each other to burn out at (almost) the same time (within a few months), after the warranty expired. Maybe it was a bad batch or something. Anyway, they were protected by the stabilizers, so it wasn't an electric discharge that killed them (or other mains electricity issue).

Went back to the good old Sirtec (HighPower). Sh*tty website, relatively cheap, Chinese, but damn they hold. The one in my pfsense box is running for 5 years and counting.

I'd definitely choose any other brand :p
 
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SHvFl

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I replaced 3 AX series PSUs just last year, in 2 different PCs, both with stabilizers. All 3 ended like smoking cannons. Sorry to always be the party pooper. These were mine, so it hurt :p I think they messaged each other to burn out at (almost) the same time (within a few months), after the warranty expired. Maybe it was a bad batch or something. Anyway, they were protected by the stabilizers, so it wasn't an electric discharge that killed them (or other mains electricity issue).

Went back to the good old Sirtec (HighPower). Sh*tty website, relatively cheap, Chinese, but damn they hold. The one in my pfsense box is running for 5 years and counting.

I'd definitely choose any other brand :p
But they have a 7 year warranty and i think they got released after 2010 so how could they die after the warranty? Maybe i remember the release date wrong but anw, if they last me 7 years and they die without killing any other hardware i am happy to replace them. With a price of $150 it's not even $2 per month.
 
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Amelith Nargothrond

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But they have a 7 year warranty and i think they got released after 2010 so how could they die after the warranty? Maybe i remember the release date wrong but anw, if they last me 7 years and they die without killing any other hardware i am happy to replace them. With a price of $150 it's not even $2 per month.

You're right. Just got a look at my warranty papers online (we have a very nice online shop that keeps all your paperwork in your account called "emag"), they are not AX series, but CX series (3 years warranty). Sorry guys... :) Anyway, still don't trust the brand anymore :p
 

SHvFl

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You're right. Just got a look at my warranty papers online (we have a very nice online shop that keeps all your paperwork in your account called "emag"), they are not AX series, but CX series (3 years warranty). Sorry guys... :) Anyway, still don't trust the brand anymore :p
Yeah, they CX models are their bad models. All reputable manufactures this days have bad and good models so it really doesn't matter which manufacturer you pick, you just have to pick the correct power supply.
 

Amelith Nargothrond

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Yeah, they CX models are their bad models. All reputable manufactures this days have bad and good models so it really doesn't matter which manufacturer you pick, you just have to pick the correct power supply.

Indeed, but they were like programmed to burn out right after the warranty. They could've least stay alive for another year :p I so very much hate this.
 
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Digerati

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Yeah, it use to be if it said Corsair on the label, you could trust it. But they started cutting corners and living on their name with their entry level models, which include the VS and CX lines. I generally stay away from them but will make exceptions with the RM, HX and AX lines.

Sadly, I've had quality consistency problems with some of their cases too. I bought two Carbide 300r mid towers. One was just fine. But the second was not "true" - that is, the sheet metal bends were not exactly 90° so the case wobbled sitting only on 3 feet at a time. Besides being annoying, it can suggest undue strain is being placed on a mounted motherboard at the mount points. It also had a couple knuckle scraping rough sheet metal edges where they were not finished properly. :( Both those issues should have been caught in quality control inspections before leaving the factory, IMO.

I have never had any problems with any of their RAM.
 

MiguelPratas819

Level 2
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Jul 8, 2015
80
I replaced 3 AX series PSUs just last year, in 2 different PCs, both with stabilizers. All 3 ended like smoking cannons. Sorry to always be the party pooper. These were mine, so it hurt :p I think they messaged each other to burn out at (almost) the same time (within a few months), after the warranty expired. Maybe it was a bad batch or something. Anyway, they were protected by the stabilizers, so it wasn't an electric discharge that killed them (or other mains electricity issue).

Went back to the good old Sirtec (HighPower). Sh*tty website, relatively cheap, Chinese, but damn they hold. The one in my pfsense box is running for 5 years and counting.

