Nagisa

Level 1
Even if I'm using a relatively powerfull pc than most of the moderate home PCs, Windows 10 literally killing my machine. I know, this is mostly because I don't use any SSD, but It still disgusting to see how the applications response so slowly on my machine. The computers at my schools, some of them have pentium and some of them have Core2Q, and all of them have 5400 RPM harddisk. And they are nearly 1.5x as fast when it comes to basic things such as browsing on explorer.exe. It's really disgusting.

I'm considering to go back to the windows 7 but I don't know if it's acceptable for a moderate security. I'm normally using 360TS + voodooshield + osarmor on my Windows 10. What do you suggest?
 

Moonhorse

Level 25
Content Creator
Verified
You can always go linux, except youre a gamer...i doubt that because you run such an old pc build:unsure:

Its more secure than windows 7 or 10(?) atleast and has everything you need for basic networking

Installing linux is similar to windows, you just make .ISO....its aswell possible to run linux on side while you have Windows 7/10 installed already
 

Local Host

Level 14
Verified
You shouldn't have problems running Windows 10 on a HDD.

I'm yet to see a PC using SSD in most companies I been at, and all of them run Windows 10 with no issues, adding to that Windows 10 has exactly the same systems requirements as Windows 7.

Keep in mind the first days Windows 10 could be performing tasks like updates in the background.
 

Spawn

Administrator
Staff member
Verified
You can add any 3rd party security to Windows 7, but essentially Windows 10 is more secure than any previous versions. Windows 10 has security features added at a kernel and API level, which Windows 7 simply does not have.

PDF Link: Webroot 2018 Threat Report - "Windows 10 is almost twice as safe as Windows 7"

If you want to keep using Windows 7, use it. Users will continuously throw Windows 10 under the bus over "weak detection", "privacy-issues", or whatever other BS they can exaggerate as an excuse.

I'm considering to go back to the windows 7 but I don't know if it's acceptable for a moderate security. I'm normally using 360TS + voodooshield + osarmor on my Windows 10. What do you suggest?
To discuss Security Config, open a thread at Computer Security Configuration
 

shmu26

Level 78
Content Creator
Trusted
Verified
Even if I'm using a relatively powerfull pc than most of the moderate home PCs, Windows 10 literally killing my machine. I know, this is mostly because I don't use any SSD, but It still disgusting to see how the applications response so slowly on my machine. The computers at my schools, some of them have pentium and some of them have Core2Q, and all of them have 5400 RPM harddisk. And they are nearly 1.5x as fast when it comes to basic things such as browsing on explorer.exe. It's really disgusting.

I'm considering to go back to the windows 7 but I don't know if it's acceptable for a moderate security. I'm normally using 360TS + voodooshield + osarmor on my Windows 10. What do you suggest?
It sounds like your computer has some issues, maybe hardware, maybe drivers. It should not be so slow.
 

devjit2018

Level 8
I feel you bro. I have a windows 10 pc in our office which has an i3, 8GB RAM and a 1 TB HDD. It just literally takes around 5 minutes to go to the desktop and the disk usage constantly pegs at 100% after booting for the first 10 minutes. I did a clean install last week and disabled automatic updates but still the pc is way too slow. If you have a modern Intel or AMD processor you'll have to slipstream the USB 3.0 drivers to the windows 7 ISO else you won't be able to install 7. As far as security is concerned, 10 is obviously more secure. 7 will get updates till 14 Jan 2020. If you're a safe user, 7 will be okay.
 

shmu26

Level 78
Content Creator
Trusted
Verified
I was told that the best way is to use Windows-provided drivers, which are regularly updated, not the manufacturer-provided drivers which are often terribly outdated.
Only use a manufacturer driver if you have an issue with the Windows-provided driver.