Switching to Linux

  • Yes I moved away from Windows to Linux for the majority of my tasks.

    Votes: 15 21.1%
  • Tried it, but decided to stick with Windows for now.

    Votes: 36 50.7%
  • Tried it, but decided to stick with Windows permanently

    Votes: 13 18.3%
  • Never tried it, but plan to in the futuer

    Votes: 3 4.2%
  • Never tried it and never will.

    Votes: 4 5.6%
  • Total voters
    71

shmu26

Level 85
Verified
Trusted
Content Creator
I was thinking about something similar. If I had 8GB more RAM I would use this method. Definitely cheaper than buying an another laptop 😁
Windows 10 in a VM runs beautifully on 4 GB allocated to the VM. So a total of 8 GB is sufficient for a linux host and windows guest. A system with less than 8 GB is cutting it tight but might be possible.
 

Step 1

Level 3
Verified
Linux's main problem is getting new users.
Some because they do not want to use the terminal (it is not always necessary) and others because there are fewer games or with worse performance.
For a normal user (web, email, reading online newspapers, ect ...) Linux should be the way
I normally use Linux, but I keep dual boot to boot as needed
 
too many linux distros. imo this is big big problem for any beginner. How many people have time to install OS so many times to see which distro is best for him? Not many.
Hardware is another issue. You have to be very lucky to find distro where hardware would work out of the box. I had problem with HP printer. On ubuntu/mint/elementary/fedora would print fine but scan didn't work. On Manjaro scan works fine. Most people would give up after distro or two and go back to Windows.

All developers should make 2 or 3 distros and work hard on hardware compatibility. In that case im sure linux would have more success on market, which would wake up other hardware companies to make better drivers
 

Chuck57

Level 3
Verified
Well, got to eat my words. I posted in one of the Linux threads that until it became more user friendly, I was staying away. Since then, and reading some other posts, I've been snooping around on Distro Watch and checking out a few.

I've got to stay with Windows because there's software I need that simply is not available to Linux. BUT, that doesn't stop me from dual booting between Linux and Win 10 - although I've also read it can cause update problems for Windows.

I've settled on MX Linux, current version and got the ISO on DVD and have been playing with it. I have NOT done more than work with LibreOffice, surf with Firefox, and fool around with other software to see what it was. That's all I'd do anyway if it was my main OS. I've no interest in doing more than I do with Win 10.

Now, dual booting. How difficult is it, keeping in mind I break into a cold sweat and have heart palpitations just restoring a backup? I know there's something about needing to partition, and understand Gparted can do that during the installation. I also have a fresh backup created just in case, and with me just in case is almost a guarantee.
 

Kermit80

Level 1
Hardware is another issue. You have to be very lucky to find distro where hardware would work out of the box. I had problem with HP printer. On ubuntu/mint/elementary/fedora would print fine but scan didn't work. On Manjaro scan works fine. Most people would give up after distro or two and go back to Windows.
my experience is different. It's on Windows that I usually have to troubleshoot printing and scanning issues. On Linux (Ubuntu) usually everything works out of the box.
 

HarborFront

Level 54
Verified
Content Creator
I'm a late comer. Not sure doing the right things for I'm still learning.

Just installed the latest Linux Mint Mate in VB on my Windows 10 host machine.

Erected the UFW firewall and Firejail (with Firetools) my FF browser. Will consider Apparmor FF later. Also, have TOR installed. Either will be running double-hop VPN from host to VM using FF browser or using TOR-over-VPN inside VM

Planning to use FF browser in VB instead of Windows and use Brave browser on Windows alone


Edit

After some consideration, added ClamAV with its ClamTK GUI. Although it has no real-time protection I schedule it to scan daily. ESET NOD32 is great but its use may interfere with Apparmor. Read below. Not sure the issue has been resolved

 
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HarborFront

Level 54
Verified
Content Creator
Since you are using VB and can just restore to a previous snapshot, you don't really need an AV.
Edited my above post and added ClamAV with its ClamTK GUI.

When I exit VB it gives options like saving the machine state or shut down the machine.

If the VM now is infected with a virus I'll need to shut down the machine and, on powering up, I'll get a new state. If not infected, then I'll save the machine state for a faster start up the next time.

I can't find restore to a previous snapshot. Is there something like restore points in Windows where I can restore to any of the previous snapshot?

