Do you use and Admin Account or a Standard User Account

  • Admin Account

    Votes: 57 76.0%
  • Standard User Account (SUA)

    Votes: 19 25.3%
  • Total voters
    75

blackice

Level 28
Verified
I think the benefits of SUA are a choice that Microsoft should appeal to a little more strongly. This is because users from the days when the administrator account was the default choice tend to perceive the SUA as special or inferior.
 When not actively seeking out threats, the combination of SUA and WD is both safe and stable. The advantage of SUA, in my opinion, is impact mitigation in the event of a fall. The administrator account is bare. If you fall, you will definitely be injured. No one falls over intentionally. He falls when he doesn't notice the pebbles.

 ...I understand the benefits of such, but I'm using an admin account. This is because there is not enough space on the system disk to keep two accounts together.🤐
You must keep a tidy small system disk.
 

show-Zi

Level 28
Verified
There were also times when I was temporarily using SUA. If I knew the password with administrator privileges, it wasn't a problem. I think this controversy will be divided depending on whether the administrator account can be used together. It can be a source of stress if only others know the administrator's password.
 

blackice

Level 28
Verified
There were also times when I was temporarily using SUA. If I knew the password with administrator privileges, it wasn't a problem. I think this controversy will be divided depending on whether the administrator account can be used together. It can be a source of stress if only others know the administrator's password.
My issue is some programs won’t run, or run improperly on startup with SUA. Also, some programs don’t always work as expected on SUA. If programmers designed for SUA I’d be so happy!
 

yuanyasmine

Level 1
If this is your computer and you are responsible for maintaining it then there is no good reason to set your user account to standard. You are the administrator, you need an administrator account.

At least one user needs to be an administrator. Otherwise you would need to reboot into safe mode and log into the special administrators account in order to do any common maintenance tasks. A royal PIA.

The standard account should be reserved for young children or less-than-trustworthy users of your computer, people you fear my make system changes "for fun", or who just can not help but click on that dancing monkey.

Even then it is far better to teach and train them. They will need to behave as administrators themselves one day.
 

Andy Ful

Level 65
Verified
Trusted
Content Creator
There are several good reasons to use SUA, for everyone.
Anyway, there is nothing wrong if one uses only Admin account in daily work. There is nothing wrong too, if one smoke cigarettes, drink alcohol, and do not eat healthily.
But sometimes, it is better to eat healthily and do not take several pills to mitigate bowel obstruction. :)
 
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DDE_Server

Level 21
Verified
Some clarifications about SUA.
  1. One can install applications when logged on SUA (without Admin password), if they do not require Admin rights.
  2. Some web browsers can be installed on SUA even if they initially ask for Admin rights. If the user chooses NO, then the browser can continue installation in %UserProfile% without Admin rights.
  3. The SUA is much safer when we talk about exploiting the programs or Windows features. This follows from the fact that processes running with Admin rights must do it on another account (a particular Admin account) and cannot run on SUA.
  4. One can install applications that require Admin rights when logged on SUA, but after writing the Admin password in UAC prompt, the installation is redirected to the Admin account. This can cause some issues because the application custom settings, made by the user during installation, will be written in the Admin user profile and not in the SUA user profile. After launching the application from SUA, the application cannot access these settings and the application has to be configured again.
  5. When the malware is running on Admin account with standard rigths, this is also the same account for many processes with Admin rights. Sharing the same account by the processes with different privileges is like sharing the same room with people who can be invected by COVID-19.
  6. If the malware is running on SUA (necessarily with standard rights), then there is no processes with Admin rights on SUA. High privileged processes are running on other account(s) (Admin type). This is similar to the situation when the infected patient is isolated in a single room from others.
  7. That is why there are many UAC bypasses on Admin account, but not on SUA.
Thanks Andyful very useful brief.bookmarked for future read.
 

Andy Ful

Level 65
Verified
Trusted
Content Creator
Almost three years ago I wrote the thread about SUA:
I put there a simple UAC bypass that worked on Admin account with UAC set to MAX (Always notify). And let's guess, does it work on the fresh updated Windows 10 1909?
 

SeriousHoax

Level 32
Verified
This is me without admin account 😐
spi.gif
 

Andy Ful

Level 65
Verified
Trusted
Content Creator
I use Admin account for years already without any issues and I don't see any single reason to stop doing that.
Of course I know what I am doing and I can mitigate the risk of infection by using common sense and whitelisting.
I know many people who are smoking cigarettes, drinking alcohol, drive sometimes without seat belts. Most of them live happily until they die.:)(y)
If one feels unhappy with SUA, then probably he/she should not use it. There are many ways to be safe & happy.

Edit.
I do not use SUA (it is not especially convenient for a software developer).
 
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Howard1975

New Member
I'm a new member here at MalwareTips, but not new with computers. I have been using computers since the late 1980s and early 1990's, starting with MS-DOS and Windows 3.1, then later Win95, 98, Win2K, XP, Vista, 7 and now Win10. And I started using Linux in the late 1990's.

Back in the old days, you basically had to use admin account, to get anything done. Honestly I have always used the admin account when using Windows, it is a habit from my 30 years with computers. I still prefer to be the admin when using Windows. I'm often doing tasks that need to be run from the admin account.

I know using SUA for doing everyday tasks has improved a lot, from the way things were 20 years ago with Windows 2000.

When I use Linux, I normally use the standard user account, and only use the root (admin) to install and upgrade software, and admin the computer. Or use sudo on those distros that use sudo.


EDIT: I do plan to use a standard user account more often, for playing games for instance, and basic office tasks. And use admin account, when it is warranted.
 
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