Bryan320

Level 7
So i recently bought a new high powered laptop (intel core I7 10th gen was about $1000 USD.) I installed Malwarebytes premium as i have a lifetime key. I periodically switch my security software around many times through out the year. I have one big question? Does Malwarebytes actually scan all system files? i think it's crazy for Malwarebytes to scan all 261,000 files on my laptop in just 24 seconds!!! This seems unreal even with rootkit scanning enabled or have they mastered the scan speed lol?
 

blackice

Level 27
Verified
So i recently bought a new high powered laptop (intel core I7 10th gen was about $1000 USD.) I installed Malwarebytes premium as i have a lifetime key. I periodically switch my security software around many times through out the year. I have one big question? Does Malwarebytes actually scan all system files? i think it's crazy for Malwarebytes to scan all 261,000 files on my laptop in just 24 seconds!!! This seems unreal even with rootkit scanning enabled or have they mastered the scan speed lol?
It probably caches files and doesn't scan unchanged files. Most AVs do this. I could be wrong, I haven't messed with Malwarebytes in a while.
 

Spawn

Administrator
Verified
Staff member
What scan did you perform?
  1. Quick Scan (Hyper Scan)
  2. Threat Scan
  3. Custom scan
Quick Scans check for threats in your Memory and Startup objects, where threats commonly take place. A Quick Scan is faster than a Threat Scan but less comprehensive. Only Malwarebytes Premium or Trial users can use this scan type. Areas and methods tested include:
  • Memory objects: Memory allocated by operating system processes, drivers, and other apps.
  • Startup objects: Executable files or modifications which initiate at computer startup.

Threat Scans are our recommended scan method that detects threats in the most common system locations. We recommend you run a Threat Scan daily. If you have a Malwarebytes Premium subscription, a Threat Scan is scheduled to run once per day by default. Areas and methods tested include:
  • Memory Objects: Memory allocated by operating system processes, drivers, and other apps.
  • Startup Objects: Executable files or modifications which initiate at computer startup.
  • Registry Objects: Configuration changes which may have been made to the Windows registry.
  • File System Objects: Files stored on your computer's local disk drives which may contain malware.
  • Heuristic Analysis: Methods used by Malwarebytes in the previously described objects and other areas to detect and protect against threats, and assure those threats cannot reassemble themselves.
For consumers - Scan types in Malwarebytes for Windows v4

You should not need to do a Full system scan while the OS is running, it may be faster to run from a Bootable USB/CD.
 

Bryan320

Level 7
Updated reply to how it's scanning is done so quick kind of cool.

"Malwarebytes is not designed to function like normal AV scanners and uses a new kind of scan engine that relies mostly on heuristics detection techniques rather than traditional threat signatures. Malwarebytes is also designed to look in all the locations where malware is known to install itself/hide, so a full or custom scan shouldn't be necessary, especially on any sort of frequent basis (like daily), especially since the default Threat Scan/Quick Scan checks all loading points/startup locations, the registry, all running processes and threads in memory, along with all system folders, program folders and data folders as well as any installed browsers, caches and temp locations. This also means that if a threat were active from a non-standard location, because Malwarebytes checks all threads and processes in memory, it should still be detected. The only threat it *might* miss would be a dormant/inactive threat that is not actively running/installed on a secondary drive, however if the threat were executed then Malwarebytes should detect it. Additionally, whenever a new location is discovered to be used by malware the Malwarebytes Research team adds that location dynamically to the outgoing database updates so the locations that are checked by the default Threat/Quick Scan in Malwarebytes can be changed on the fly by Research without requiring any engine or program version updates/upgrades."
 

AdvancedSetup

From Malwarebytes
Verified
Developer
Malwarebytes does not scan the entire drive unless you do a custom scan to do so. It scans all known load points of malware. The above reply from Bryan320 looks to possibly be from one of our members and previous employee exile360 and summarizes reasonably well.

I've been able to scan over 400K files in about 60 seconds on a high-end computer.
 

SumTingWong

Level 24
Verified
Malwarebytes does not scan the entire drive unless you do a custom scan to do so. It scans all known load points of malware. The above reply from Bryan320 looks to possibly be from one of our members and previous employee exile360 and summarizes reasonably well.

I've been able to scan over 400K files in about 60 seconds on a high-end computer.

Threat scan catches the same amoutn of virus as full system scan?
 
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AdvancedSetup

From Malwarebytes
Verified
Developer
It would depend. Personally I don't see the need for a Full scan more than once as long as you're always using real-time protection modules from the Premium version. It is possible to find malware in places that are not load points often due to users copying the data or having an archive file in a location that is not a normal load point. Perhaps in some cases if doing some risky work you might want to run another full scan monthly or every couple of months.

So, for example. You may want to do a Full scan with all options enabled at least one time. After that, unless you're very actively involved in visiting and downloading software from known sketchy sites or playing with malware on purpose then maybe all you need is a weekly scan for something that may have snuck in. If you feel safer then perhaps the daily threat scan is good for you as well.

So your own behavior out on the Internet and email, etc. and do you keep your other plugins and Windows up to date makes a difference too.
The more risky your day to day behavior is on the computer may warrant more diligence in scanning and using Adblockers, etc. to help keep your computer safe. Don't forget good, solid backups as well. A hardware failure can often cause as much or more data loss than an infection.
 

Spawn

Administrator
Verified
Staff member
A full scan is never a good idea. It's takes an extremely long time to complete and overall a pointless task.

A quick/hyper scan will pick up anything that should not be on the system.

Source: This PC is clean after using Windows Defender Antivirus for 5 years. ZERO MALWARE.
1602094898540.png

Image: Malwarebytes running a Custom scan.
 

Bryan320

Level 7
A full scan is never a good idea. It's takes an extremely long time to complete and overall a pointless task.

A quick/hyper scan will pick up anything that should not be on the system.

Source: This PC is clean after using Windows Defender Antivirus for 5 years. ZERO MALWARE.
View attachment 247055
Image: Malwarebytes running a Custom scan.
That is crazy it only takes 1 minuet to scan my entire laptop (full scan) and it's clean and new as well. I don't doubt you spawn i know you are smart but i have no idea what could be causing it be go 3 hours on a clean system.
 
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McMcbrad

Level 1
That is crazy it only takes 1 minuet to scan my entire laptop (full scan) and it's clean and new as well. I don't doubt you spawn i know you are smart but i have no idea what could be causing it be go 3 hours on a clean system.
4 Hours, not 3 :D
It might be many factors, the system might be slow, maybe the laptop was "sleeping" and then the scan was resume, but it calculates currentTime - startTime or maybe there were too many installers/archived files...maybe all of the above.
 

McMcbrad

Level 1
Here is my full scan time with Malwarebytes.


View attachment 247437
This screenshot doesn't speak about your system configuration, internet connection speed, number of files& folders&exclusions, etc. In general, I consider full system scans unnecessary, since a quick scan will detect active malware and RTP will detect any latent threats before you execute them. Different users, different habits however.
 
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