Gandalf_The_Grey

Level 20
Verified
Several vulnerabilities have been discovered in Comodo Antivirus, including one that allows an attacker to escape the sandbox and escalate privileges, and the vendor does not appear to have released any patches.
David Wells, a researcher at Tenable, uncovered five types of flaws in Comodo Antivirus and Comodo Antivirus Advanced. Four of the issues were identified in version 12.0.0.6810 and one denial-of-service (DoS) bug only impacts version 11.0.0.6582.
The most serious of the vulnerabilities, with a CVSS score of 6.8, is CVE-2019-3969, which allows an attacker with access to the targeted system to escape the Comodo Antivirus sandbox and escalate privileges to SYSTEM.
Another flaw discovered by Wells, CVE-2019-3970, has been described as an arbitrary file write issue that allows an attacker to modify virus definitions. This can be leveraged to create false positives or help malware bypass signature-based detection.
The other three vulnerabilities can be exploited to cause application components and the kernel to crash.
It’s worth noting that exploiting each of these vulnerabilities requires access to the targeted system. Based on their CVSS score, all of the security holes have been classified as “medium” or “low” severity.
Wells has published a blog post detailing the sandbox escape/privilege escalation vulnerability. Proof-of-concept (PoC) exploit code and a video showing the exploit in action have also been made available.
Tenable said it reported its findings to Comodo in mid-April, but no patches appear to have been released and the vendor has not provided any information to Tenable on when it plans to release fixes. Comodo said the privilege escalation vulnerability was partly Microsoft’s fault, but failed to elaborate.

SecurityWeek has reached out to Comodo for comment and will update this article if the company responds.
 

AtlBo

Level 26
Verified
Content Creator
Wish there was information on Comodo Firewall and CIS in the article.

Based on their CVSS score, all of the security holes have been classified as “medium” or “low” severity.
OK, this is a slight relief.

I was tempted to go with CCAV on a laptop here, but I decided to use Kaspersky Security Cloud and Comodo Firewall instead. Guess this kind of outcome is what I feared from CCAV. Personally, I am happy that someone is looking at Comodo products and probing them for weaknesses. In this case, I hope there will be a quick response to Security Week's probe by Comodo or at least quick by Comodo standards...:)

Thankyou very much to @Gandalf_The_Grey for this article :)

The other three vulnerabilities can be exploited to cause application components and the kernel to crash.
It’s worth noting that exploiting each of these vulnerabilities requires access to the targeted system.
Anyone know if internet access would qualify as enough access for an attacker to attack CCAV or the kernel? I am guessing that any type of system access would be enough, internet or otherwise. This is something I have never clarified within myself...if hands on access to the system and internet access to the same are identically powerful...
 

Gandalf_The_Grey

Level 20
Verified
An update:
UPDATE. Comodo has provided SecurityWeek the following statement:
There have been no reported incidents exploiting any of these vulnerabilities and no customers reporting related issues to us. The Comodo product team has been working diligently to resolve all vulnerabilities and all fixes will be released by Monday, July 29.
 
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Anyone know if internet access would qualify as enough access for an attacker to attack CCAV
The answer is yes, theoretically.

Comodo Firewall will be dealing with non-trusted data from external sources on a consistent basis - passed down from the Windows Filtering Platform. Therefore, it is theoretical possible to remotely exploit Comodo Firewall if you could find a bug in the code which handles data from an external source (in which you as a remote attacker have control over, e.g. such as if it was data/data derived from data you sent to the network remotely).

That being said, such bugs are not always reachable or cannot always be leveraged to do anything meaningful - it can take months or years (or never) to turn an exploitable remote kernel DoS vulnerability into a meaningful full fledged privilege escalation exploit.

Attacks like this are cool as well: Issue 693 - project-zero - Project Zero - Monorail