Switching to Linux

  • Yes I moved away from Windows to Linux for the majority of my tasks.

    Votes: 15 21.1%
  • Tried it, but decided to stick with Windows for now.

    Votes: 36 50.7%
  • Tried it, but decided to stick with Windows permanently

    Votes: 13 18.3%
  • Never tried it, but plan to in the futuer

    Votes: 3 4.2%
  • Never tried it and never will.

    Votes: 4 5.6%
  • Total voters
    71

rockstarrocks

Level 22
Verified
I have used Linux Distros in past (Ubuntu, Manjaro, Puppy Linux, Mint, Elementary, Peppermint, etc) as standalone as well as dual boot with Windows and I always come back to Windows because of these things:
1. Battery backup has never been as good as on Windows.
2. Touchpad gestures won't work as you would expect (depends in Laptop model and distro used, sometimes it work out of the box)
3. Hardware decoding for video playback is significantly better on Windows. Even scrolling works much better on Windows. Overall hardware acceleration is worse on Linux Distros in my experience (with both AMD and Intel iGPUs)
4. I can solve minor issues on Windows much much faster. On Linux I usually have to Google it first (for the same Distro).
5. Forgot about Gaming and other 3rd party apps which are Windows exclusive.
 

Stopspying

Level 10
4. I can solve minor issues on Windows much much faster. On Linux I usually have to Google it first (for the same Distro).
Yes, we're back to the overwhelming number of distros here. Fixing issues isn't always a universal procedure on Linux, we need to do more research normally to find the solution for the exact distro, compared to Windows. Especially now Win 10 has become the major version(ooppss, I've just praised Microsoft, possibly for the first time on MT!)
 

shmu26

Level 85
Verified
Trusted
Content Creator
I like Linux, but I need certain Windows-only programs for my work. I could run them in a virtual machine, or just use Windows. The latter is more productive.
Until recently, I preferred my Windows virtual machine, because it is easily portable to another computer, all you need to do is copy the files over. But a few days ago, I successfully cloned Windows from my desktop to a laptop. No issues. So a physical Windows installation can also be portable, with a little luck.
 

Raiden

Level 18
Verified
Content Creator
I have been a Linux user for a long time, but I am not a fan of any operating system, I see errors in Linux and Windows.
If I can say that I feel good in Linux, but I do not rule out Windows. :)

I really like Linux too and I do want to see it succeed, so hence some of my observations/frustrations. Aside from gaming I don't really have any major programs that I requires me to use Windows. It's just these little nagging things that keep me from switching fully. Take Gnome for example, I recently installed PopOS (great distro btw) in a VM and I immediately installed KDE. I tried getting use to Gnome, but I question some of their decisions. For example there's no minimize/maximize window button(s) without having to install a separate extension. :confused: Maybe I am to use to Windows, hence why I gravitate towards KDE, but I feel like that should be built in, I shouldn't have to install an extension to make it work.
 

bribon77

Level 34
Verified
I really like Linux too and I do want to see it succeed, so hence some of my observations/frustrations. Aside from gaming I don't really have any major programs that I requires me to use Windows. It's just these little nagging things that keep me from switching fully. Take Gnome for example, I recently installed PopOS (great distro btw) in a VM and I immediately installed KDE. I tried getting use to Gnome, but I question some of their decisions. For example there's no minimize/maximize window button(s) without having to install a separate extension. :confused: Maybe I am to use to Windows, hence why I gravitate towards KDE, but I feel like that should be built in, I shouldn't have to install an extension to make it work.
I don't like Gnome. Choosing a desk is sometimes complicated,
I use XFCE since Ubuntu switched to Unity long time ago.
It is not the most beautiful nor the easiest to configure, at least in Debian, or in Xubuntu, but in Manjaro and MX linux they are quite tuned.
 
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shmu26

Level 85
Verified
Trusted
Content Creator
I really like Linux too and I do want to see it succeed, so hence some of my observations/frustrations. Aside from gaming I don't really have any major programs that I requires me to use Windows. It's just these little nagging things that keep me from switching fully. Take Gnome for example, I recently installed PopOS (great distro btw) in a VM and I immediately installed KDE. I tried getting use to Gnome, but I question some of their decisions. For example there's no minimize/maximize window button(s) without having to install a separate extension. :confused: Maybe I am to use to Windows, hence why I gravitate towards KDE, but I feel like that should be built in, I shouldn't have to install an extension to make it work.
What do you like about PopOS?
 

Raiden

Level 18
Verified
Content Creator
I don't like Gnome. Choosing a desk is sometimes complicated,
I use XFCE since Ubuntu switched to Unity long time ago.
It is not the most beautiful nor the easiest to configure, at least in Debian, or in Xubuntu, but in Manjaro and MX linux they are quite tuned.

