Update Windows 11 - First look

upnorth

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How to Enable TPM on MSI Motherboards Featuring TPM 2.0

By Manny Chang|July 06,2021

Microsoft recently announced Windows 11 and one of its system requirements is TPM 2.0. Thus, many people are now asking questions like “does my PC support TPM 2.0?” or “is a discrete TPM 2.0 module mandatory for installing Windows 11?” A TPM 2.0 module is not mandatory on motherboards newer than Intel 100 series and AMD 300 series motherboards. TPM 2.0 related technologies are available in Intel chipsets newer than 100 series and AMD Ryzen processors. It can be enabled by simply enabling “PTT” or “AMD CPU fTPM” in "Security Device Support" in BIOS.

Here is a complete list of all MSI motherboards with TPM 2.0 support. Please note that this is not a list of Windows 11 compatible motherboards but rather a list of motherboards in which their BIOS supports TPM 2.0. https://download.msi.com/archive/mnu_exe/pdf/2021/msi-tpm-2-0-motherboard-list.pdf
 

Gandalf_The_Grey

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The Windows 11 insider build is surprisingly unpolished and unfinished:
First of all, we want to stress that bugs and even system lockups in this early build should not be taken as foreshadowing the final, released product—Windows 11 is still alpha software, so bugs and weirdness are to be expected. Although Windows 11 is clearly nowhere near ready for prime time yet, the early build gives us a good idea of where it's headed.

Windows 11 doesn't seem much, if any, more resource hungry than Windows 10—at first boot to the desktop, a Windows 11 VM with 4GiB of RAM is using 2.3GiB. It also boots quickly—in general, it seems a bit quicker to get to the login screen than Windows 10 was, though a little slower to reach the actual desktop. But we expect this will vary more widely by what applications users have installed than it does by operating system version.

Once the bugs are fixed, we expect Windows 11 to be a worthwhile upgrade from 10—an upgrade of approximately the same magnitude as the one from Windows 7 to Windows 10. It's difficult to imagine any of 11's new features confusing many users, although users may need a dash of extra help discovering those features in the first place.

On the flip side, users with older systems that don't meet Windows 11's notoriously stringent hardware requirements shouldn't feel too left out—while 11's new features are nice, we didn't see anything we couldn't live without.
 

Gandalf_The_Grey

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Windows 11 early review - Shiny, inefficient, confusing:
Conclusion
I find the whole early Windows 11 experience quite odd. The operating system does some things rather decently. Seamless upgrade, my apps and permissions were preserved, I can even run KompoZer from 2008 without any problems. Better system settings and all that. But then, why ruin all these good things with extra mouse clicks and a weird menu alignment? Or why add extra mouse clicks when they are not needed?

The one thing that dejects me is that I have to invest energy making things behave in an efficient way. Young people don't understand it yet, but time is the most precious commodity in the world. No matter how smart or rich you are, you get 80-90 years tops. Maybe a bit more, maybe a bit less. Why waste them clicking on an icon twice or three times or whatnot, when you can do it with less? Even more importantly, when you could do it with less! For example, what's so special about not allowing Explorer to point to a random disk location? How's Quick Launch threatening the grand business model?

Yes, at the end of the day, I got slightly different icons and colors, the menu is still where it belongs, and my battery indicator will probably be fixed some day. Using a Pro edition, I'll be able to avoid the online account nonsense, and I can pin the Show desktop icon onto the taskbar just fine. I ought to be happy, right? But not really. There isn't anything inherently wrong with Windows 11. But there's also no room left for useful invention in the desktop space. It's a formula that's 40 years old, and anything new is just noise. Move a button here, move it there.

This article is already too long, so let's bring it home. Windows 11 is a minor bump on top of Windows 10, featuring more visual contrast, more desktop inefficiency, and making a few nerdy things harder to achieve. It seems to aim at the app experience, but whether this will work out ... not likely. Win32 is still the king, and it will remain for a long, long time, because some fundamental needs are unassailable. As long as humans have 10 digits, and pixels are so tiny, there's only so much you can do with a screen and some software on it.

More to come. I will write some guides, and try the Home & online account thingie when possible.
 

mlnevese

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Interesting reads. I agree with some of the points made but I have to disagree about it being a complete disappointment, etc. It's quite more stable than I expected for a first public alpha version release. Some things need some getting used to.

Upgrade install was actually faster than I expected and saved most of my settings. But on an Alpha test you should expect settings being reset so that the telemetry and logs results you send through the Hub for instance, have any use to hunt for bugs.

Pinned apps on the start menu is actually very practical once you start using it, for instance.

I won't even comment about the bugs found. I EXPECT bugs in such an early Alpha version. That's why it's not in my work notebook or any other family computers. If I hit a bug that is a showstopper, I know how to deal with it. If it hits my work computer while I'm working, I don't want to stop to deal with it... If it hits my wife or kid's computers, I still know how to deal with it but now I have to do it while I have a furious wife/kids complaining :)

The centered start menu took me a few days to get used to but no big deal actually.

I have been talking about default programs preferences for a few days now... First release only had a protocol-based preference that wouldn't even accept non-Microsoft software. This week's update allows you to set any software and can set all protocols linked to it at once. It still lacks Windows 10 more practical, in my opinion, set default browser, mail, etc. page.

Microsoft has been bundling unwanted games with their home OS since at least Windows 95 and that is not likely to change. You don't want it, go use another OS or uninstall them because I don't see any chance of Microsoft changing their attitude.

