shmu26

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I've been running Windows 7 on this hardware since mid-2016. Host is still win7x64, but just today installed guest w10pro_v1903. Install of w10 vm very smooth and seems to be running great. I've been reading all the suggested what_to_do's to harden w10, now to put it into practice. I think I'm doing ConfigureDefender first. Seems like the ms security on w10 is good once you tweak it. And Ubuntu 18.04 vm has been aok too, although preliminarily it seems that Ubuntu might be lacking some security related apps I was expecting to find in Linux. I'm just having fun playing with vm :) I get away with running LibreOffice for work (a non-profit so budget is sometimes tight) I see MX Linux is No. 1 at distrowatch. why is it tops? short answer only, I'm too easily confused, eg, how much better or different can it be from Ubuntu??
Distrowatch mainly reflects the latest fads among linux distrohoppers.
Nevertheless, MX Linux runs extremely fast and light, to the point that it can even make antique machines usable again. Some people -- such as myself -- really dig the default xfce desktop, the way it is tweaked and customized out-of-the-box in MX. Also, MX has certain unique tools and features not found in other distros. For instance, the software center includes popular non-FOSS apps, such as Google Chrome and Dropbox, and it makes the installation of complex apps such as VirtualBox totally easy. And you can make a live usb that is a clone of your installed system, and it is writable, with usb persistence.
 

simmerskool

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Distrowatch mainly reflects the latest fads among linux distrohoppers.
Nevertheless, MX Linux runs extremely fast and light, to the point that it can even make antique machines usable again. Some people -- such as myself -- really dig the default xfce desktop, the way it is tweaked and customized out-of-the-box in MX. Also, MX has certain unique tools and features not found in other distros. For instance, the software center includes popular non-FOSS apps, such as Google Chrome and Dropbox, and it makes the installation of complex apps such as VirtualBox totally easy. And you can make a live usb that is a clone of your installed system, and it is writable, with usb persistence.
sounds interesting. as I reacquaint myself with VM Workstation 15 I'll try MX as a guest. my recent experience of the past few days, helps when VM says the intended guest is fully supported (not sure that MX is listed as compatible?) but an informed user can probably bend it in. So far, I'm using Ubuntu 18.04 LTS more than w10 :) (both on the compatible list). I have Windows 7 host on display1 and ubuntu on display2 and seamlessly smooth sailing.
 

shmu26

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sounds interesting. as I reacquaint myself with VM Workstation 15 I'll try MX as a guest. my recent experience of the past few days, helps when VM says the intended guest is fully supported (not sure that MX is listed as compatible?) but an informed user can probably bend it in. So far, I'm using Ubuntu 18.04 LTS more than w10 :) (both on the compatible list). I have Windows 7 host on display1 and ubuntu on display2 and seamlessly smooth sailing.
If you are happy with Ubuntu LTS, stay with it. It is more stable and reliable than MX, and has broader sources of software. Ubuntu LTS is totally mainstream. MX is boutique, by comparison.
 

Handsome Recluse

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Most any Linux distro has low minimum hardware requirements. Puppy Linux is one I can recall off the top of my head. And it is reasonably well supported.

With Linux, don't stubbornly go with what you want and like. Instead go with what works. And use a distro that gets very active support and updates.

I don't particularly like GNOME, but KDE don't work on CentOS. And I don't insist on not using CentOS just because KDE don't work right. I just accept it, use GNOME and get on with it. Heck, I'm in the command line most of the time anyway.

A lot of users get caught up in the desktop and customization. They put tons of effort into it, it don't work and then they get upset, their frustration gets to them, and then abandon Linux.

Choose distros with regular support. Heck, Fedora, CentOS and Kali Linux are tops. So what if you don't need half the stuff on Kali ? Uninstall what you don't need and then leave it alone. Keep it updated. You'll be more happy in the end than doing the distro-hop dance.
CentOS as desktop is rather out there though. Curious what doesn't work on CentOS KDE.
 
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shmu26

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"Cuz they can. Also probably because it's highly supported and has a 10 year lifespan.
You can download it with GNOME 3/KDE 4.
All the official repositories contain really old packages though.
Thanks. Old packages sometimes work better than new ones, even though they have less features. But it sounds like there might be some driver problems with newer hardware...
 
