CyberTech

Level 23
Verified
The Directorate General for Competition, Consumption and the Suppression of Fraud (DGCCRF), which is part of the country's economy ministry, concluded that Apple had failed to inform users that iOS updates to older iPhones could slow down their devices.

The DGCCRF revealed its findings in a Friday press release:
"Following an investigation by the Directorate General for Competition, Consumption and the Suppression of Fraud (DGCCRF) and after the agreement of the Public Prosecutor of Paris, the Apple group agreed to pay a fine of 25 M € in the context of a criminal transaction.

"Seized on January 5, 2018 by the Paris Prosecutor's Office to investigate the complaint of an association against Apple, the DGCCRF has shown that ‌iPhone‌ owners were not informed that the updates of the iOS operating system (10.2.1 and 11.2) they installed were likely to slow down the operation of their device.

"These updates, released during 2017, included a dynamic power management device which, under certain conditions and especially when the batteries were old, could slow down the functioning of the ‌iPhone‌ 6, SE models. and 7."
The investigation followed Apple's admission in 2017 that it slows down some older iPhones with degraded batteries during times of peak power usage in order to prevent unexpected shutdowns.

When the ‌iPhone‌ slowdown controversy was at its height, Apple apologized for its lack of communication and offered affected customers cut-price iPhone battery replacements. The company has always maintained that the features are designed to preserve the life of the ‌iPhone‌ for as long as possible, and were not implemented to force upgrades.

That being said, Apple has accepted an agreement with France's public prosecutor to pay the fine of 25 million euros and to publish a press release on its website for one month.
 

MacDefender

Level 4
Verified
Note that they didn't get fined for slowing down the phones per se, they got fined for failing to communicate this impact to customers. It's still not illegal in any jurisdiction to push software updates that degrade the performance/capacity of a device to deal with unavoidable aging, but it is the kind of thing you need to be transparent and communicate to customers.
 
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Umbra

Level 25
Verified
Some people fails to see it is just a fine, like getting a fine when ignoring a red light. Not supposed to destroy Apple... Just warning them.
And 25millions is still 25millions loss, but real cost is that users knows that is was with purpose and may not trust Apple or planned to upgrade to a new iPhone.
Bad advertisement always had an impact.
 
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MacDefender

Level 4
Verified
Some people fails to see it is just a fine, like getting a define when ignoring a red light. Not supposed to destroy Apple... Just warning them.
And 25millions is still 25millions loss, but real cost is that users knows that is was with purpose and may not trust Apple or planned to upgrade to a new iPhone.
Bad advertisement always had an impact.
Even if the money aspect seems like a slap on the wrist, it is in no company's best interest to be labeled as committing a crime, which is what happened in this case.

Just like what you said, a cell phone or speeding ticket, even if it doesn't break the bank, is likely to change your behavior.