Latest changes
Dec 31, 1969
Windows Edition
Pro
OS version
7601
System type
64-bit operating system; x64-based processor
Windows UAC
Do not dim desktop - Notify me only when programs try to make changes to my computer
Firewall protection
Microsoft Defender Firewall
Account privileges
Account type
Exposure to malware
No malware samples are downloaded
Real-time Malware protection
NVT EXE Radar Pro | Sandboxie
Periodic scanners
Zemana AntiMalware | HitmanPro | Malwarebytes Anti-Malware
Browser and Add-ons
Google Chrome - Netcraft Extension | Avira Browser Safety | uBlock Origin | uBlock Origin WebSocket | KB SSL Enforcer | Tunnello VPN | The Great Suspender | OneTab
chrome security settings
Send a DNT request | malicious site blocking enabled | 3rd Party cookies are blocked | Click-to-Play enabled | Flash is disabled
chrome://flags tweaks
Extension Content Verification = enforce strict | Reduce default 'referer' header granularity is enabled
Privacy tools and VPN
Custom Hosts | uBlock Origin
Password manager
KeePass Portable
Search engine
Google
Maintenance tools
CleanMem | Process Tamer | Auslogics DiskDefrag | CCleaner
Photos and Files backup
None
File Backup schedule
Backup and Restore
None
Backup schedule
No system backups

Kiwimike

Level 1
I hate UAC lol
Running no UAC is as bad as using the root account for everything in Linux.

I highly, highly recommend using UAC. Might I add a good solid reason why. There is a secret and hidden administrator account in Windows, much like the root account in linux which is hidden in some distrobutions. User account control requests access from the administrator account when you need to do something that requires administrative actions. This then means you don't have permissions to do it without user account control.

A lot of people say UAC is not a security feature. But After Windows 8, I think it is now a security feature and is quite important.

One more thing to add is I highly suggest you use SpyShelter if you don't already. It's a great program and I really like it. I think it runs fast and light in the background and doesn't interfere much unless something wants access to something you probably don't want it to.
 

Soulweave

Moderator
Verified
Content Creator
Staff member
Running no UAC is as bad as using the root account for everything in Linux.

I highly, highly recommend using UAC. Might I add a good solid reason why. There is a secret and hidden administrator account in Windows, much like the root account in linux which is hidden in some distrobutions. User account control requests access from the administrator account when you need to do something that requires administrative actions. This then means you don't have permissions to do it without user account control.

A lot of people say UAC is not a security feature. But After Windows 8, I think it is now a security feature and is quite important.

One more thing to add is I highly suggest you use SpyShelter if you don't already. It's a great program and I really like it. I think it runs fast and light in the background and doesn't interfere much unless something wants access to something you probably don't want it to.
for a long time I have ran with UAC turned off and as ROOT on Linux ( I still use that in linux btw). Granted @Overkill knows what he is doing, UAC being off is not a bad thing, plus he knows his system inside out, just like I do. Only reason I have it on default settings now after moving to Windows 10 is because being on or off wouldn't make a difference to my day to day usage and I am just lazy to switch it off.
 

Overkill

Level 31
Verified
Trusted
I appreciate your concern Umbra. I have enabled it in the past, but I always seem to get annoyed soon after and turn it back off. If I ever get infected (which is highly unlikely due to my extremely careful browsing habits and system protection), all I have to do is wipe my drive and start fresh. I backup all important files to my portable drives...malware doesn't scare me a bit!
 
D

Deleted member 178

Yes i know you enough, but when you look at all those malware tests , what is the first thing they do? disabling UAC because it will hampers their tests. i rather be annoyed a bit more and have it enabled.
 

Overkill

Level 31
Verified
Trusted
Dude, my system isn't at risk. You can't tell me UAC will save the day if something nasty enough were to slip thru my layers. I'm sorry, but that's my opinion. That's all i'm saying about that.
 
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Deleted member 178

Dude, my system isn't at risk. You can't tell me UAC will save the day if something nasty enough were to slip thru my layers. I'm sorry, but that's my opinion. That's all i'm saying about that.
Not for you, but think a beginner watching your setup, he will think "he has no UAC , so if i do same i will be fine" , remember we are a forum for beginners and average users. Many malwares will be blocked by UAC, of course targetted attacks won't.

The matter here is to teach the basics of security to members, after if they think they can live without, it is up to them.

It is same as driving without seatbelt, those who dont use it are at risk but that doesnt mean they will have an accident.
 

Overkill

Level 31
Verified
Trusted
I have never claimed to be an expert at security, (MT has helped me greatly). My argument is this...any novice/beginner I know will always click yes to any annoying alert UAC will throw at them (most people are in a hurry to get things done and don't take the time to read an alert from windows). You have to #1 understand #2 actually care about security. My family for example would not even think twice before they click yes to UAC. On my son's pc and the family pc, I have ERP password protected so NOTHING is allowed to run/install without my password, not to mention the other layers I have installed. That's way better than UAC being ignored.
 
D

Deleted member 178

I have never claimed to be an expert at security, (MT has helped me greatly). My argument is this...any novice/beginner I know will always click yes to any annoying alert UAC will throw at them (most people are in a hurry to get things done and don't take the time to read an alert from windows). You have to #1 understand #2 actually care about security. My family for example would not even think twice before they click yes to UAC. On my son's pc and the family pc, I have ERP password protected so NOTHING is allowed to run/install without my password, not to mention the other layers I have installed. That's way better than UAC being ignored.
I don't want open an UAC debate in your thread ; UAC's purpose is to warn the users about a process asking for privileges escalation (whatever the said process is legit or not) , then the user makes his choice.
If you disable UAC you are not warned at all, so no choice is offered, and in case of a suspicious process trying to get admin rights, you will not be aware of it. And you spent time enough in security forums to know that no products can protect at 100%.

My point is that even if UAC can be bypassed by a targeted exploit/malware, it still can protect the users from the other ones. Better 1% more protection than nothing.
 
D

Deleted Member 333v73x

I'm aggreing with @Umbra you can have as many security programs as you wish, but you still can be infected and for a program to so that then it needs administrator privaliges, with UAC you can choose whether to allow it to do so. It can be bypassed but it is difficult and unlikely. Real beginners may turn UAC of because your 'SECURE' or maybe soon 'EXPERT' title and they think it is not needed.
 

jamescv7

Level 85
Verified
Trusted
Well from the first place its hard for a user to convince UAC because of its operation, but majority of users will go back to the traditional way since its practical and ease to use as system continuously operates later on.

Experience users have their own perspective view meanwhile starter users indeed to follow the recommendation.

But in order to be fair enough, the badge will reflect base on what standards should meet. :)
 

XavierGaming

Level 3
@Overkill, Unchecky might conflict with Hostsman. If you actually search for hosts duplicates, you'll find Unchecky's rules already implemented in Hostsman's list thus adding more bloat to your hosts file. Hostsman actually is anti-adware and PUP protection so you might actually want to uninstall Unchecky. :D
 

Overkill

Level 31
Verified
Trusted
I have the host rules turned off in unchecky. I have the rules copied, and I paste them back everytime I update the hosts file. I will check to see if there are new rules every now and then.
 
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