CyberTech

Level 21
Verified
Two-factor authentication is one of the best ways to keep your accounts protected, and just like most of the tech companies, Apple itself is also offering such a feature to its users.

And yet, New York-based Apple customer Jay Brodsky believes that two-factor authentication is a huge headache, and he is now sending the Cupertino-based firm to court because users aren’t allowed to disable this feature after two weeks.

Brodsky claims Apple violates the U.S. Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, California's Invasion of Privacy Act, and he explains in court documents that two-factor authentication causes “economic losses,” not only to him, but also to “millions of similarly situated consumers across the nation.”

As noted by MacRumors, there are some uncanny mentions in the lawsuit documents, including that Apple enabled two-factor authentication on Apple IDs with a software update around September 2015. In reality, this security feature is offered as optional and users need to manually turn it on.

Two-factor authentication required when setting up devices
Furthermore, the man accuses Apple of making it harder to use devices, as two-factor authentication is enabled when products like iPhone and Macs are turned on. This isn’t the case, as the feature is only required when setting up the device and configuring an Apple account for the first time.

Apple explains in support documents that two-factor authentication is required because other features in its operating systems, both on mobile and PCs, need it to ensure that the data isn’t exposed.

“Certain features in the latest versions of iOS and macOS require this extra level of security, which is designed to protect your information. If you recently updated your account, you can unenroll for two weeks. Just open your enrollment confirmation email and click the link to return to your previous security settings. Keep in mind, this makes your account less secure and means that you can't use features that require higher security,” Apple says.

Needless to say, there’s basically no chance for Apple to lose this case, not only because it includes so many debatable allegations, but also because two-factor authentication itself is actually a useful implementation that everyone should use.
 

Vasudev

Level 28
Verified
They got dinged pretty hard with the celeb iCloud hacking scandal, of course they want to improve their security. What a dumb lawsuit.
Locking out authentic users in case of emergencies is not a good thing at all!
Suppose you're having an heart attack and accidentally you press a wrong app icon and it suddenly opens up saying Different IP detected and wait for 2FA email and overlay won't be dismissed and in that moment Home button or Swipe up won't work because the user is dead.
 

dash

Level 4
Locking out authentic users in case of emergencies is not a good thing at all!
Suppose you're having an heart attack and accidentally you press a wrong app icon and it suddenly opens up saying Different IP detected and wait for 2FA email and overlay won't be dismissed and in that moment Home button or Swipe up won't work because the user is dead.
Good point.