Microsoft really needs to get rid of the Control Panel and centralize everything in the settings app, but they have been promising it since Windows 10.

Overall, I would say right now Windows 11 shows promise but, of course, it's unpolished and unfinished. They just announced the first bug squash week, so a new massive patch is in the near future.

Should you use it? Right now, I would say no unless you have a spare computer to use if some update BSODS Windows 11 or if some problem happens during install or if you are willing to run it in a VM. And image your system partition before upgrading. you may need it.
 
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plat1098

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Yes, agreed, mlnevese. It absolutely needs further refinements (File Explorer eg) and input via users in the DEV channel is crucial. No one (in his/her right mind) could have expected a finished product at initial release.

That said: Windows 11 is running nicely on here atm. That's the main thing--no "mechanical" issues right now. But if one cannot update right now, you are not missing very much, imo.
 

shmu26

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In my VM, it looked like it was using more RAM than Win10 did. No big deal, but one of the articles posted above didn't think it used more system resources, and explained: "at first boot to the desktop, a Windows 11 VM with 4GiB of RAM is using 2.3GiB."
That sounds not quite right to me, because I can boot a Win10 VM with 2 GB RAM. I can't do much on it, but I can boot it.
 

mlnevese

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In my VM, it looked like it was using more RAM than Win10 did. No big deal, but one of the articles posted above didn't think it used more system resources, and explained: "at first boot to the desktop, a Windows 11 VM with 4GiB of RAM is using 2.3GiB."
That sounds not quite right to me, because I can boot a Win10 VM with 2 GB RAM. I can't do much on it, but I can boot it.

With all the trash I allow to run at start it never went above 47% at boot in my test machine... Windows 10 was around the same so it doesn't seem to be more resource intensive than 10 until now.
 
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plat1098

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Ewww, they need to fix this. The two on the left are not aligned properly. The little square is actually Task Manager opened on the desktop. Note: this is with the icons centered on the taskbar. Icons positioned to the left results in all four aligned properly.

Edit: just re-adjusted the taskbar settings, now they're properly aligned again. Hmmm, must be a temporary glitch.

systray area.png
 

SeriousHoax

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Ewww, they need to fix this. The two on the left are not aligned properly. The little square is actually Task Manager opened on the desktop. Note: this is with the icons centered on the taskbar. Icons positioned to the left results in all four aligned properly.

Edit: just re-adjusted the taskbar settings, now they're properly aligned again. Hmmm, must be a temporary glitch.

It happened on mine too. Had to restart the system and 10 seconds after restarting it got fixed automatically.
 

silversurfer

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Microsoft introduces new keyboard shortcuts in Windows 11​

The following keyboard shortcuts are new in Windows 11 (thus far):
  • Windows-W opens the new Windows Widgets menu (the upgraded News and Interests feed that displays weather and news information among other things).
  • Windows-Z opens the new Snap layout options of windows. A layout pane is displayed in top right corner of the active window or application when the shortcut is invoked.
  • Windows-N opens the Notification Center of the operating system in the usual position on the screen.
Some sites reported that Windows-A is new as well. Windows-A opens the Quick Settings. This works similarly to clicking on the volume or network icons in the System Tray area. Quick Settings enable you to quickly toggle features such as Bluetooth, Wifi, flight mode and other features without going into the Settings.

The keyboard shortcut is not new as it is supported on Windows 10 as well, but it did display notifications and quick settings when used. In Windows 11, Windows-A will display the Quick Settings only while Windows-N will display the notification center.

Windows-W is the only shortcut of the three that is used on Windows 10 as well. It powers the Windows Ink workspace on Windows 10. Windows 10 users who use it need to find another way to open the workspace, as the shortcut has been remapped to open Windows Widgets.
 

show-Zi

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In Japan, it seems that .iso that has been tampered with so that it can be installed by bypassing the conditions is starting to appear on the market.

When I look at the bulletin boards in Japan, I often see comments complaining about the current win11, such as 'full of bugs' and 'doesn't work properly'. Everyone seems to have completely forgotten that it's an insider preview.
 

mlnevese

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In Japan, it seems that .iso that has been tampered with so that it can be installed by bypassing the conditions is starting to appear on the market.

When I look at the bulletin boards in Japan, I often see comments complaining about the current win11, such as 'full of bugs' and 'doesn't work properly'. Everyone seems to have completely forgotten that it's an insider preview.
People forget not only this is an insider preview but an alpha in the Dev channel, not even beta. Microsoft has tweeted we haven't seen everything, and new features will be released during the tests. Makes sense not wanting to test everything at once.
 

plat1098

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Well, Windows 11 is running very well on here. It's actually running better than some previous released Windows 10 builds, both performance- and error-wise.

For an alpha, you could do far worse than build 22000.65. Hopefully, others around here are experiencing the same or similar. It's very stable atm.

Now watch, I prolly jinxed something. :rolleyes::whistle::coffee:
 

show-Zi

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Guitarist win11 "Let's tune our guitar for the fall show."

Gallery "What a terrible noise! I like the steady sound of 21H1!"

Guitarist 21H1"All right! The sound got better from the middle of the live!"
♪♪♪
Gallery "There seems to be a promising new face named win11. Let's all go listen!"
21H1 "Hey! Don't go yet! My performance is not finished yet!"
 
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