Windows 11 - First look

ng4ever

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I hate this new feature of Windows 11 for default apps. :(

default apps horrible.jpg


Windows 10 on the left. Windows 11 on the right.
 

Local Host

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I hate this new feature of Windows 11 for default apps. :(

View attachment 261953

Windows 10 on the left. Windows 11 on the right.
Windows 11 has been a step back in general, lots of usability and costumization lost.

I feel like I'm back on Windows XP (it wasn't bad), but lots of improvements were made since then to improve usability, and Microsoft dropped all that with Windows 11.

Adding insult to injury they couldn't even finish Windows 11 as I expected, is still a mix of old and new.
 

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Gandalf_The_Grey

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Five things I love about Windows 11
Windows 11 became generally available over a month ago but it's been rolling out in a staggered manner so not everyone has received it yet. We've been taking a look at a lot of the OS' notable features as part of our Closer Look series in case you want to have an in-depth look at the smaller upgrades and changes.

Now that we've discussed most, if not all, of the new capabilities of Windows 11, I'd like to talk about my top five favorite updates. I also want to emphasize that the list below is not in descending order, rather, it's just a collection of five items that I appreciate because they improve my workflow and user experience. Not everyone else may feel the same way about them. With that said, here we go!
 

CyberTech

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A few days back, Microsoft released its Insider build 22000.346 to the Beta and the Release Preview channels. And among the many changes and fixes it brought, like those for printer issues, it also noted that the firm was revertingto the color blue for its stop error screen, which is more commonly called the Blue Screen of Death (BSOD).

The changelog point denoting this reads:
We changed the screen color to blue when a device stops working or a stop error occurs as in previous versions of Windows.

Microsoft has used the blue color for a long time now but switched it to black when it launched the insider preview builds of Windows 11. Other than the color of the background itself though, there wasn't anything else that was different with the black BSOD. Hence, switching it back to blue was probably not too difficult for the Redmond giant.

If you recall, the company made a similar change back in 2016 when it had introduced the Green Screen of Death for Insider preview builds. According to Microsoft, this was done to make it easier to distinguish errors on preview builds from final stable versions. And the company may have applied somewhat of the same reasoning here too for the Windows 11 previews.

The first GA of Windows 11 has long been out and so Microsoft may have felt it was time to get back the BSOD to its blue roots. However, there could be some other reason too that we aren't aware of.
 

silversurfer

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Microsoft has started rolling out a new Media Player app for Windows 11 to insiders in Dev Channel through Microsoft Store. The app replaces Groove Music and it can play local audio and video media.
Known issues:
As of now, there is an issue with
  • playback from network locations
  • editing album metadata.
  • Sorting library content with accented characters
  • Media Player UI elements do not respect app theme preference. For instance, it doesn’t honor Windows 11 dark mode by default.
 

CyberTech

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Microsoft released the 1.0 stable version of Windows App SDK a couple of days ago and the Windows developer team decided to conduct an AUA (Ask Us Anything) about it on the Windows 11 subreddit. During the session, when some users complained about some of the sluggish UI performance instances on Windows 11, the Windows developer team confirmed that it is indeed working to address such issues in 2022. This means next year's Windows 11 22H2 feature update could bring a faster overall UI interaction response and performance if things do indeed pan out as Microsoft claims.

Performance will be an area of focus for us in 2022. A lot of that focus will go into startup/launch perf; in terms of UI elements rendering on the screen (after the framework is loaded), we've tested the scalability of doing things like putting 10k buttons on the screen, etc. Most of the UI elements render pretty quickly already, but it would be good to understand if there are specific UI element scaling/slowness issues you're experiencing and we could take a look into that specific scenario.

[...] Internally, in addition to wanting to focus some of our our UX framework's time on perf in 2022, we also have a dedicated team formed recently to tackle this topic more holistically. So there's multiple things we're collectively doing here to try and make sure we have a good perf story.

The rest
 

silversurfer

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An Intel sound driver is behind a Windows 11 BSOD, Microsoft posts workaround​

This week, Microsoft added a compatibility problem with the Intel Smart Sound Technology driver to its list of known issues in Windows 11. In addition to causing blue screens, the bug may prevent users from upgrading from Windows 10 to Windows 11.

Microsoft says the affected driver is located in Device Manager > System Devices under Intel Smart Sound Technology (Intel SST) Audio Controller. The file name should be IntcAudioBus.sys, and the file version should be either 10.29.0.5152 and earlier or 10.30.0.5152 and earlier.