Personally I didn't mind gnome v2, but it seems like the stripped a lot out with v3. Some of which doesn't even make sense from a UI mouse/keyboard point of view. I compare it to W8. They tried to do something different, but for a mouse and keyboard setup it failed miserably. I tried XFCE, its nice and fast, but like you said not much bling and I like some bling. :D KDE plasma seems to be going strong and is my preferred DE atm.

What do you like about PopOS?

I haven't used it for very long this far, but so far it seems to be a much more polished Ubuntu. It's based of Ubuntu, but from what I've read so far, it matches my experience. The team behind it has taken the time to clean up some things that Canonical seems to ignore. Its faster IMO and even though it's UI is gnome by default, it's actually not bad. I've since replaced it with KDE, as I am not a fan of Gnome. Their site is pretty helpful and has a lot of great info. Their store, which is based of the Elementary store, is pretty nice and they make it easy to install/uninstall apps. Another plus for me is that it's faster for gaming compared to Ubuntu (based on some tests I've seen), even though they are essentially the same under the hood, but it shows that they have taken the time to clean up and tweak things.

I recommend giving it a try if you haven't already, it pretty nice IMHO.(y)
 

Lenny_Fox

Level 14
Verified
I moved from Windows to Linux because I did want to finish study without gaming attractions. Part of my de-game-diction was moving to an old second hand lenovo Thinkpad (with dual core Intel Celeron @ 2Ghz, 4GB RAM and a 250 Hybrid HD). I finished stuff from school as planned and really started to like Manjaro with XFCE desktop (and Sophos AV on access).

Found an old Windows 10 Pro sticker on the back of the PC and tried for fun whether it would install. Company I work with parttime uses Office, so I bought a digital office license for a few bucks and initially used Windows for Office stuff only.

Having four email addresses (private, school and two parttime jobs) I started to use Windows 10 mail together with Outlook for android on my smartphone for easy synchronizing of mail and agenda. Nowadays I barely use Linux Manjaro anymore.

Security wise Microsoft (with Windows Defender and Hard_Configurator) is good enough for me, so I am thinking of removing my Linux Boot (and changing my form name to Lazy_Lenny).
 

WhiteMouse

Level 2
Verified
I really like Linux too and I do want to see it succeed, so hence some of my observations/frustrations. Aside from gaming I don't really have any major programs that I requires me to use Windows. It's just these little nagging things that keep me from switching fully. Take Gnome for example, I recently installed PopOS (great distro btw) in a VM and I immediately installed KDE. I tried getting use to Gnome, but I question some of their decisions. For example there's no minimize/maximize window button(s) without having to install a separate extension. :confused: Maybe I am to use to Windows, hence why I gravitate towards KDE, but I feel like that should be built in, I shouldn't have to install an extension to make it work.
I also want Linux to succeed, more choice is always better for consumer.
 

TairikuOkami

Level 28
Verified
Content Creator
Last time I tried Ubuntu, it even failed to remember brightness setting after reboot. I keep Kubuntu and Mint on USB as a live CD, in case I need it, but I gave up on Linux. The best distros are comparable to Windows 7, the rest is like Windows XP. If Linux gets to 5% in 2050, it will be a miracle.
 
B

BVLon

All very good points!

It's very true and something I have noticed myself. There are many reasons as to why Linux on personal computers hasn't taken off since it came to existence. Linux like MacOS did some things right when it comes to security, but in all honesty their "more secure than Windows" mantra really has to do with the fact that their market share is very low by comparison. That doesn't mean that malware cannot be written for those OSes, nor does it mean that they cannot be hacked either.

From what I have seen poking around the open source/Linux communities, I feel like they are really beating themselves at their own game. It's exactly like you said, there are way more Linux distros than you can count, which only leads to confusion. You have in-fighting within these communities over stupidity IMHO. Take Arch Linux for example, the "Arch Linux" community takes issues with Manjaro, which is based off Arch Linux. Someone using Manajro asks the Arch Linux community for help, they get chastised saying don't you dare ask any questions here, Manjaro is not Arch Linux, blah, blah, blah...

While I can appreciate that open source and Linux has always preached about having choice and that people can use and share code, etc... IMHO it really hasn't made things better, only worse. Like you said the majority of these projects are being done on the side so over time many of them just stop. You have this stupid in-fighting, so someone gets mad and goes "fine will fork and do my own thing." Also I think they have also created this stupid assumption that everything has about Linux/Open source has to be free.

Sometimes I don't think they realize that they are the ones causing the problems, not MS, nor anyone else. If I was a big game developer, or software company, why should I waste resources developing for Linux when the ecosystem is so fragmented and there's no constancy between all the distros. At least with Windows and/or MacOS, it's all the same. Same UI, same everything, so there is far more consistency compared to Linux.

