upnorth

Level 29
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Hypoxia, is a theory I personal could believe in as after reading a well made and rational article from 2016 on the Air & Space/Smithsonian magazine.
Fariq knew he had to get the squawk code from Ho Chi Minh—but first he had to tune the radio to that frequency. This is about the time when, I think, a rapid decompression happened near or in the cockpit. It would have made a deep and startling noise, like a clap or the sound of a champagne bottle uncorking, only much, much louder and sharper. This would have been followed by a rush of air and things swirling everywhere. A white fog would have filled the space as the drop in temperature turned the moist cabin air into mist. The first officer would have realized immediately: This is an emergency. The denser air inside Fariq’s body would have rushed out through every orifice, an effect that can be particularly painful in the ears, as anyone who has flown with a head cold knows. His fingers, hands, and arms would have started to move spastically. Fariq would have struggled to understand this rapid change from normal to pandemonium while irretrievable seconds of intellectual capacity ticked away. Emergency, have to get down, have to let someone know. What first? He would have reached over to the transponder to enter 7700, the four digits that will alert everyone on the ground and in the air that something has gone wrong with the plane. His fingers would still have been trembling as he clutched the small round knob on the bottom left of the device and turned it to Standby. It is not what he would have intended, but he would already have begun to lose his mental edge. In an attempt to transmit a message of distress, he would have inadvertently severed the only means air controllers had of identifying his airplane and the details of his flight.

I find it logical to assume that Zaharie visited the business class bathroom near the flight deck, which is also used by the flight crew. Airline bathrooms have a drop-down mask to provide oxygen in the case of depressurization. Imagine what it would have been like for Zaharie to see the yellow plastic cup bob down. He had to make a choice: Try to get back to the cockpit without supplemental oxygen, or remain in the bathroom and wait for Fariq to get the airplane to a lower altitude and then rejoin him on the flight deck. I’m guessing Zaharie wasn’t confident in Fariq’s ability to handle the emergency and chose the former course of action. Pilots at Malaysia Airlines tell me that in a rapid decompression, it would have been very difficult for Captain Zaharie to get back onto the flight deck. The captain was unable to regain command of the airplane. If he had, things might have turned out differently.
I recommend read the whole article.

Here is also the last official report. It's only 495 pages. :p

 

oldschool

Level 26
Verified
Hypoxia, is a theory I personal could believe in as after reading a well made and rational article from 2016 on the Air & Space/Smithsonian magazine.
I recommend read the whole article.

Here is also the last official report. It's only 495 pages. :p

Good find!
 

AYIZEB

Level 1
you can not blame the aliens there is no proof, but what is an is that many cases of observation are reported by aircraft pilots (commercial, combat etc.) and even if it was their fault, governments do not They would never say to the public.


:alien::alien::alien::alien::alien:
 

Nestor

Level 8
Hypoxia, is a theory I personal could believe in as after reading a well made and rational article from 2016 on the Air & Space/Smithsonian magazine.
I recommend read the whole article.

Here is also the last official report. It's only 495 pages. :p

Same happened with flight Helios at Greece when a technician at Cyprus,where the plane take off, accidentaly didn't pull the oxygen switch to ON instead he left it at idle,if i am not wrong,making a ghost plane flying on it's own.(all passengers where fainted).Well, it's a theory,but maybe the same happened to flight MH370.
 
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