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VectorFool

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Guys
my brother who is a software professional, has been recommended by his firm to install Symantec Endpoint Protection on his laptop.
so i was wondering what is the difference between
Symantec Endpoint Protection Small Business Edition 2013 and Norton™ Internet Security 2013?

are there any differences in Scan Engine, Layers of security, Virus definitions
if you take away the difference in interface, what is the difference between them?
 

McLovin

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The difference between them is that Symantec Endpoint Protection Small Business Edition 2013, can be controlled by the network administrator. Meaning the network admin can install updates, do scans, and a lot more stuff, while NIS 2013 can only be controlled by the person that has access to that PC.

There are no differences (as far as I know) in the file definitions, but I could be wrong.
 
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Payback

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McLovin said:
The difference between them is that Symantec Endpoint Protection Small Business Edition 2013, can be controlled by the network administrator. Meaning the network admin can install updates, do scans, and a lot more stuff, while NIS 2013 can only be controlled by the person that has access to that PC.

There are no differences (as far as I know) in the file definitions, but I could be wrong.
Who uses end-point security? -.- I thought,Norton Internet Security was enough for business
 

Tom172

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Who uses end-point security? -.- I thought,Norton Internet Security was enough for business
You'd rarely see a business running a consumer level security solution. As McLovin said it's all to do with central management and integration with Network Policy Services.

If it's a personal laptop which isn't going to be inside the corporate network, then NIS offers just the same protection and will be much lighter than the business edition.
 

Payback

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Tom172 said:
Who uses end-point security? -.- I thought,Norton Internet Security was enough for business
You'd rarely see a business running a consumer level security solution. As McLovin said it's all to do with central management and integration with Network Policy Services.

If it's a personal laptop which isn't going to be inside the corporate network, then NIS offers just the same protection and will be much lighter than the business edition.
Sorry typo,I meant,why use end-point security for home and not business?
 

McLovin

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Payback said:
Sorry typo,I meant,why use end-point security for home and not business?
In a way you can protect the whole network, but as a home user it would make sense just to use a stranded AV and get a 3 licenses.
 

VectorFool

New Member
Payback said:
Tom172 said:
Who uses end-point security? -.- I thought,Norton Internet Security was enough for business
You'd rarely see a business running a consumer level security solution. As McLovin said it's all to do with central management and integration with Network Policy Services.

If it's a personal laptop which isn't going to be inside the corporate network, then NIS offers just the same protection and will be much lighter than the business edition.
Sorry typo,I meant,why use end-point security for home and not business?
That's because my brother is being offered Symantec Endpoint for free (from his employer firm)
but he would use it only for personal use (no central server connection) i
 
P

Plexx

Payback said:
Who uses end-point security? -.- I thought,Norton Internet Security was enough for business
Endpoint solutions can be used on home computers. I am an user of an Endpoint solution for example.


ESET/Symantec Endpoint arel popular within advanced home users as well as users that have a home network etc.
 

HeffeD

New Member
Payback said:
Sorry typo,I meant,why use end-point security for home and not business?
Because it makes it easy to administrate the security on the other machines on your LAN? ;)
 

Nico@FMA

Level 27
McLovin said:
The difference between them is that Symantec Endpoint Protection Small Business Edition 2013, can be controlled by the network administrator. Meaning the network admin can install updates, do scans, and a lot more stuff, while NIS 2013 can only be controlled by the person that has access to that PC.

There are no differences (as far as I know) in the file definitions, but I could be wrong.
The firewall configurations, Zero day (Plus definitions that go along with specific network exploits) and Policy settings are very different.
As NIS is usually tuned for home use, while SEP is tuned for industry use.
Also the AV engine is pretty much the same, but just does its routine a bit different.
 

jamescv7

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There are some statements that Endpoint security did better than NIS but however its pointless when they are literally same used from Engine and Sonar capabilities.

Viruses are more prevalence on business than home however signatures are primarily same to delivered on all products.
 

Nico@FMA

Level 27
jamescv7 said:
There are some statements that Endpoint security did better than NIS but however its pointless when they are literally same used from Engine and Sonar capabilities.

Viruses are more prevalence on business than home however signatures are primarily same to delivered on all products.
I agree with you that the NIS and SEP Signatures, Patterns Rules & Data and SONAR Signatures are being both supplied from the same update feature in both packages.

The very database itself in SEP and NIS are in no way the same, and one other important part is that the threshold for Detecting, Monitoring and Removal of both engines and its Zeroday & Proactive Defense Protocols are differently calculated. Not to mention that SEP its endpoint collective data gathering is also another way to fight Zeroday malware.
Which is not being used by NIS.

So long story short both solutions are from the same VENDOR and appear to use the same database, engine and algorithm fact is however, thats SEP cannot be compared to NIS as they are 2 very different programs in virtually everything.

So you are both right and wrong at the same time.
Another very big difference is that the out of the box config on both are fundamentally different.
In fact according to Symantec itself, if a costumer would use SEP in a home environment without configuring it properly it would be just as useless as using NIS in a industrial environment, as every single aspect from configuration up to the very workings of the program are not even remotely comparable.
So both packages are specially designed to work from a specific configuration, where NIS is tuned to fit home purposes and SEP is purely tuned for Industrial purposes, that being said the updates that go along with those packages as well the engines are tuned in the same way.

Cheers
 
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