Personally I feel like if Linux wants to really take off, they need to come together and work together. Firstly they need to have far fewer distros than is out there currently and only have 1 or 2 DE's max. They also need to have far more consistency then they currently do, ie: a program that is developed for Ubuntu for example can also work and be installed on Fedora without having to recompile the code for rmp and such. Finally, they need to rely far less on the command line to do things.


Yes it's pretty much a VM. You almost set it up like a dual boot with it's own HDD/SSD, but you can set it up in Linux to run as a VM. You can then give it permission to have direct access to the hardware CPU and GPU, etc.. so while running as a VM, it pretty much runs as if it's installed directly to the system. Only issues are is that you need two GPUs, a CPU with enough cores/threads and a motherboard with decent IOMMU groupings. When configured it's nice as you don't have to dual boot, but dual booting is far easier to implement by comparison.
It's true, Linux security comes from the lack of interest to make it insecure. I personally have tried to put Linux on many devices. If it's an old device, Linux works great. On new devices it's just issues and pain. Either the GPU won't work properly, or the Wi-Fi adapter/sound... etc. With Windows everything just works. Battery lasts shorter and I feel Windows or a Chrome OS fork (although these are quite problematic too) are just better option. Linux just doesn't put the hardware to a good use. I am excluding the Intel ClearLinux as I have not tried it and I am not sure if it's the same as Ubuntu, Debian, Fedora and all these mainstream distros.
 

bribon77

Level 34
Verified
Last time I tried Ubuntu, it even failed to remember brightness setting after reboot. I keep Kubuntu and Mint on USB as a live CD, in case I need it, but I gave up on Linux. The best distros are comparable to Windows 7, the rest is like Windows XP. If Linux gets to 5% in 2050, it will be a miracle.
To adjust the brightness, I use Cairo-doc. There is an application to regulate the brightness.
I will upload a screenshot, when I'm in linux, now I'm in Win.
 

Raiden

Level 18
Verified
Content Creator
I moved from Windows to Linux because I did want to finish study without gaming attractions. Part of my de-game-diction was moving to an old second hand lenovo Thinkpad (with dual core Intel Celeron @ 2Ghz, 4GB RAM and a 250 Hybrid HD). I finished stuff from school as planned and really started to like Manjaro with XFCE desktop (and Sophos AV on access).

Found an old Windows 10 Pro sticker on the back of the PC and tried for fun whether it would install. Company I work with parttime uses Office, so I bought a digital office license for a few bucks and initially used Windows for Office stuff only.

Having four email addresses (private, school and two parttime jobs) I started to use Windows 10 mail together with Outlook for android on my smartphone for easy synchronizing of mail and agenda. Nowadays I barely use Linux Manjaro anymore.

Security wise Microsoft (with Windows Defender and Hard_Configurator) is good enough for me, so I am thinking of removing my Linux Boot (and changing my form name to Lazy_Lenny).
I won't lie, MS has done a great job with W10. It still has it's issues here and there, but for the most part it has been rock solid for me. That's that hardest part of letting go. While I am enjoying my Linux journey, I will confess that at the end of it all I may just end up sticking with W10 and playing around with Linux in a VM. Everything is integrated better with W10. I can easily access my OneDrive account, emails and such. All my games and programs I use work. I know my way around Windows fairly well and am able to troubleshoot issues quite easily, many of which do not require command line use.


Last time I tried Ubuntu, it even failed to remember brightness setting after reboot. I keep Kubuntu and Mint on USB as a live CD, in case I need it, but I gave up on Linux. The best distros are comparable to Windows 7, the rest is like Windows XP. If Linux gets to 5% in 2050, it will be a miracle.

It's sad but true. I personally feel like this is the result of:
a: Linux being too fragmented
b: Opensource/Linux being based off giving it away for free.

Personally I feel like if they stop this fragmentation issue and start working together, instead of apart, they may get a lot further. Also if they actually start charging money for things, they may start attracting more developers and more skilled ones at that, as they know they can make a living off of it. Problem is, they have gone down the free road for so long that if anyone decided to start charging for their OS, the Linux community would cry foul (how dare you charge for your hard work and want to make a living) and either move on to another distro, or because of the open source licensing (while good in philosophy, it's bad in reality IMHO) someone will just fork it and the trend continues.