I'd definitely choose any other brand :p
From Cx from Ax goes a huge quality difference but I get your point :D BTW did that Cx series PSU's damaged any other component?
 
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Amelith Nargothrond

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From Cx from Ax goes a huge quality difference but I get your point :D BTW did that Cx series PSU's damaged any other component?

Unfortunately yes. On one of the PCs the USB controller got damaged. Partially. Random disconnects of the plugged-in devices, slow charging, "unrecognized usb device" errors and so forth. Got another mobo around and replaced it.

Don't get me wrong, I don't hate Corsair per se, they're manufacturing other good stuff, but there are plenty of other manufacturers out there to choose from. So why not, if one fails you? :)

I got my fixtures for consumer grade PCs:
CPUs: Intel fan
Memories: Kingston, Samsung
SSD: Samsung 850 Pro
HDD: HGST or WD Blacks
Mobo: Intel, EVGA, Asus, Gigabyte
Video: EVGA, Asus, Gigabyte
PSU: Sirtec HighPower, Seasonic
USB Flash Drives: Samsung, Kingston
Cases: whatever looks good and medium priced
Keyboards: Dell
Mouse: Logitech
Networking equipment: Asus, HP, Ubiquiti, Allied Telesis, Cisco
NAS: Synology
Printers: HP, Samsung, Xerox, Kyocera, Brother
Laptops: only Lenovo Thinkpads
Sound: I'm an audiophile, so I am not getting into details (only if someone fancies a good talk about sound) :p
 
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Digerati

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Unfortunately yes. On one of the PCs the USB controller got damaged. Partially. Random disconnects of the plugged-in devices, slow charging, "unrecognized usb device" errors and so forth. Got another mobo around and replaced it.
The thing is with such situations is that it is really hard to determine if the PSU took out the connected device, or if whatever took out the PSU also took out the connected device. For example, a surge that was not sufficiently suppressed could make it through to the connected components. It is pretty rare for a failed PSU to take out the connected devices since the output voltages of these supplies are low voltage DC. But it can happen. Years ago, a client's eMachine's PSU went up in smoke and took out everything but [fortunately] the hard drive. The mobo, RAM, graphics were destroyed. So was the network adapter, which caused the network to crash. Not pretty but at least no data was lost and the network came back up after a server reboot.
Sound: I'm an audiophile, so I am not getting into details (only if someone fancies a good talk about sound)
My first love in consumer electronics was audiophile quality electronics and audio reproduction. I got into that before I got into computers and that was in the mid-70s! I recently started a debate on another forum about how worthless the integrated speakers put in monitors are - except, maybe, for Windows sounds. I brought it up because I am getting more and more frustrated by the fact it is getting harder and harder to find good monitors without integrated speakers. I feel they are a waste of money, not to mention bezel space.

I went so far as to drill holes in the hardwood floor/ceiling barrier between my computer room and the basement below to run wires for the rear surround speakers for my computer speakers (he types while listening to Skynyrd's "Gimme Three Steps" ;)).
 

Amelith Nargothrond

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It is pretty rare for a failed PSU to take out the connected devices since the output voltages of these supplies are low voltage DC.

Wasn't that rare, there are plenty of low cost PSUs out there and plenty of electricity problems. Back then, when I worked in a computer shop (which had its own department of technicians for warranty stuff and repairs - and I worked there), we had almost daily people coming in with the PCs they bought from us with these kind of issues. I mean it's rare if you count the number of PCs we sold and the number coming back with PSUs burning out stuff inside a PC (the ratio between these two). But overall, we had to deal with them almost daily. Just PSU issues, literally daily, and not just once a day.

Ok just phoned one of my buddies who works at my supplier's service center, these occur much less than in my time, he said in average like once or twice a week (and they sell like hell). Things have changed indeed. But I also might count in the fact that they don't sell garbage (back then, we did sell very cheap stuff).

