idunno

Level 2
I know I posted an article asking if this is possible, but now I want to know how likely is it.
I read somewhere it is exetremly unlikely but that post was from 2013 and things could have changed.
So, how likely is it?

-Thanks!
 

bribon77

Level 29
Verified
Good: I like to try Malalwares. And the recommendation.
1 try in a virtual environment,
2 wear a vpn. Or disable Internet connection.
Ok, this is not for pleasure, if not why you can spread malware over the network.
 
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idunno

Level 2
Depending on the type of malware it is very likely, a lot of the ransomware family will spread across networks easily.
So is there some type of list of how likely is it for diffrent types?
Im not tallking about ransomeware
 

Slyguy

Level 43
I know I posted an article asking if this is possible, but now I want to know how likely is it.
I read somewhere it is exetremly unlikely but that post was from 2013 and things could have changed.
So, how likely is it?

-Thanks!
Not likely, at all.

The way malware spreads in a network is usually through shared drives and/or execution of programs on shared drives. For example we've seen some IT firms setup the document and desktop folders on individual PC's as shared drives in user folders on servers. The likelihood of a spreading infection in that case is pretty substantially increased. (especially since this usually means they didn't do permission limitations)

For a home network without a server or NAS and direct sharing of public folders in a workgroup the likelihood of an infection spreading is virtually zero. Remember, just because another PC is on the same network and you can ping it doesn't mean you can copy, execute or infiltrate that PC. (or malware doing that)

Generally the reason vlans and subnet segregation is used is to reduce potential hacking events moreso than anything to do with malware having magical capabilities to hop subnets. In a VLAN network environment, with multiple broadcast domains, network administrators have control over each port and user. A malicious user can no longer just plug their workstation into any switch port and sniff the network traffic using a packet sniffer. It's not done for malware reasons - generally.
 
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509322

The risk is low if the system sits behind a NAT router.

Also, the risk is low when you have the system connected directly to the internet (e.g. public wifi) since most firewalls will block incoming connections\stealth ports at maximum settings.

On the other hand, if you are using SMB, have a direct internet connection, misconfigured the firewall\enabled network discovery then there is a risk.

In general, for home users the risk is quite low.
 

Winter Soldier

Level 25
Likely or unlikely, it depends on the malware type you get infected

You consider that some malware search for critical vulnerabilities that may be present in computer networks, subject of the attack. To infect vulnerable computers, this malware sends a network packet (exploit), so the malicious code (or part of this code) is able to penetrate inside of the computer-victim, activating itself. If the network packet contains only a part of the code, once it runs the penetration into the vulnerable computer, it will download the file containing the main core module, by running it.

Some of these malware use simultaneously various exploits, and in this way, increasing the speed of the process through which they are able to locate and infect potential computer-victim over the network.