It's true, Linux security comes from the lack of interest to make it insecure. I personally have tried to put Linux on many devices. If it's an old device, Linux works great. On new devices it's just issues and pain. Either the GPU won't work properly, or the Wi-Fi adapter/sound... etc. With Windows everything just works. Battery lasts shorter and I feel Windows or a Chrome OS fork (although these are quite problematic too) are just better option. Linux just doesn't put the hardware to a good use. I am excluding the Intel ClearLinux as I have not tried it and I am not sure if it's the same as Ubuntu, Debian, Fedora and all these mainstream distros.
When it come to hardware, Linux is set up very differently than Windows when it comes to drivers. With Windows they have their standard drivers, but you can still download and install them separately as they are released by the hardware manufacturers. With Linux you can do this in some instances, but for the most part the hardware drivers are built into the Linux kernel. So until you get a new version of the Kernel you really don't get the new up to date drivers. This is another big issue with Linux IMHO as some distros have rolling releases like Arch and Manjaro, so they usually have more up to date kernels. Where as many other distros don't update their kernels until a major release and even then it still may not be the most up to date kernel. While possible to update the kernel manually, it's not always an intuitive process on some distros.

Even simple things like setting up a network printer.

Windows: looking for printer, is this it, yes, ok thanks installing printer/driver.
Linux: (blank stare) which protocol, ok ip/domain, ok which printer manufacturer, ok which model, ok thanks installing. Oh wait not working, start over, which protocol, etc....
I do not think it will have the desired success, PCs already come with W10, only a handful of people venture to install Linux.
It's hard to compete with that, but I do think that Linux should have gotten further than it did IMHO. It's not that it's impossible to make a better product than Windows, it's just that they really never set themselves up for success IMHO and 15 years later it really hasn't moved. While I'm sure many of them still want to blame the likes of MS for that, they really only have themselves to blame IMHO, as it's evident that they cannot fully work together and projects are constantly being started, stopped and forked. This literally is a great example of a bunch of individuals working independently with differing goals and objectives, vs a team focused and working together all on a common goal. Usually the focused team wins in these scenarios.
 
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Cortex

Level 23
Verified
The Distro fans as above arguing among themselves helps the whole thing not at all - I can't see it becoming mainstream now instead of Windows, I thought it might some years ago but the share hasn't changed that much - Dual booting with Windows works well until you have an issue with Grub and Windows boot, & it's hassle I don't need, there are several programs I use that don't have as good a counterpart in Linux, or any - That's apart from Office 360, there are office suites for Linux that are pretty good such as Softmaker but missing Outlook - I suppose I'm not willing to maintain two OS's, & Windows over the years with all it's irks has done me very well.
 

Spawn

Administrator
Verified
Staff member
Is Android, FireOS, ChromeOS, PS4 'Orbis' OS considered Linux too?
Anyways, I wanted to start this thread more just to have a friendly discussion about your journey with Linux, or even if you ever plan on trying it? If you have tried it, do you plan on switching over at some point, or is there a reason you decided to stick with Windows?

I'm curious as to what you think of switching away from Windows to Linux, post below!:)
 

Raiden

Level 18
Verified
Content Creator
The Distro fans as above arguing among themselves helps the whole thing not at all - I can't see it becoming mainstream now instead of Windows, I thought it might some years ago but the share hasn't changed that much - Dual booting with Windows works well until you have an issue with Grub and Windows boot, & it's hassle I don't need, there are several programs I use that don't have as good a counterpart in Linux, or any - That's apart from Office 360, there are office suites for Linux that are pretty good such as Softmaker but missing Outlook - I suppose I'm not willing to maintain two OS's, & Windows over the years with all it's irks has done me very well.

I too was hoping it would change, but if it hasn't changed now, it will never change unfortunately. It's all this stupid fighting within the community and their unwillingness to work together, but instead go it alone. Don't get me wrong, there are many things that have gotten better, but I don't think it's enough to take more market share away from Windows.

In regards to dual booting, that is also another thing I was going back and forth on. Even if I decide to use Linux as my main OS and dual boot into Windows to game and for the odd application, I still have to maintain both. I still have to log into Windows and keep it up to date along with drivers and other software. So the question now becomes, do I want to maintain both, or just one?:unsure:


Is Android, FireOS, ChromeOS, PS4 'Orbis' OS considered Linux too?

That's very true!

I was mostly focusing on the PC side of things, but your right, when it comes to servers, IoT and smaller devices, it has done better by comparison. I think it's mostly due to the opensource licensing and the fact they don't want to design it fully from scratch. I don't think it's from a security standpoint because Android is constantly getting infected and IoT devices, well they are a security nightmare as it is, but aside from those areas, Linux really hasn't taken off on the PC side of things.
 
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bribon77

Level 34
Verified
To adjust the brightness, I use Cairo-doc. There is an application to regulate the brightness.
I will upload a screenshot, when I'm in linux, now I'm in Win.
Install Cairo-Dock. Right-click any icon> Cairo Dock> configure> Additional Components> find screen brightness> check the box
ksnip_20200315-182350.png

ksnip_20200315-190127.png
 
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