It's important to note that versions starting with 10.30 aren't necessarily newer than those starting with 10.29. It can be a bit counterintuitive, but the two appear to be from separate version histories. When looking at the files, the last section of numbers—the "5152," is the most important. Microsoft's workaround is to upgrade those drivers to version 10.29.00.5714 and 10.30.00.5714. You'll have to check with your computer's manufacturer for those drivers.
 

The_King

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Microsoft: Windows Installer breaks apps after updates, repairs​

Microsoft has confirmed a new known issue impacting client and server Windows versions that breaks apps after updating or repairing them using the Windows Installer (previously known as Microsoft Installer).

This issue affects systems where Windows users have installed cumulative updates released during this month's Patch Tuesday.
After installing one of these updates, "Microsoft Installer (MSI) might have issues repairing or updating apps," the company says on the Windows Health dashboard.
"Apps that are known to be affected include some apps from Kaspersky. Affected apps might fail to open after an update or repair has been attempted."
The complete list of Windows versions affected by this known issue includes:
  • Client: Windows 11, version 21H2; Windows 10, version 21H2; Windows 10, version 21H1; Windows 10, version 20H2; Windows 10, version 2004; Windows 10, version 1909; Windows 10, version 1809; Windows 10 Enterprise LTSC 2019; Windows 10 Enterprise LTSC 2016; Windows 10, version 1607; Windows 10 Enterprise 2015 LTSB; Windows 8.1; Windows 7 SP1
  • Server: Windows Server 2022; Windows Server, version 20H2; Windows Server, version 2004; Windows Server, version 1909; Windows Server, version 1809; Windows Server 2019; Windows Server 2016; Windows Server 2012 R2; Windows Server 2012; Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1; Windows Server 2008 SP2

Windows 11 known issues and safeguards​

Microsoft is also working on a resolution for another issue impacting Windows 11 customers that leads to blue screens of death (BSODs) on affected systems.
The new issue is caused by compatibility issues between integrated Intel Smart Sound Technology (SST) audio DSP drivers and Windows 11, version 21H2.
Redmond has also added an update block to prevent devices with impacted Intel SST drivers from being offered the Windows 11 upgrade.

Right now, there're only two Windows 11 compatibility holds, with the other one blocking the upgrade from being offered to eligible systems running Oracle VirtualBox when Hyper-V or Windows Hypervisor are also installed.
 

silversurfer

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Microsoft: Windows Installer breaks apps after updates, repairs​


New Windows 11 build fixes Microsoft Installer issue breaking apps
Microsoft has fixed a recently confirmed Windows 11 issue in a newly released build for Windows Insiders in the Beta and Release Preview channels.

"We fixed a known issue that might prevent apps, such as Kaspersky apps, from opening after you attempt to repair or update the apps using the Microsoft Installer (MSI)," the Windows Insider Program Team said.
 

Gandalf_The_Grey

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Five things I hate about Windows 11
Windows 11 has been out for over a month, but due to its staggered rollout, it's not available to everyone just yet. While Microsoft recently stated that it's speeding up the pace of availability due to "positive" feedback regarding the OS, that doesn't mean that Windows 11 is perfect. Far from it, in fact. If you've read my review on the OS, you know that I find it to be a mixed bag overall.

Last week, I talked about the top five things I love about Windows 11, but today, I'm going on the opposite extreme and will be talking about five things I hate about Microsoft's latest operating system. As usual, this is a purely personal perspective so feel free to disagree with it. Another few things I'd like to emphasize are that this list is in no particular order and the OS possibly has other problems apart from the ones I mention too, I just don't feel that strongly about them. With that out of the way, let's begin!
 

amirr

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Gandalf_The_Grey

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How to change the look and feel of Windows 11
On Windows 11, you can customize many settings to change the desktop's appearance and other elements to make the experience a little more personal or quickly refresh the feel to avoid the same look every day.

Although the experience is not as customizable as on Windows 10, you can still change the desktop background with a personal picture or a theme from the Microsoft Store. You can switch between the dark and light color modes or use a custom accent color across the desktop. You can organize your favorite apps in the Start menu. And you can change the alignment of the Taskbar, decide what items appear in the experience, tweak the system tray settings, and a lot more.

In this Windows 11 guide, we will walk you through the different ways to customize the appearance to make your computer experience a little more personal.