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_CyberGhosT_

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Sure, and I also employ Macrium Reflect.
I use the restore points only just before the install of a new software,
or just before a Windows update, this will allow you to revert the changes
quickly if needed and save you many headaches.
With Macrium I have a HDD I clone to in the event of an infection I can
swap drives and re-clone in just 6 min. ;)
 
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One more question: What are the limitations of Windows System Restore?
AFAIK it does not make full partition backups, and so you can't revert 100% back to the point where the Windows System Restore Point is set...

When you, for example, install a program and don't like it or it doesn't work or is malware or whatever, and you restore to a previous taken Restore Point, can you be sure there is absolutly no leftover of the installed program?
 
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_CyberGhosT_

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Okay one more question: What are the limitations of Windows System Restore?
AFAIK it does not make full partition backups, and so you can't revert 100% back to the point where the Windows System Restore Point is set...

When you, for example, install a program and don't like it or it doesn't work or has malware or whatever, and you restore to a previous taken Restore Point, can you be sure there is absolutly no leftover of the installed program?
That would depend on where the Malware Resides, that is why I use Macrium and "not" restore points to recover from Malware ;)
With software, restore points will get rid of most the functional remnants, with only minimal clean up required after, such that Ccleaner or Revo could
clean up whats left with very little issue
 
That would depend on where the Malware Resides
Okay, maybe I should have formulated my question in a different way, because what I also would like to know:
How (un)common is it that installed software/malware has its leftovers when you make a system restore?
Does this (usually) just happen with really advanced malware you don't find often "in the wild", or is this much more common?
 

_CyberGhosT_

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Okay, maybe I should have formulated my question in a different way, because what I also would like to know:
How (un)common is it that installed software/malware has its leftovers when you make a system restore?
Does this (usually) just happen with really advanced malware you don't find often "in the wild", or is this much more common?
This can't be clearly answered given the varying nature of Malware, some infect regions of the OS that system restore has no or little impact on.
I knew what you were getting at, and i would err on the side of safety here and say "if" a user relied on System Restore to undo Malware they would often
Find leftovers due to where the infection may lay or attach itself.
For software it would be far less common to find much in the way of left overs, I hope that helps, and if not I step aside for others to respond.
 

JHomes

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In respect of this old post ;)

Windows System Restore and Macrium Reflect Free

RollBack Rx and Macrium Reflect Free

One more question: What are the limitations of Windows System Restore?
AFAIK it does not make full partition backups, and so you can't revert 100% back to the point where the Windows System Restore Point is set...

When you, for example, install a program and don't like it or it doesn't work or is malware or whatever, and you restore to a previous taken Restore Point, can you be sure there is absolutly no leftover of the installed program?
You never hear someone say "I restored from Ransomware with WSR". Mainly because, one of the first things Malware attacks are your Windows services. So your registry, and also Windows System Restore. So when you try to restore, most Ransomware or other trojans won't let you. I mean, Microsoft was dumb enough to leave the service in Windows. So there's nothing protecting it from a swift and painless death.

Depending on who you ask, disk imaging is the hot thing. If you want to maintain the speed of WSR and perhaps have a better alternative to WSR you may want to check out Snapshot tools like RollBack Rx (Review), AX64, or Comodo Time Machine.
 

JakeXPMan

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Does anyone recommend this:

EaseUS Todo Backup Home


Is there better backup software? I hear a lot of complaints of failure..., in cnet reviews anyway,
http://download.cnet.com/EaseUS-Todo-Backup-Free/3000-2242_4-10964460.html
http://download.cnet.com/EaseUS-Todo-Backup-Free/3000-2242_4-10964460.html
I would like to use something like this to backup system and recovery partition, not so much the data part of it.
http://download.cnet.com/EaseUS-Todo-Backup-Free/3000-2242_4-10964460.html
There's a full version of Todo Backup ending soon, https://malwaretips.com/threads/easeus-todo-backup-home-8-9.64328/#post-552775
if its not good I won't install it, so info wanted plz.

Would this program be able to create a system recovery type thing, like a copy of the "Factory Image" recovery option build into the D: partition?
 
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