PrivacyTests.org - what data is each web browser leaking? Which web browsers offer the best privacy protections?

Paul.R

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Most web browsers leak your identity and your browsing history, but some browsers are more leaky than others.

The goal of PrivacyTests.org is to understand in detail: what data is each web browser leaking? Which web browsers offer the best privacy protections?

PrivacyTests.org is an open-source initiative that subjects popular web browsers to a suite of automated tests. These tests are designed to audit web browsers' privacy properties in an unbiased manner. The results of the tests are made public to help users make an informed choice about which browser to use, and to encourage browser makers to fix leaks of private user data.

Which browsers are best for privacy?
 
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Azure

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So I assume the fingerprint section is focused on outright blocking. And not on farbling.

Can anyone confirm or deny this? Thank you
 

blacksheep

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I dislike sites like these, because for the people that don't know any of those meanings will just assume to use something that has the most checkmarks, ignoring what useful and useless benefit it passes.

Look at Tor, for example. Even that has a few fails, and I'm now expecting some delusional people to start complaining that "everyone's so-called anonymity browser isn't as private as they thought".
 
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Freki123

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I thought FF privacy.resistFingerprinting would take care of the whole "Fingerprinting resistance" tests if you could live with the minimized start of FF. Because isn't it part of the Tor uplift?
Edit: If you chose "Desktop private modes" they test them with tweaked settings. FF looks a lot better here then.
 
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oldschool

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I dislike sites like these, because for the people that don't know any of those meanings will just assume to use something that has the most checkmarks,
I agree this is true generally. The issue I have is that some sites, especially by "one man" operations, there is usually no explanation of the testing protocol. At least the site in the OP identifies its author - Arthur Edelstein.
I thought FF privacy.resistFingerprinting would take care of the whole "Fingerprinting resistance"
Not the "whole" of fingerprinting, but rather what the Tor Project and Mozilla agree are the main identifiers which they then incorporate into the various builds.
So I assume the fingerprint section is focused on outright blocking. And not on farbling.
Possibly, but I'm not sure either.

The difference between Brave and FF AFAIK is that the latter randomizes data points where the latter makes all users look similar. I think Brave tries to strike a middle ground: randomize, but not too much, so most of their users look similar but different as well. Other members will surely correct me if I'm wrong.
 
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Freki123

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Not the "whole" of fingerprinting, but rather what the Tor Project and Mozilla agree are the main indentifiers which they then incorporate into the various builds.
Sorry what I meant was that when you would enable privacy.resistFingerprinting in Firefox I would expect to see very similar if not the same results as Tor (at least for the fingerprinting resistance test done here).
 

SecureKongo

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Sorry what I meant was that when you would enable privacy.resistFingerprinting in Firefox I would expect to see very similar if not the same results as Tor (at least for the fingerprinting resistance test done here).
Should be the case as LibreWolf also passed all fingerprinting tests and it is just a fork of Firefox :unsure:
 
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