oldschool

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Scientists at the University of Bristol and the Technical University of Denmark have achieved quantum teleportation between two computer chips for the first time. The team managed to send information from one chip to another instantly without them being physically or electronically connected, in a feat that opens the door for quantum computers and quantum internet.

This kind of teleportation is made possible by a phenomenon called quantum entanglement, where two particles become so entwined with each other that they can “communicate” over long distances. Changing the properties of one particle will cause the other to instantly change too, no matter how much space separates the two of them. In essence, information is being teleported between them.

Hypothetically, there’s no limit to the distance over which quantum teleportation can operate – and that raises some strange implications that puzzled even Einstein himself. Our current understanding of physics says that nothing can travel faster than the speed of light, and yet, with quantum teleportation, information appears to break that speed limit. Einstein dubbed it “spooky action at a distance.”

Harnessing this phenomenon could clearly be beneficial, and the new study helps bring that closer to reality. The team generated pairs of entangled photons on the chips, and then made a quantum measurement of one. This observation changes the state of the photon, and those changes are then instantly applied to the partner photon in the other chip.
Source: University of Bristol
 

Andy Ful

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The term ''spooky action at a distance' is related to the most popular interpretation of Quantum Mechanics. But, things are slightly more complicated. For example, if one accepts that quantum particles can move backward in time, then there is not 'spooky action at a distance' and Einstein's theory is not violated - we still have only local interactions and nothing moves faster than light. There already exists such theory created by the famous physicist Yakir Aharonov:

The idea of particles moving backward in time is well known from the works of Richard Feynman (Nobel Prize in Physics in 1965). The equations of Quantum Mechanics are valid for particles moving backward in time. In fact, the positron (anti-particle of electron) is identical to the electron moving backward in time. The same is true for any anti-particle. The idea is not widely accepted, because no one created the field theory of particle interactions that could consistently tackle particles moving backward in time.
 

venustus

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The term ''spooky action at a distance' is related to the most popular interpretation of Quantum Mechanics. But, things are slightly more complicated. For example, if one accepts that quantum particles can move backward in time, then there is not 'spooky action at a distance' and Einstein's theory is not violated - we still have only local interactions and nothing moves faster than light. There already exists such theory created by the famous physicist Yakir Aharonov:

The idea of particles moving backward in time is well known from the works of Richard Feynman (Nobel Prize in Physics in 1965). The equations of Quantum Mechanics are valid for particles moving backward in time. In fact, the positron (anti-particle of electron) is identical to the electron moving backward in time. The same is true for any anti-particle. The idea is not widely accepted, because no one created the field theory of particle interactions that could consistently tackle particles moving backward in time.
Very informative..Thanks! (y)

Einstein's EPR paradox trying to disprove quantum entanglement by stating that there must be hidden pre existing variables was wrong because it violated Bell's inequality...Had Einstein been alive he would have accepted defeat to Bohr graciously..QM is indeed non local...An idea that is hard to fathom because it defies all common sense...like this experiment that no one can explain,although I tend to lean towards this as a plausible explanation.

Thanks!:)
 
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