CyberTech

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It’s best practice to use a virtual private network (VPN) to hide your internet activity from snoops. A VPN establishes an encrypted connection between your device of choice and a private server, which can be ideal if you value security. But VPNs are also a dime a dozen in app stores. Worse, it’s often hard to tell them apart. Many VPNs are simply named “VPN” with a generic image of a lock to make you feel secure. We’ve gone over how to set up a VPN. But which VPN should you use?

The problem is that there are too many VPNs out there, and it can take a long time to figure out which ones work the best. At first glance, they all function the same way: you download one, allow it to access a bunch of rights, and press connect to a server (usually the one nearest to you). Googling “best VPN” doesn’t always get the answers, either. One website will say a VPN is incredibly fast, while another will say the same VPN is average speed. Because any VPN worth its salt costs money (something you should definitely keep in mind), you will probably want to take advantage of a free trial. But then there’s a chance that you might forget to cancel, even if you feel it’s an undesirable VPN subscription.

I decided to see for myself which VPNs work the best. I considered a lot of criteria, from which ones have the fastest download speeds to which ones let you run on the most devices simultaneously.

The best VPNs work in multiple countries so that, no matter where you travel, there is a server nearby securely providing fast internet. (It’s a plus if the VPN manages to work in China, one of the few places in the world where a firewall blocks Google and Reddit.) If you’re really security-conscious, you’ll want the VPN’s company headquarters to be located outside of the US and Europe because both require companies to retain your personal data and hand it over to authorities when necessary.

A VPN should work wherever you need to travel and have company headquarters located outside of the US

It’s also important that the VPN you choose doesn’t log your personal data and web activity, ensuring your privacy. You’ll also want your VPN to have an automatic kill switch that will cut off your internet connection in the event the VPN is disconnected so that your IP address isn’t exposed.

Having the largest possible number of servers in the largest number of countries is also essential. If the VPN doesn’t connect within your region, your internet speeds will be significantly slowed. I also took into consideration customer service, user interface, and, of course, pricing.

While I tested these VPNs largely on iOS and Android, all of the ones I chose also support macOS and Windows, and many support Chrome OS and Linux.
Full article and the reviews as well >> The best VPN to use to protect your privacy