Switching to Linux

  • Yes I moved away from Windows to Linux for the majority of my tasks.

    Votes: 15 21.1%
  • Tried it, but decided to stick with Windows for now.

    Votes: 36 50.7%
  • Tried it, but decided to stick with Windows permanently

    Votes: 13 18.3%
  • Never tried it, but plan to in the futuer

    Votes: 3 4.2%
  • Never tried it and never will.

    Votes: 4 5.6%
  • Total voters
    71

Raiden

Level 17
Verified
Content Creator
As some of you may know, I have recently been on a Linux kick recently with hopes of moving away from Windows for the majority of my tasks. So far I have tried a bunch of distros and have narrowed it down to either Kubunut, PopOS, or Manjaro KDE. While I would love to move to Linux for everything, unfortunately I will still need Windows for things like gaming and a few apps that aren't available on Linux. For the gaming aspect, I am still back and forth on which route I will take (VFIO, using lutris and steam for linux, or just simple dual boot).

Anyways, I wanted to start this thread more just to have a friendly discussion about your journey with Linux, or even if you ever plan on trying it? If you have tried it, do you plan on switching over at some point, or is there a reason you decided to stick with Windows?

I'm curious as to what you think of switching away from Windows to Linux, post below!:)
 

dark_wielder

Level 2
I'm a Windows user for about 10 years. I have been using Elementary Os for the last 3 months. But I didn't like the battery optimization of linux. There is a wavy CPU usage and this affects the battery very negatively. My battery life began to decrease. I only see this as a negativity. Since I use dual boot, I use Windows for battery life.
 

Sampei Nihira

Level 6
Verified
I have used several Linux distros in the past.
LinuxMint, Xubuntu, Ubuntu, Lubuntu, Debian.
At the middle school, my daughter, was the first child in my city to use a Linux distro on her PC.
I don't tell you the problems to use school-home exercises for teachers' professional inadequacy.

Linux personally, bores me.
There are different problems to solve in everyday use, compared to the Windows world, which I do not consider suitable for my personality.

P.S. I forgot Puppy Linux.
 
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Stopspying

Level 10
I haven't voted because while I'd like to move away from Windows and have used various flavours of Linux for well over 15 years, I still use both. Over the years I've used Linux Mint, various ...buntus, openSuse, Puppy, Fedora, Tails, Trisquel, CentOS, Subgraph etc with the various desktops etc. I want something that I can do normal productivity type tasks, graphic editing and web design for myself and for work to keep abreast of network security tools and tasks. I've yet to hit on one that is a multi-tool that suits me. I like Linux, in many ways its very smooth and stable these days and quite easy to use without knowing much command line stuff if you're not that way inclined. I think where I can get frustrated with Windows and Mac not being flexible enough sometimes (a hybrid of both might suit me) Linux has too many variables! I find a combo of say Fedora and CentOS works OK for me to a large extent currently. I wasn't sure about Gimp replacing Photoshop for me, but recent releases find me using it for many 'normal' editing functions but I still use Photoshop if I want to use things like lots of layers etc LibreOffice works well for just about all office needs of mine. Overall the choice of Linux software is way better than say 15 years ago, relative to progress with Windows software IMO.

I was part of the Windows 10 test program before it was publicly released. I liked the early experience there but as it grew more and more apparent how much we were about to become a bigger part of the product, through telemetry etc I swore that I'd never have Windows 10 as my main OS at home. I've ended up with it on 3 systems and my partner has it on both of her computers! I do dual boot a PC and laptop, which is how it will probably remain for the forseeable future. It can be a pain trying to set up Windows from privacy and security points of view, especially when you risk having many settings wiped out by updates. that is why I'd still like to get away from it for personal use completely, but I need to know what is what for work reasons with regard to Microsoft.
 

Raiden

Level 17
Verified
Content Creator
I think using Linux does not mean throwing out Windows, you can use both systems, with a dual boot.:)
Agreed!

This is what I am leaning towards myself. I was hoping to move away from Windows completely since the software side of things on Linux has gotten much better. It's still not quite there compared to Windows, but it's improving. Even things like gaming via Steam/proton and/or Lutris which makes running Windows games natively a lot easier than before.


I haven't voted because while I'd like to move away from Windows and have used various flavours of Linux for well over 15 years, I still use both. Over the years I've used Linux Mint, various ...buntus, openSuse, Puppy, Fedora, Tails, Trisquel, CentOS, Subgraph etc with the various desktops etc. I want something that I can do normal productivity type tasks, graphic editing and web design for myself and for work to keep abreast of network security tools and tasks. I've yet to hit on one that is a multi-tool that suits me. I like Linux, in many ways its very smooth and stable these days and quite easy to use without knowing much command line stuff if you're not that way inclined. I think where I can get frustrated with Windows and Mac not being flexible enough sometimes (a hybrid of both might suit me) Linux has too many variables! I find a combo of say Fedora and CentOS works OK for me to a large extent currently. I wasn't sure about Gimp replacing Photoshop for me, but recent releases find me using it for many 'normal' editing functions but I still use Photoshop if I want to use things like lots of layers etc LibreOffice works well for just about all office needs of mine. Overall the choice of Linux software is way better than say 15 years ago, relative to progress with Windows software IMO.

