Update Windows 11 - First look

roger_m

Level 34
Verified
Content Creator
Dec 4, 2014
2,326
Why bypass the requirements anyway?
Your system isn't supported and stuff will break soon or later.
Because I really wanted to try the new version of Windows. I also installed preview builds of Longhorn, Vista and Windows 10 when they became available. Anyway, as of right now, I don't think anyone other than Microsoft knows what the system requirements for Windows 11 are. Maybe I will encounter issues. Maybe I won't. I've installed this on a spare computer, just to try it. If I encounter issues it won't matter, as I'm using this computer solely to try Windows 11.
 

SeriousHoax

Level 37
Verified
Mar 16, 2019
2,658
Because I really wanted to try the new version of Windows. I also installed preview builds of Longhorn, Vista and Windows 10 when they became available. Anyway, as of right now, I don't think anyone other than Microsoft knows what the system requirements for Windows 11 are. Maybe I will encounter issues. Maybe I won't. I've installed this on a spare computer, just to try it. If I encounter issues it won't matter, as I'm using this computer solely to try Windows 11.
I'm sure the TPM requirements won't be mandatory when the official builds come out but I'm glad that people have found a way to bypass the requirements to install and test it on real devices. If it still doesn't then there's always a VM to test it out.
 

plat1098

Level 25
Verified
Sep 13, 2018
1,422
10 provide updates until 2025 so it's enough time to get supported hardware.

My motherboard is 10 months old and has no Trusted Platform Module--I have to purchase it and install it manually.

Don't have Secure Boot enabled either--it's an untested process on here and you can lock yourself out with one false move. It's not something that can be simply enabled with a toggle on here.

I understand the caution when it involves an ISO that isn't technically released yet but in this context, it's very annoying. Not all of us run OEM machines.

I bookmarked that video roger_m posted--I may use that route to bypass these obstacles at a later time.
 
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ForgottenSeer 85179

My motherboard is 10 months old and has no Trusted Platform Module--I have to purchase it and install it manually.
Sorry to say that but you're buy the wrong device. TPM is an standard for years.

Don't have Secure Boot enabled either--it's an untested process on here and you can lock yourself out with one false move.
SecureBoot is known well tested and highly recommended.

You can't lock out that easily. That's one of many misinformation from websites and random community's.

It's not something that can be simply enabled with a toggle on here.
Not sure what you're mean.
 

plat1098

Level 25
Verified
Sep 13, 2018
1,422
Sorry to say that but you're buy the wrong device. TPM is an standard for years.

Huh? No, this is a bare-bones motherboard, and the only suitable one in stock at the time (right in the middle of COVID lock-down). ASUS happens to sell the TPM separately,. I mean, how many people go out and buy computer parts with the single thought: hmm does this have TPM? Prob. not many at all. It's standard for Hewlett-Packard or Dell maybe.

tpm.PNG


There are four keys involved when it comes to Secure Boot on here. I have never "provisioned" the keys before. I'm concerned I may lock myself out of Windows if they're not done properly. It doesn't seem difficult but it's more of a procedure than simply going into your BIOS and enabling it with a click or whatever. I don't feel like doing this. It shouldn't be mandatory; it's my property and my responsibility--not Microsoft's or anyone else's.

This is not an argument, SecurityNightmares. But not everyone is running the exact same things. :):whistle::coffee:
 

show-Zi

Level 31
Verified
Jan 28, 2018
1,998
Because I really wanted to try the new version of Windows. I also installed preview builds of Longhorn, Vista and Windows 10 when they became available. Anyway, as of right now, I don't think anyone other than Microsoft knows what the system requirements for Windows 11 are. Maybe I will encounter issues. Maybe I won't. I've installed this on a spare computer, just to try it. If I encounter issues it won't matter, as I'm using this computer solely to try Windows 11.
I feel that your feelings can be understood by me. It's like finding a new cave and exploring the interior. Curiosity is also fun.:)
 
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ForgottenSeer 85179

I'm concerned I may lock myself out of Windows if they're not done properly. It doesn't seem difficult but it's more of a procedure than simply going into your BIOS and enabling it with a click or whatever
You can't lock out yourself with just activated TPM.
Also it is just a switch in bios and clicking on key rollout. That's all.
 

SeriousHoax

Level 37
Verified
Mar 16, 2019
2,658
Huh? No, this is a bare-bones motherboard, and the only suitable one in stock at the time (right in the middle of COVID lock-down). ASUS happens to sell the TPM separately,. I mean, how many people go out and buy computer parts with the single thought: hmm does this have TPM? Prob. not many at all. It's standard for Hewlett-Packard or Dell maybe.



There are four keys involved when it comes to Secure Boot on here. I have never "provisioned" the keys before. I'm concerned I may lock myself out of Windows if they're not done properly. It doesn't seem difficult but it's more of a procedure than simply going into your BIOS and enabling it with a click or whatever. I don't feel like doing this. It shouldn't be mandatory; it's my property and my responsibility--not Microsoft's or anyone else's.

This is not an argument, SecurityNightmares. But not everyone is running the exact same things. :):whistle::coffee:
I don't know about TPM. I don't have it on my entry-level motherboard and I am not going to spend extra money just for TPM. But the secure boot feature is safe. I never had any issue with it. You'll have to disable it if you install Linux or dual boot. Otherwise, there's no problem with it as far as I'm concerned.
 

SeriousHoax

Level 37
Verified
Mar 16, 2019
2,658
 

Freud2004

Level 9
Jun 26, 2020
409
Windows 11 its running in Windows 10 kernel, there ill be nothing from extraordinary in this new version. Personally I believe this is a way to promote a new version of the Windows store, new OS and a new store, in the end all the same things.
The good part, if Windows 11 is running in 10 kernel, there will be no problem with drivers.

1623968541039.png
 

Spawn

Administrator
Verified
Staff member
Jan 8, 2011
21,053
Edit: Now I understand why most videos said there was no local account option! Seems lots of them were using the Home version which is why it didn't show up?

source: Windows 11 Confirmed: What We Learned From the Leaked Build
Say you were to download the Home SKU ISO and enter your Microsoft account that's currently linked to a Pro SKU on Windows 10, does your Digital Entitlement license get downgraded?

Do you know if 32-bit has been killed off?
 
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SpiderWeb

Level 6
Aug 21, 2020
256
I came here to say GNOME coming to Windows but y'all beat me to it. It also reminds me of Chrome OS a lot. Microsoft, it's ok to admit you ran out of ideas. Don't change things for the sake of change. The UI design is so ridiculously inconsistent even in the few screenshots. This is going the way of Windows Me, Vista, 8.
As a rebuttal to what others have said in defense of the design nightmare that is Windows 11:

windows11.png


Source
 
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