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SeriousHoax

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For any beginners it's recommended to start with a Ubuntu based distro to understand and learn the basics. For desktop environment GNOME should be a hard no for low config pc. I don't even like GNOME tbh. Xubuntu, Lubuntu, Ubuntu Mate, Linux Mint etc are very light. Lubuntu is probably the lightest among these. Mx Linux looks great too. Highly customizable, based on Debian. Ubuntu is based on Debian too. After some distro hopping later I settled with Manjaro which is arch based of course. I can't really think of going back to any Ubuntu based distro anymore. I love Manjaro. It's perfectly stable on my system and being arch based makes everything more appealing to me. KDE is my favorite desktop environment so using Manjaro KDE. But like I said, any beginner should start with a Ubuntu based distro then later may try other things if he/she wishes.
 

shmu26

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The appeal of CentOS is its stability, which is up to Enterprise standards. But Mint is also very stable, and much better for desktop users. If you don't want hassles, you just want things to work, and to have a decent user experience, Mint is a very good choice. It is better than MX Linux in that respect.
 

bribon77

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The appeal of CentOS is its stability, which is up to Enterprise standards. But Mint is also very stable, and much better for desktop users. If you don't want hassles, you just want things to work, and to have a decent user experience, Mint is a very good choice. It is better than MX Linux in that respect.
I agree with you MX linux sometimes gets dumb. Mint or Ubuntu has more weight in the Linux world. and they also have more information by Internet.
 
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The problem with Linux distros is that the user-experience is all over the place. Even within the same distro, there is usually a wild range of user experiences. The Linux experience is much less uniform than Windows or MacOS. But hey, whatever. Linux distros give bored software addicts something to do.
 

simmerskool

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If you are happy with Ubuntu LTS, stay with it. It is more stable and reliable than MX, and has broader sources of software. Ubuntu LTS is totally mainstream. MX is boutique, by comparison.
ok thanks good to know. I ran centos6 on different hardware for years as fallback pc that was always ready to go. So far liking Ubuntu 18.04 LTS more than Windows 10 :unsure: I need to sharpen my linux skills
 

shmu26

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I need to sharpen my linux skills
We all do :)
One factor in choosing a distro is the support forum. The "AskUbuntu" forum is not a friendly place. If you can't formulate your question exactly the way they want, you can get into trouble over there. They will tell you nicely the first time, but...
The Linux Mint forum is much more friendly in that way, and Linux Mint is very similar to Ubuntu LTS, except that the default desktop is Cinnamon, which I personally like better than Gnome. So if you like experimenting, maybe try out Mint...

I have a multiboot setup:
MX Linux xfce
Linux Mint Cinnamon
Windows 10
 
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simmerskool

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We all do :)
One factor in choosing a distro is the support forum. The "AskUbuntu" forum is not a friendly place. If you can't formulate your question exactly the way they want, you can get into trouble over there. They will tell you nicely the first time, but...
The Linux Mint forum is much more friendly in that way, and Linux Mint is very similar to Ubuntu LTS, except that the default desktop is Cinnamon, which I personally like better than Gnome. So if you like experimenting, maybe try out Mint...

I have a multiboot setup:
MX Linux xfce
Linux Mint Cinnamon
Windows 10
Mint 19.2 was first linux installed on vm workstation, but it was buggy. maybe a bad install by me, but vmware states that Ubuntu 18.04 is compatible with workstation, and even the installation of Ub was acknowledged as "this will be easy" by workstation installer. w10 install ok too. Mint was crashing, perhaps because it was too new version?? :unsure:
 

shmu26

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Mint 19.2 was first linux installed on vm workstation, but it was buggy. maybe a bad install by me, but vmware states that Ubuntu 18.04 is compatible with workstation, and even the installation of Ub was acknowledged as "this will be easy" by workstation installer. w10 install ok too. Mint was crashing, perhaps because it was too new version?? :unsure:
I installed Mint 19.2 on my computer as soon as it came out, without problems, so I don't think your issues were caused because it was too new. I think it is more likely that the issues were related to running it in VMware. VMware is not very quick to adapt itself to new OSes.
What happens if you try to run Mint in VirtualBox? VirtualBox is more linux-oriented, I bet it will run well.
 

simmerskool

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I installed Mint 19.2 on my computer as soon as it came out, without problems, so I don't think your issues were caused because it was too new. I think it is more likely that the issues were related to running it in VMware. VMware is not very quick to adapt itself to new OSes.
What happens if you try to run Mint in VirtualBox? VirtualBox is more linux-oriented, I bet it will run well.
Yes I agree it was a vmware issue or me, good to know about virtualbox. I'll try it again. Used it years ago, then ran for years with no vm installed, and just starting with workstation. I'll look for some room on the hdd / ssd for virtualbox :)
 

shmu26

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Yes I agree it was a vmware issue or me, good to know about virtualbox. I'll try it again. Used it years ago, then ran for years with no vm installed, and just starting with workstation. I'll look for some room on the hdd / ssd for virtualbox :)
Virtualbox is lighter than VMware. And you can use your vmdk hard disk in a Virtualbox VM, without even converting it.