I was part of the Windows 10 test program before it was publicly released. I liked the early experience there but as it grew more and more apparent how much we were about to become a bigger part of the product, through telemetry etc I swore that I'd never have Windows 10 as my main OS at home. I've ended up with it on 3 systems and my partner has it on both of her computers! I do dual boot a PC and laptop, which is how it will probably remain for the forseeable future. It can be a pain trying to set up Windows from privacy and security points of view, especially when you risk having many settings wiped out by updates. that is why I'd still like to get away from it for personal use completely, but I need to know what is what for work reasons with regard to Microsoft.
Pretty much my experience as well.

I don't hate Windows 10, I like it, but I've always wanted to move away from it in favor of Linux. Libre Office has gotten pretty good that I can replace MS office. I rarely use Office anyway, so I really won't be missing much by switching. It's just some software here and there that is just easier to use on Windows. So I am leaning towards dual booting Windows and Linux, using Linux as my main OS and booting into Windows when I need to. I was leaning towards using VFIO passthrough for Windows, but it seems like a pain compared to dual booting, but we will have to wait and see what kind of mood I'm in.:p
 

security123

Level 21
People forget that Linux isn't a replacement for windows. It's a alternative and totally different system.

It also depends on user requirements:
Only office stuff with some multimedia?
Games?
Security?

Windows is also maintained by a lot more people and Linux is a security desaster and years behind windows security. Linux folks don't want hear that, believe and say it's wrong but it isn't. Security experts like Daniel Micay post some about that.

and about "OpenSource": I love OpenSource but nowadays people think that such software is automatically secure cause everyone read the source.
first only few people *can* read the source and understand it. If one beside the dev at all.
reading the code is necessary for every change / update.
second it's mostly build in free time / for free which means the maintenance is low and slow which isn't good for security again.
A lot of OpenSource projects get inactive after some time and a lot of people start / fork another project which do the same, instead of helping already existing projects.
Same for the many Linux distris: one guy make some random change like add different wallpaper & icons and publish it. He don't care about security at all and after short time he will stop this project and user's are need to switch again. With that time and power he better help existing projects but nope, not so in OpenSource.

I personally only use Windows 10 on all PC's and run Raspbian (Debian for Raspberry Pi) on my two Raspberry Pi's.
 

Raiden

Level 17
Verified
Content Creator
People forget that Linux isn't a replacement for windows. It's a alternative and totally different system.

It also depends on user requirements:
Only office stuff with some multimedia?
Games?
Security?

Windows is also maintained by a lot more people and Linux is a security desaster and years behind windows security. Linux folks don't want hear that, believe and say it's wrong but it isn't. Security experts like Daniel Micay post some about that.

and about "OpenSource": I love OpenSource but nowadays people think that such software is automatically secure cause everyone read the source.
first only few people *can* read the source and understand it. If one beside the dev at all.
reading the code is necessary for every change / update.
second it's mostly build in free time / for free which means the maintenance is low and slow which isn't good for security again.
A lot of OpenSource projects get inactive after some time and a lot of people start / fork another project which do the same, instead of helping already existing projects.
Same for the many Linux distris: one guy make some random change like add different wallpaper & icons and publish it. He don't care about security at all and after short time he will stop this project and user's are need to switch again. With that time and power he better help existing projects but nope, not so in OpenSource.

I personally only use Windows 10 on all PC's and run Raspbian (Debian for Raspberry Pi) on my two Raspberry Pi's.
All very good points!

It's very true and something I have noticed myself. There are many reasons as to why Linux on personal computers hasn't taken off since it came to existence. Linux like MacOS did some things right when it comes to security, but in all honesty their "more secure than Windows" mantra really has to do with the fact that their market share is very low by comparison. That doesn't mean that malware cannot be written for those OSes, nor does it mean that they cannot be hacked either.

From what I have seen poking around the open source/Linux communities, I feel like they are really beating themselves at their own game. It's exactly like you said, there are way more Linux distros than you can count, which only leads to confusion. You have in-fighting within these communities over stupidity IMHO. Take Arch Linux for example, the "Arch Linux" community takes issues with Manjaro, which is based off Arch Linux. Someone using Manajro asks the Arch Linux community for help, they get chastised saying don't you dare ask any questions here, Manjaro is not Arch Linux, blah, blah, blah...

While I can appreciate that open source and Linux has always preached about having choice and that people can use and share code, etc... IMHO it really hasn't made things better, only worse. Like you said the majority of these projects are being done on the side so over time many of them just stop. You have this stupid in-fighting, so someone gets mad and goes "fine will fork and do my own thing." Also I think they have also created this stupid assumption that everything has about Linux/Open source has to be free.

