giladfrid009

New Member
I'm surprised nobody mentioned Solus. It has a clean and user friendly interface, and the distro is very refined. This is the distro of my choice . Solus is a rolling release, but I never had any issues with it, and it's been very stable for me (and is considered stable among rolling release distros)
 

uduoix

Level 4
This is not comparable.
MX Linux is not a rolling release and it changes a lot.
MX Linux is based on Debian, probably one of the most stable Linux. In the International Space Station, they use Debian, certainly not Arch. A Debian-based distro is likely to be relatively stable thus.
Linux users choose Arch because they can install their OS, step by step, element by element, following their wish. They get to know how it works and once that's done, they know what's going under the hood.
For Arch users, Manjaro is the fast food of the gastronomy. A great dish, meticulous and delicate, requiring hours of preparation, reduced to industrialized, then frozen, packaged and reheated in the microwave 5 minutes.

A rolling release will break, inevitably. It's already happened with Manjaro and it will happen again. Advise a rolling release as a first distro is not a good advice IMO. Even a rolling release like Tumbleweed with a large and real professionals staff behind could and will break.
Ubuntu is based on Debian too and it is full of bugs and unstable and this is why it keep losing on popularity.
It doesn't matter if distro is rolling release or point release if developers know what they doing. It's all abount personal taste.
You are misleading users with your rolling release comments because they are not true. If it was true, Manjaro/Arch would't be so popular over last year and more. Updates can break system anytime, rolling or point release. I personally have better experience with rolling release distros, someone else otherwise.
 

Vasudev

Level 28
Verified
Ubuntu is based on Debian too and it is full of bugs and unstable and this is why it keep losing on popularity.
It doesn't matter if distro is rolling release or point release if developers know what they doing. It's all abount personal taste.
You are misleading users with your rolling release comments because they are not true. If it was true, Manjaro/Arch would't be so popular over last year and more. Updates can break system anytime, rolling or point release. I personally have better experience with rolling release distros, someone else otherwise.
It finally boils down to whether any distro installs fine at the end of the day. I tried installing Pop OS many times but it failed and installed Ubuntu 18 within minutes eventhough they are based off same kernel, apps etc..
 

0011

Level 1
GNOME sucks anyway.
Because..? Personally, I experience no problems with it on 3.30.x with Antergos on low-end laptop with i3-5005U, also, there are coming gnome shell improvements in 3.32.x wich is around corner. However, Manjaro's current gnome 3.30 lag with various things, like changing display brightness/volume, etc.

It all comes down to personal preference for each one, XFCE, LXQt, LXDE, MATE desktop environemnts are among lightest.
 
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Deckard

Level 1
Ubuntu is based on Debian too and it is full of bugs and unstable and this is why it keep losing on popularity.
You forgot to mention that Ubuntu is based on the unstable Debian branch, a small omission you do.
(and unstable Debian branch don't mean "instable OS" - it mean "less stable").


The DistroWatch ranking is "the number of visitors viewing individual distribution pages".
It's the 'curiosity' rank, nothing more, nothing less.

The 2017 Linux Laptop Survey Results by Phoronix

In 2017, DistroWatch / Manjaro page ranking. 3rd position. The curiosity position.
Now, on the real life, a survey with 30,171 response, ..... Manjaro, 23rd position.

If we include the servers (Linux run on 96.5% fo the servers in the world), ie Fedora, CentOS, Debian, Suse, etc; Manjaro is ultimately a tiny 'niche' on the Linux market.
A soooooo tiny niche ! :D
(keep cool, I'm teasing you).


Yes, Solus is a really good rolling release Linux for a beginner, imo. Fast, clean, stable for what I tested months ago.
 

Local Host

Level 14
Verified
It went from personal opinions to a popularity contest which doesn't help OP at all. It doesn't matter which distro is most popular, doesn't make it the best.

Just grab whatever distros you think fit your requirements and test them over LiveCD (USB), is useless to argue which one is best.

