Windows 11 - First look

rain2reign

Level 6
Jun 21, 2020
280
I still find Windows 11 too premature for its release intended on October 5th. Looks great and more responsive to me, but there is simply not enough stuff working under the surface to make it release worthy in my honest opinion. Basic features like the Taskbar drag and drop mentioned above in the HowToGeek article for example is one such thing. And yes, I do realize it's from Windows 10X, but if they want it in Windows 11 it should be part of the basic features that needs to work from day 1 and not for a delayed update.

Just my 2c overall.
 

amirr

Level 19
Verified
Jan 26, 2020
909
I still find Windows 11 too premature for its release intended on October 5th. Looks great and more responsive to me, but there is simply not enough stuff working under the surface to make it release worthy in my honest opinion. Basic features like the Taskbar drag and drop mentioned above in the HowToGeek article for example is one such thing. And yes, I do realize it's from Windows 10X, but if they want it in Windows 11 it should be part of the basic features that needs to work from day 1 and not for a delayed update.

Just my 2c overall.
Basic users do not care about Taskbar drag and drop, etc. I am happy that it will release on October 5, at least during this hectic time of COVID19 we will have something new, and that change is nice from time to time, helps with dopamine and all that.
 

roger_m

Level 34
Verified
Content Creator
Dec 4, 2014
2,354
Basic users do not care about Taskbar drag and drop
I'm an advanced user and have never used it.
What's the rush? I suppose for those with nothing better to do ... or who enjoy troubleshooting. ;) :LOL:
People like me. I fit both categories. :LOL:

I upgraded to Vista on the only computer I used at the time, as soon as prerelease versions became available. I did the same for Windows 10 on my main computer and a few others. I just like trying new things. But with Windows 11, only one of my computers, a very cheap used low powered laptop I just purchased from eBay, supports Windows 11. I'm going to wait to upgrade my main computer, to see if it will be able to get updates. If it won't, I'll stick with Windows 10 on that computer.
 

rain2reign

Level 6
Jun 21, 2020
280
I have had my fair share of troubleshooting Windows over the years and I can conclude I have terrible luck. Something always breaks or notice something is not right. More than often either get ignored by MS or they just close the ticket with a copy-paste reply "/scannow ......". Its a matter of experience and perspective, mostly.

Fortunately reinstalling Windows 10 is faster than troubleshooting Windows 10. 🤡
 

CyberTech

Level 36
Verified
Nov 10, 2017
2,501
Windows 11's general release is roughly 10 days away, and while it will not be available to everyone on October 5 due to a staggered rollout strategy, if you're eager to upgrade to the OS as soon as possible, you're also likely interested in what it has to offer. This is exactly what we have been covering in our ongoing Closer Look series over the past few weeks.

So far, we have taken a look at Search, Widgets, the Start menu, Snap Layouts and Snap Groups, the Taskbar, quick settings and notifications, Virtual Desktops, power and battery settings, default apps configurations, File Explorer, and context menus in Windows 11. Today, we'll be taking a look at the deeper integration of Microsoft Teams with Windows 11. While we did discuss it before, that was from a hands-on perspective two months ago, so it's worth discussing it in terms of features and an overall end-user experience.

Unlike previous Closer Look articles where we compared the upcoming OS' capabilities with its predecessor, we'll only be discussing Microsoft Teams' integration with Windows 11 this time. This is because Teams is offered as a standalone app in Windows 10 and isn't installed by default. Windows 11 does not install Skype automatically either. So the two implementations are fairly independent.


Full article, more screenshots, features and etc
 

silversurfer

Level 75
Verified
Trusted
Content Creator
Malware Hunter
Aug 17, 2014
6,443
MediaCreationTool,bat is a useful script for Windows to download Windows ISO images from Microsoft servers. The developer has updated the program recently; the latest release introduces support for downloading Windows 11 ISO images and includes a standalone script to toggle the Windows 11 compatibility checks during setup.
 

SeriousHoax

Level 38
Verified
Mar 16, 2019
2,740
Any downloading attempt made by the script is being blocked by Bitdefender. BD is not at fault here. It's perfectly doing its job. Scripts like this should look suspicious to the behavior blocker. So things like this either needs to be whitelisted by the AV vendor or by the user. It's a safe malware free script which I used previously when Windows 21H1 came out.
b1.pngb2.pngb3.png
 

LASER_oneXM

Level 37
Verified
Feb 4, 2016
2,596
A new script allows you to install Windows 11 on devices with incompatible hardware, such as missing TPM 2.0, incompatible CPUs, or the lack of Secure Boot. Even better, the script also works on virtual machines, allowing you to upgrade to the latest Windows Insider build.

When Windows 11 was first announced, Microsoft released the operating system's new system requirements, which included a TPM 2.0 security processor, Secure Boot, newer CPUs, and at least 64 GB of hard drive space.

As Microsoft realized that many people, especially those in the enterprise, would be testing Windows 11 preview builds on virtual machines, they exempted them from the system requirements.

However, Microsoft is now requiring compatible hardware even on virtual machines and taking a firm stance on its system requirement, going as far as to say that people who install Windows 11 on incompatible hardware may not get security updates.

For those willing to risk running Windows 11 on incompatible hardware, a script has been released that allows new installations and upgrades to bypass the operating system's system requirements.

 

Local Host

Level 24
Verified
Sep 26, 2017
1,324
This the type of tools that make companies patch holes and have been used for years with no repercussions.

There no need for it either, as there's already alternatives, simply not targeted at bypassing W11 requirements (but work).

Microsoft can easily block that, and will probably do it because of that tool now.
 
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SeriousHoax

Level 38
Verified
Mar 16, 2019
2,740

amirr

Level 19
Verified
Jan 26, 2020
909
"Why?
Today virtually every Windows or software download site has posted about a new Windows 11 Media Creation Tool program that allows you to bypass hardware/TPM checks. Yeah that’s cool. But why would anyone want to use this?
Microsoft has set the hardware requirements there for a reason. People who use this will then whine about Windows 11 not working as it should. Windows 10 doesn’t reach End of Life for 4 more years. Even if you don’t mind Windows 11’s horrendous user interface, why the hurry to use an alpha grade OS?"
 
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