New Update Built-in ChatGPT-driven Copilot will transform Windows 11 starting in June

MuzzMelbourne

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A couple of months ago, Microsoft added generative AI features to Windows 11 in the form of a taskbar-mounted version of the Bing chatbot. Starting this summer, the company will be going even further, adding a new ChatGPT-driven Copilot feature that can be used alongside your other Windows apps. The company announced the change at its Build developer conference alongside another new batch of Windows 11 updates due later this year. Windows Copilot will be available to Windows Insiders starting in June.

New Windows 11 update puts AI-powered Bing Chat directly in the taskbar
Like the Microsoft 365 Copilot, Windows Copilot is a separate window that opens up along the right side of your screen and assists with various tasks based on what you ask it to do. A Microsoft demo video shows Copilot changing Windows settings, rearranging windows with Snap Layouts, summarizing and rewriting documents that were dragged into it, and opening apps like Spotify, Adobe Express, and Teams. Copilot is launched with a dedicated button on the taskbar.
 

oldschool

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Captain Holly

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I guess if people really want all these AI features and having MS even more involved in their online activity, that's up to them. Me personally, I am not in the leaset interested in AI or any of this other whiz-bang MS stuff. I was trying to stay with MS but it looks more and more like I will be making a permanent switch to Linux. I don't need and don't want chat gpt or any of that other crap. I just want to use the internet and a few useful apps. I must be one of the users that want to use stuff.

No thanks MS. Don't force your newfangled world on me. Please. I am not interested.

C.H.
 

MuzzMelbourne

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... I will be making a permanent switch to Linux. I don't need and don't want chat gpt or any of that other crap. I just want to use the internet and a few useful apps. I must be one of the users that want to use stuff...

C.H.
The Ultimate Linux Distro(with a twist or two).
apple_logo_PNG19689.png
 

Gandalf_The_Grey

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Hands-On with Windows Copilot (Preview)
Yesterday, Microsoft released the first public version of the Windows Copilot (Preview) to a small subset of Windows Insiders in the Dev channel. I installed this build on three separate PCs, one physical and two in VMs, but none of them had Copilot enabled. And so I enlisted the help of Rafael to unlock the feature.

Long story short, you need to download Vivetool to the PC on which you installed the build, extract its contents to a folder, open Terminal with administrator privileges, navigate to the extracted folder, and then use the following command:

>./vivetool /enable /id:44774629,44850061,44776738,42105254,41655236

Then, reboot the PC. When you sign in again, you will see a new blue icon in the Taskbar for Windows Copilot that looks a little too much like the icon for the Microsoft 365 app.
Overall, I have to say that this is unimpressive. But it’s early days, and Microsoft says that it will add new features and add an extensibility model over time. Microsoft also says that this thing will display advertising, or as it calls it, “inline recommendations we think are relevant through ads in Bing.” So this thing is being enshittified even in preview. Fantastic.
 

Gandalf_The_Grey

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Hands-on with Windows Copilot: A buggy mess that will (hopefully) get better with time
After using Copilot extensively for a day, I am quite impressed at what Microsoft has built and it could have a bright future ahead. As someone who grew up with Clippy, I do like the idea of having an AI assistant at beck and call, assisting me with work. At the same time, I wish Microsoft adds a way to have Copilot execute actions without giving confirmation prompts. This waters the whole point of having an assistant take actions on your behalf.

Moreover, the random bugs and glitches here and there can get frustrating at times. The fact that Copilot is still restricted to 30 queries, like Bing, is something that I am unable to understand. It takes away the point of having an assistant that can answer all the questions and help with real life problems.

All this combined with no voice typing (even though Bing Chat supports it) and offline support really kills the whole point of having Copilot to the side. While, it is understandable that most of the questions will require an internet connection to fetch details, Copilot could easily execute commands related to Windows without requiring an internet connection, something it fails to achieve in its current state.

Having said that, I do appreciate what Microsoft is trying to do with Copilot even if it is buggy and messy at times. In its current shape, Copilot is probably more suited for novices but if Microsoft spends time on it, Copilot could become an integral part of Windows ecosystem and hopefully work in tandem with third-party apps and services as well.
 

Gandalf_The_Grey

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First look at Windows Copilot: It's actually just Microsoft Edge, not Windows 11
Because it is an Edge feature, the interface doesn't really feel native to Windows at all. It's clearly a website, and while Microsoft could do work to make it look more native (like adding acrylic blur effects to the sidebar) it's never going to feel like a native Windows feature.