I went so far as to drill holes in the hardwood floor/ceiling barrier between my computer room and the basement below to run wires for the rear surround speakers for my computer speakers

Can't beat the wire. No wireless (and so, digital) stuff can match the softness, warm sound of a classic-style analogue equipment. I didn't get there yet, but one day I am going to buy a pair of Sennheiser HD 800 S and a tube amp and a top quality DAC for it. I do have a very good DAC, but not good enough for a tube amp. I don't use surround speakers (I own one, a Logitech Z5500 - old, but it's back in its original packaging), as I like the pure, unaltered stereo sound of music (awesome for movies though). Replaced them with a two speaker/channel stereo studio setup. Not that good for movies, but for music it's heaven :)
 
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Digerati

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Well, been an IT tech for many years too. I am just saying it is easy to assume it is the failed PSU that takes out connected devices. But in most cases, if something in the computer is destroyed too it is some surge or spike that likely took out both the PSU and the connected devices. Now the PSU might be blamed for failing to stop the anomaly, but it is still the anomaly the deserves the ultimate blame.

Yes, the newer and better PSUs are much more fault tolerant and are better able to protect connected devices in the event the PSU fails. Fortunately, even the big name computer makers - for the most part - stopped using the cheapest PSUs they could find. But you are right, there are still plenty of low cost, low quality PSUs out there, and sadly, there are still many users who attempt to cut corners in the budget by buying the cheapest PSU they can find. But again, because computer PSUs output low voltage DC, a failed PSU typically (but not always) does not result in a cascade of destruction.

I note this is just one reason I recommend all computers be on a "good" UPS with AVR - automatic voltage regulation. A surge and spike protector is little more than a fancy and expensive extension cord.

To your Logitech Z-5500, I never did like the term "Digital Speaker". There is no such thing as a digital speaker. Sound is analog. Period! And speakers reproduce sound. And they do that by taking an analog signal and converting that to sound waves. And sound waves move through the air as analog waveforms. Not a bunch of 1s and 0s, highs and lows, or ons and offs. The only digital is in the signal processing circuits used to drive the analog final amplifiers that drive the speakers.

This is another example of marketing weenies coming up with confusing marketing terms that make no sense.

I have some decent computer speakers. But I don't pretend they are audiophile quality. I don't use them for "serious" concentrated listening. I go to my living room and home theater system for that. I note the best computer speakers typically cost around $400 for the ("self-powered") entire system. That generally includes 4 surround, 1 center and 1 subwoofer PLUS all the electronics and amplifiers stuffed into the subwoofer housing to drive them. And they do sound darn good.

But to put things into perspective, audiophiles on a tight budget might spend $400 for just the front left speaker
 
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Amelith Nargothrond

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To your Logitech Z-5500, I never did like the term "Digital Speaker". There is no such thing as a digital speaker. Sound is analog. Period!

I never said digital speaker. I said digital equipment. It's called a digital-to-analog converter (DAC), which converts the digital sound source (say, your mp3s, flacs stored in you pc/player etc. - digital format) and convert it to an analog signal, so that the speakers can reproduce it. There are $15 DACs, like a cheap sound card, and there are $15.000 DACs, which.. well lets just say they are very good.

The DAC is the first level of an audiophile's "chain of equipments", as the signal it produces will go further down the chain, being the first source of analog signal in the chain. A DAC processed (transformed) signal (the analog signal) will travel through the amp(s), which also alter the "sound", "adding" more current & voltage so that it can power the speakers or headphones. That's the second level. The third is the speakers/headphones itself, which transform current and voltage into vibrations of the speaker's membrane, vibrations (pressure waves) which moves the air around our eardrums, which mechanically move the bones inside our middle ear, which then gets converted into electrical nerve impulses and finally reaching our brain. So we as humans are the opposite of DACs, which is ADCs (analog to digital converters - more or less, we are mechanical to digital converters).

This whole process affects the way we perceive sound. That's what makes someone an audiophile or... not. A non-audiophile will "sense/hear" no difference between a $50 dollar "chain" or a $50.000 chain (outside being occasionally louder). So it's pointless for that person to buy expensive equipment (maybe just to show off).
 
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