Thanks
 
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Stopspying

Level 10
Now, dual booting. How difficult is it, keeping in mind I break into a cold sweat and have heart palpitations just restoring a backup? I know there's something about needing to partition, and understand Gparted can do that during the installation. I also have a fresh backup created just in case, and with me just in case is almost a guarantee.
You could try using using EasyBCD to set up a dual boot system, its fairly straightforward if you read the documentation.

 

Kermit80

Level 1

Raiden

Level 17
Verified
Content Creator
I am planning to get another cheap SSD for Kubuntu and start slowly using it. Gonna leave Windows only for games.
It's a pretty good compromise. I've been using Linux as my daily driver and will boot into Windows for the odd task. I am looking at VFIO passthrough as a replacement for dual booting, as it will give me a VM experience for Windows, but pretty darn close to bare metal speed. TBH one thing that has impressed me with Linux is the fact that gaming has gotten significantly better. Sure there are still some games that don't work fully, but in all honesty between Lutris, Steam Protron and DXVK, you can pretty much play most windows games on Linux, even newer ones.

Linux's main problem is getting new users.
Some because they do not want to use the terminal (it is not always necessary) and others because there are fewer games or with worse performance.
For a normal user (web, email, reading online newspapers, ect ...) Linux should be the way
Linux does have a problem attracting new users, as well as keeping them. There are many factors to this, terminal being one, apps, endless number of distros available, hostile Linux users in many scenarios, etc...

All developers should make 2 or 3 distros and work hard on hardware compatibility. In that case I'm sure Linux would have more success on market, which would wake up other hardware companies to make better drivers
Agreed.

Personally I feel like the opensource/Linux community has completely lost sight of the bigger picture. I feel like they have focused so much on the "free" and forking side of things that they don't realize it's doing more harm then good. I mean does opensource always have to remain free? Why cannot someone make money off it to make a living off of it. They can still make it opensource, but I feel like it's little things like this that is keeping 3rd party hardware/software companies away.

The forking also needs to be tamed IMHO. I'm not against it, but I think it's being taken way too far IMO. Manjaro is a very good distribution and is a pretty good one if you want to try your hand at gaming on Linux. Despite this, someone, or someones took it upon themselves and forked Manjaro and made a "gaming version." I mean WHY, WHY is this stupidity happening. There is no need for a "gaming" fork of Manjaro. Here is an idea, if you like Manjaro and yo u want to help, why not work/help the Manjario devs instead of doing your own thing? While Linux has come a longs ways, I too feel that it would progress even further if people would just work together instead of constantly forking stuff and going it alone.

Now, dual booting. How difficult is it, keeping in mind I break into a cold sweat and have heart palpitations just restoring a backup? I know there's something about needing to partition, and understand Gparted can do that during the installation. I also have a fresh backup created just in case, and with me just in case is almost a guarantee.
There's some pretty good YouTube video showing how to do this. You can use a separate partition on your drive, or if you have separate drive you can install it there.Another option would be to run Windows in a VM (like VirtualBox) and do it that way. Only benefit of dual booting is if you need direct access to the hardware for more performance, but if your programs don't require such access a VM is a great option, simpler too.

Stops being the case when normal user wants to use Word.
Windows is inescapable. Embrace Microsoft and do away with Linux communism.
Bah I can't escape them, darn you MS (shake fists).

There are some things that MS has that Linux has no equal in terms of program capabilities, Office being one of them. What I will say though, depending what you are looking to get out of your office program, LibreOffice may be more than enough. However, if you need more advanced features (macros and such), MS Office is still king. Me personally I rarely use Office on a daily basis at home, so for me, LibreOffice is fine. While not as full featured as the desktop version of Office, one could also use the web version of Office if they wanted to stay in that ecosystem. Assuming they don't need access to the stuff in the desktop version.
 
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Chuck57

Level 3
Verified
Okay, I did it. I can now dual boot MX Linux and Windows 10. Haven't checked yet to see if Win 10 will boot, but I'm sure it will. It only took me 5 hrs to figure it out. The reason, which I finally discovered, is this thing had 4 partitions and no more could be created. Once that sunk in and after half a pack of cigarettes and several cups of coffee, the install took between 10 and 15 minutes. Even got the 186 updates installed without a problem.
 
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