Sometimes I don't think they realize that they are the ones causing the problems, not MS, nor anyone else. If I was a big game developer, or software company, why should I waste resources developing for Linux when the ecosystem is so fragmented and there's no constancy between all the distros. At least with Windows and/or MacOS, it's all the same. Same UI, same everything, so there is far more consistency compared to Linux.

Personally I feel like if Linux wants to really take off, they need to come together and work together. Firstly they need to have far fewer distros than is out there currently and only have 1 or 2 DE's max. They also need to have far more consistency then they currently do, ie: a program that is developed for Ubuntu for example can also work and be installed on Fedora without having to recompile the code for rmp and such. Finally, they need to rely far less on the command line to do things.
I'm guessing that you want this to run it on a VM, I've not tried that with Windows for some time. I did try running Windows 7 as a VM on Linux maybe 6-7 years ago, it wasn't a good experience. Things might have improved by now though.
Yes it's pretty much a VM. You almost set it up like a dual boot with it's own HDD/SSD, but you can set it up in Linux to run as a VM. You can then give it permission to have direct access to the hardware CPU and GPU, etc.. so while running as a VM, it pretty much runs as if it's installed directly to the system. Only issues are is that you need two GPUs, a CPU with enough cores/threads and a motherboard with decent IOMMU groupings. When configured it's nice as you don't have to dual boot, but dual booting is far easier to implement by comparison.
 
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bribon77

Level 33
Verified
I also agree that there are many distributions, which are unnecessary and confuse the inexperienced user on Linux.
But you must also understand that Linux does not belong to any company like Andrid or Mac or even M $, all these companies obtain economic benefits, that is, you must pay to obtain them.
Linux is open source and anyone who knows a bit makes a new distribution that is, in some ways, the greatness of Linux.
People like MT users will have no trouble choosing a Linux distribution, nor will they be confused.:)
 

security123

Level 21
I also agree that there are many distributions, which are unnecessary and confuse the inexperienced user on Linux.
Even people with high knowledge get confused and angry if distri X stop's development and this is possible every day.

Linux is open source and anyone who knows a bit makes a new distribution that is, in some ways, the greatness of Linux.
This is the problem and not a nice have to.
And this is the answer why Linux is world wide most used system (Android, Router...), but ironically less used system in desktop.

Also everyone *can* make a new distribution but that doesn't mean that he *should* make it nor that's desired from user's.
Linux is so highly fragmented, that they create their own dead and btw every fingerprinting site love tracking Linux user's ;) Just too easy
 

bribon77

Level 33
Verified
Even people with high knowledge get confused and angry if distri X stop's development and this is possible every day.


This is the problem and not a nice have to.
And this is the answer why Linux is world wide most used system (Android, Router...), but ironically less used system in desktop.

Also everyone *can* make a new distribution but that doesn't mean that he *should* make it nor that's desired from user's.
Linux is so highly fragmented, that they create their own dead and btw every fingerprinting site love tracking Linux user's ;) Just too easy
People who want to use linux should go to distributions with a large community.
Whether it's Arch Linux, Ubuntu, Mint Debian, Manjaro, etc.
I do not think there are problems with these distributions, because it has been well proven for years.
Another thing is that you don't like Linux, which is also respectable.(y)
 

Local Host

Level 22
Verified
People who want to use linux should go to distributions with a large community.
Whether it's Arch Linux, Ubuntu, Mint Debian, Manjaro, etc.
I do not think there are problems with these distributions, because it has been well proven for years.
Another thing is that you don't like Linux, which is also respectable.(y)
I still remember not long ago, Ubuntu Store wasn't even working on the latest stable builds, is one of many examples were Linux is far from stable and hasn't proven anything yet either (only noise from fans).

Everything @security123 and @Raiden said is spot on, the way it's going Linux will never go anywhere, as stated is too fragmented, and there's no sense of community to make it better, everyone is doing their own thing.
 

bribon77

Level 33
Verified
I still remember not long ago, Ubuntu Store wasn't even working on the latest stable builds, is one of many examples were Linux is far from stable and hasn't proven anything yet either (only noise from fans).

Everything @security123 and @Raiden said is spot on, the way it's going Linux will never go anywhere, as stated is too fragmented, and there's no sense of community to make it better, everyone is doing their own thing.
I also agree with them.:)
 
i'm using Manjaro KDE on laptop for years now and it is crazy how stable it is. I would recommend it to you and it is user/beginner friendly.
Anything releated to Ubuntu was disaster. I was big Ubuntu fan in the past (gnome 2) but it is getting worse and worse.

If you don't mind booting daily from system to system then go with dual boot.

After Manjaro install, all you have to do is install pamac and enable AUR and system is ready to go.
 

Stopspying

Level 10
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Thanks for the explanation, I'll stick to dual-booting I think!
 
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