Nightwalker

Level 18
Verified
Content Creator
How is NordVPN unblocking Disney+? It might be through YOUR own computer. Even if you’ve never used Disney+ or NordVPN.


NordVPN, a company reeling from careless security practices revealed as part of a security breach (one that they covered up for 6 months until they were finally outed for it), had promised to do better.
From the NordVPN blog:
This is about explaining what we’re going to do to take our security to the next level and make sure nothing like that ever happens again…. We’ve learned our lesson and we want to prove it to you with actions, not just words…. What we can promise is that we have taken this incident to heart and will do everything we can to improve and to win back your trust.
That surely sounds nice, but is it true?
What I’m about to tell you is distressing, and reveals the true nature of NordVPN’s business practices.

Tesonet and Oxylabs
See the problem is, NordVPN is linked closely with a Lithuanian data mining company called Tesonet. NordVPN is said to be one of Tesonet’s projects, Oxylabs.io is another one.
So what’s the big deal? Oxylabs.io advertises on its website “32M+ residential proxies…100% anonymous proxies from all over the globe with zero IP blocking.” Think of “residential proxies” this way: 1.) Oxylabs installs some malware on to a user’s device, unknown to the user, by bundling it with other software that the user downloads. 2.)This malware enables Oxylabs to sell off your bandwidth, your computing power, and your IP address to third parties, who will route their internet traffic through your device.
Does that mean your device can be used by a third party to access child porn or hack into a bank? Absolutely! Another VPN provider named Hola was called out for reselling users’ bandwidth in this way through their B2B service (Luminati), and incidentally Hola is suing Tesonet for copying Hola’s technology.
NordVPN has gone out of their way to downplay their ties to Oxylabs and Tesonet. After all, they couldn’t possibly be incorporating any part of Oxylabs technology into NordVPN’s apps…


Full article:
 

Burrito

Level 22
Verified
Tesonet and Oxylabs
See the problem is, NordVPN is linked closely with a Lithuanian data mining company called Tesonet. NordVPN is said to be one of Tesonet’s projects, Oxylabs.io is another one.
That's just unbelievable.

A consumer buying strategy would be to buy a VPN service based a country that is amenable to civil penalties ---- consumer laws that allow them to be sued. NordVPN should be class-actioned out of existence. And even better... a country where this would have a criminal component, i.e. fraud...
 
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Nightwalker

Level 18
Verified
Content Creator
That's just unbelievable.

A consumer buying strategy would be to buy a VPN service based a country that is amenable civil penalties ---- consumer laws that allow them to be sued. NordVPN should be class-actioned out of existence. And even better... a country where this would have a criminal component, i.e. fraud...
I fully agree with that, Windscribe has a very good article about this:

How much faith are you willing to put into an offshore based VPN service, operated by seemingly anonymous individuals? With no personal responsibility, there is no accountability.

Russia, China and Saudi Arabia are not “Five Eyes” countries, would you be okay with using a VPN provider based there? Probably not.
 

Umbra

Level 21
Verified
A consumer buying strategy would be to buy a VPN service based a country that is amenable to civil penalties ---- consumer laws that allow them to be sued. NordVPN should be class-actioned out of existence. And even better... a country where this would have a criminal component, i.e. fraud...
if you don't want your country's intelligence agencies to have access to your VPN logs (if any), you better off with a VPNs based in a lawless country especially one unfriendly to your country. When using a VPN for serious privacy/anonymity, you don't care of consumer right, they don't apply to you since you aren't supposed to give any IDs.
 

rsonic

Level 2
if you don't want your country's intelligence agencies to have access to your VPN logs (if any), you better off with a VPNs based in a lawless country especially one unfriendly to your country. When using a VPN for serious privacy/anonymity, you don't care of consumer right, they don't apply to you since you aren't supposed to give any IDs.
And then they could just give the logs anyway. If it's serious privacy/anonymity, should you be handing the control to others?
 

Burrito

Level 22
Verified
if you don't want your country's intelligence agencies to have access to your VPN logs (if any), you better off with a VPNs based in a lawless country especially one unfriendly to your country. When using a VPN for serious privacy/anonymity, you don't care of consumer right, they don't apply to you since you aren't supposed to give any IDs.
I'm pretty good with my country's intelligence services taking a look at my stuff..... as terror and insurrection are not my thing.

I wouldn't like it, but I'm ok too with law enforcement looking at my stuff. I don't do criminal stuff.... in general.

I'm just seeking general privacy, killing ads, protecting against hackers, MiTM stuff... and other criminal intent. Especially with travel -- so using hotel and airport wifi.

When I saw the 'Wall of Sheep" at Black Hat.... that stuck with me. A scrolling board at DefCon/Black Hat with exposed logins & passwords shown in real time.

I'll stick with 5+ Eyes providers who can be trusted. A lawless country is much more likely to work with the 'other side' directly or indirectly.

In the event I elect to make a career change and go terrorist or criminal, I'll go with your advice.

Maybe I'd make a little more money.... 🤔🤐
 

Umbra

Level 21
Verified
And then they could just give the logs anyway.
What i meant is if i was American dissident/criminal, i won't use any American or its allies based VPN (say Australian) , i rather use a Chinese, Russian or else VPN, on top of my own Tor exit node if possible (for obvious reasons).

If it's serious privacy/anonymity, should you be handing the control to others?
By default, you can't control your public IP, it belong to your ISP. The Only way is replacing it via a VPN or TOR assigned one (at best) or your own proxy (At worst).
And indeed for serious privacy, only the user is responsible about what he exposes and tools he uses.
 

Jake Miguel

Level 3
Verified
Never ever buy Nord. I have cancelled their subscription last week. I have been reading a lot about them and they way of working. Will go on use another one. Btw Nord wasn't able to run Disney plus for me. I used the same VPN which I used for hulu to run Disney+.