Gnome is the last environment one without Linux experience wants to use, KDE is more friendly but can also be heavy on the resources, which leaves us with KFCE which brings the friendly nature of KDE with lightweight resource usage.

So whatever distro you choose, go with KFCE as environment.
 
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Deckard

Level 1
It went from personal opinions to...
Yes, I agree. That's why I recommended the video from Luke Smith
How to choose a Linux distro: Stop Thinking!

What is painful in Linux is this constant war between distributions, with the fan boys etc.
It is not because someone appreciates his distro that one has to advise it systematically on every opportunity.


You mean XFCE.
 
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mlnevese

Level 14
Verified
Fanboys are a disservice to whatever they are a fan to. OS, security software, phone brands, you name it. The more rabid they are the more they drive away people that are curious about whatever they are a fan of.

The amount of times I see "go research it" as an answer to any question in Linux forums instead of just answering the question or pointing to places where the answer may be found is astonishing. I don't care if it has been answered 1000 times. Have you ever tried searching for "sound does not play in xxxx linux distro" on Google? There are thousands of answers and they may not apply at all to the person who is asking. This unfriendly attitude from some members of the Linux community keeps many people who would use Linux way.

Answering the OP I would download let's say the top 5 distros in distro watch and test them for a month at least. Use whichever you think is most friendly and simpler to use and gives you the least amount of headache. The same as security software actually :)
 

shmu26

Level 76
Content Creator
Trusted
Verified
Use Linux Mint Cinnamon.
Mint is easier to use than plain Ubuntu, and the support forum is also easier to survive.
Cinnamon desktop is pretty similar to Windows desktop, and works very well.
Stay away from Manjaro. It is for tinkerers, not for people looking for an easy user experience.
All Linux distros are light, you don't have to worry about that.

The three I tried recently are Ubuntu, Manjaro, and Mint Cinnamon.

It is great that there are lots of distros, that's the whole Linux experience -- it's your OS, not the corporations's OS. But the easiest place to start is Linux Mint Cinnamon. After you get comfortable with Linux, you can switch to the distro of your choice, if you so wish.
 

BoraMurdar

Community Manager
Staff member
Verified
I have dual core Celeron laptop with 2GB DDR2 RAM and an SSD... Believe me, if you want a comfortable experience you go with Lubuntu, Solus, Kubuntu or Mint... Even Mint and Kubuntu may seem heavy in some situations... Just 2GB is meant for 32bit OSes but if you want Chromium on Linux you'll need a 64bit OS ( which works on 2GB of RAM with proper CPU architechture but still...)
 

Upendra19

Level 1
I have dual core Celeron laptop with 2GB DDR2 RAM and an SSD... Believe me, if you want a comfortable experience you go with Lubuntu, Solus, Kubuntu or Mint... Even Mint and Kubuntu may seem heavy in some situations... Just 2GB is meant for 32bit OSes but if you want Chromium on Linux you'll need a 64bit OS ( which works on 2GB of RAM with proper CPU architechture but still...)
Will Solus run fine on my 64 bit OS, 2GB DDR3, Pentium dual core laptop as you said mint maybe heavy in some situations.
 

misterman2100

New Member
Thanks to all for their suggestions. I tried puppy linux first to feel linux:ROFLMAO:. But now i have installed two linux mint and solus.:giggle:
If you do have an eventual slow-down or something doesn't feel right, I highly recommend Q4OS. I had it installed on an ancient HP Pavilion laptop circa 2005 and it strummed along nicely! Lubuntu, too, worked fairly well, although I did not have as much success with LXLE. Just a few items for consideration! Good luck with Mint and Solus! Gotta find things that work for you!
 

bunchuu

Level 7
Verified
solus, linux lite and most of other members has mentioned are good choice but in my experience, I'm using zorin in my secondary laptop and my wife can use it. She even didn't realized it's linux (not windows) :cool::cool: