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plat1098

Level 27
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Sep 13, 2018
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Wow, another casualty of supply-chain problems and "celebrities" cashing in on the beauty industry--driving the old timers to the side. But this was unexpected--I thought more Maybelline but obviously not!

 

plat1098

Level 27
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Sep 13, 2018
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Finally, a dim hope for the future of the ghastly styrofoam plastic waste: everywhere. Oceans, beaches, central Brooklyn where I live. First thing I thought of was huge factory-like plants containing nothing but worms. However, it's the digestive enzyme scientists are after.

Please, please let this catch on and take off. 🤞


Australian scientists have found the Zophobas morio - commonly known as a superworm - can survive on a diet of polystyrene.
They believe the beetle larvae digest the plastic through a gut enzyme.
That could be significant for advancements in recycling, says one of the study's authors.
"Superworms are like mini recycling plants, shredding the polystyrene with their mouths and then feeding it to the bacteria in their gut," Dr Chris Rinke said.
The University of Queensland team fed three groups of superworms different diets over three weeks. The batch that ate polystyrene even put on weight.
 

brambedkar59

Level 24
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Apr 16, 2017
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An article in the journal Astronomy and Astrophysics says that the planet may have become its ginormous, monstrous self by eating other planets.
The paper suggests that Jupiter has the remains of other planets hidden inside it. While the theory that Jupiter was born out of other planets has been around for a while, a clearer picture was revealed after the planet’s infamous gases temporarily parted and Nasa’s Juno space probe was able to get some data about its core.