Could Microsoft change this in the future? Maybe. Will it? Probably not. There's a reason Microsoft opted to make this an Edge feature, and it's all to do with upsell and being able to claim that Edge usage is up as a result of users now using it when accessing the Windows Copilot.

I'm not inherently against web-based app experiences, but I am when it comes to Windows features. I am fine with the new Outlook being a WebView app, but I am not a fan of Windows Widgets, Windows Search, and now Windows Copilot being a WebView app. These should be using native Windows UI frameworks.

Overall, my first impressions of the Windows Copilot are disappointing. Right now, due to its limited capabilities as a "Windows" feature, the Copilot button is nothing more than a shortcut to Bing.com. I'm hopeful that over time its capabilities will grow to differentiate it from the Bing Chat website, but that's not going to change how I feel about it being an Edge feature at its core.

 

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Cortana has stopped working on Windows 11, and Microsoft plans to kill off the app on Windows 10 within a few days, a source close to the company confirmed. Instead, anyone who wants an assistant or copilot for their desktops should use the Windows Copilot, which is arriving with the Windows 11 23H2 update.

“We are making some changes to Windows that will impact users of the Cortana app. Starting in August 2023, we will no longer support Cortana in Windows as a standalone app. However, you can still access powerful productivity features in Windows and Edge, which have increased AI capabilities,” Microsoft noted in the document spotted by Windows Latest.
 

Trident

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Techradar highly praises Copilot.

On copying text, Copilot has suggested to revise, summarise, expand and explain. Upon copying a picture of a dish, it has identified it and found a recipe.

I personally don’t find this form of masquerading spyware impressive. I use digital assistants only to set an alarm and turn my lights off when I am in bed.

 

vtqhtr413

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But what if you're unsure about the update, specifically about Copilot? After all, among its features is the ability to give you personalized answers on web searches, help organize and better search your files on File Explorer, and analyze and even write emails for you. To do this, Copilot accesses your data. According to Microsoft, the large language models that the AI uses are not trained on your data, and Microsoft complies with European Union data protection boundaries and General Data Protection Regulations. Still, if the idea of an AI scouting your data is not appealing, here is how you can disable Microsoft Copilot in Windows 11.

In order to remove Copilot from the Windows Taskbar, first:
  1. Open Settings.
  2. Click on Personalization.
  3. Select the Taskbar page on the right side.
  4. Find the Taskbar items settings, then turn off the Copilot (preview) switch.
While this removes the Copilot button, you can still use the chatbot by pressing the Windows key+C. In order to fully disable the AI tool, you have to use the Group Policy Editor if your device has Windows 11 ProEnterprise or Education, then:
  1. Open Group Policy User Configuration.
  2. Select Administrative Templates.
  3. Go to Windows Components.
  4. Select Windows Copilot.
  5. Set Turn off Windows Copilot to Enabled.
If you have Windows 11 Home, then you have to modify the Registry to disable Copilot. Be aware that changing the Registry can lead to bigger issues, so make sure to set up a System Restore backup, which is an important tool when using Windows 11. Then you can proceed like so:
  1. On the Search Bar, search Regedit to open the Registry Editor.
  2. Write the following path: "HKEY_CURRENT_USERSoftwarePoliciesMicrosoftWindowsWindowsCopilot"
  3. Double-click the TurnOffWindowsCopilot DWORD and change the value from 0 to 1.
  4. Click OK.
That will disable Copilot completely from the Windows 11 Registry as well as from the Taskbar.
 

adyextreme01

New Member
Feb 17, 2024
2
I guess if people really want all these AI features and having MS even more involved in their online activity, that's up to them. Me personally, I am not in the leaset interested in AI or any of this other whiz-bang MS stuff. I was trying to stay with MS but it looks more and more like I will be making a permanent switch to Linux. I don't need and don't want chat gpt or any of that other crap. I just want to use the internet and a few useful apps. I must be one of the users that want to use stuff.

No thanks MS. Don't force your newfangled world on me. Please. I am not interested.

C.H.
ah if you know how it speeds up productivity you won't think like this. the 15th gen intel CPUs will have ai cores so it will be useful also offline. and if you have arm hardware well those have AI cores for ages y mean on phones, we had ai for ages well the free version might not get as good but the played version, that is another story it can easily generate PowerShell scripts, edit photos compose emails get the best deals in shopping in no time. y have both chat gpt and windows copilot and you can automate everting if you combine with power automate
 

adyextreme01

New Member
Feb 17, 2024
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