Serious Discussion Matter - The new Smart Home standard (v1.2 spec)

Ink

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Article: Which products should you buy if you want a Matter smart home?

Matter is an interoperability standard designed to solve many of today’s smart home headaches.
Developed and run by the Connectivity Standards Alliance, Matter is supported by a long list of companies. From platform owners like Apple, Google, and Amazon and major manufacturers such as Samsung and LG to smaller accessory-focused players like Nanoleaf, Eve, and Wyze, there’s an unprecedented industry coalition behind Matter. Which is why it’s probably going to work.

Matter isn’t a new protocol; it’s a specification for how devices should talk to each other. It runs over existing protocols: Thread for low-power, low-bandwidth devices such as light bulbs and sensors and Wi-Fi or ethernet for higher bandwidth devices like streaming media players and cameras (when they arrive).

A key feature of the specification is that all devices can run locally in your home; they do not require an internet connection to work or to work together, although cloud connectivity is an option and allows for out-of-the-home control and integration with cloud services.

Read all about Matter and why it matters in the link above. It has most of your answers.
 

vtqhtr413

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The Verge reports "undeniable momentum" for Matter, the royalty-free interoperability standard that "allows smart home devices from any manufacturer to talk to other devices directly and locally with no need to use the cloud." "Matter was the buzzword throughout CES 2023 this year, with most companies even remotely connected to the smart home loudly discussing their Matter plans. The new smart home standard was featured in several keynotes and displayed prominently in smart home device makers' booths as well as in Google, Amazon, and Samsung's big, showy displays. More importantly, dozens of companies and manufacturers announced specific plans. Several companies said they would update entire product lines, while others announced new ones, sometimes with actual dates and prices. And Matter controllers have become a major thing, with at least four brand-new ones debuting at CES. Interestingly, nearly all of them have a dual or triple function, helping banish the specter of seemingly pointless white hubs stuck in your router closet.
 
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At the time, Signify said a software update that would bring compatibility to its Philips Hue lineup would be available to all users in the first quarter of 2023, which comes to a close this Friday.

But responding to a request by hueblog.com on Monday for more information, the company offered the following update:

For the launch of Matter, we are working together with many partners in the smart home industry. With Philips Hue, we always focus on convincing quality to meet our customers' expectations. Therefore, we will take a little more time than originally planned for the Philips Hue Bridge software update before making it available to all consumers. We will inform you as soon as we have a concrete date for the release of the Matter software update.
 

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Update: Great news! We're rolling out Matter compatibility for our newest Nest Thermostat released in 2020. This means you can now adjust the temp and change your thermostat's mode with multiple Matter-certified smart home platforms and apps.

If your Nest Thermostat hasn't received this update just yet, don't worry --- Matter compatibility will be rolling out to Nest Thermostat over the next few weeks, starting April 18.
 
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:) I am planning to stay old school as long as possible, I don't have a smart energy/water/gas meter. Our overal usage electric/water/gas averages out more than 10 percent below houses with comparable surface/configuration/number of inhabitants (our neigbours in our street, because we live in an neigbourhoud which was innovative and experimental, just before the millennium transition, and super economic (and build with reuse and cyclic economy in mind).

I don't have a smart heating system and I put all my smart devices in the guest network of my 2.4 Ghz Wifi band. I don't want my smart devices to interact ever with each other. I keep them partioned and contained as much as possible,

I have floor heating and a simple temperature sensor (on the water return pipe) with a direct interceptor to the central heating system (which overrules the temperature measured in the living room when nessecary). Simple thermostat knobs on every radiator in every sleeping room and bathroom allow me to adjust temperatures in each sleeping room. So I got all the benefits of personalized heating without the hassle of IOT security and device integration. The structure of the house (facing south) automatically switches of heating using these analog devices (except on maybe 10 days of the coldest days of Dutch winters).

I am planning to buy second hand car batteries to store the solar energy and upgrade our solar panels (because they are nearly 25 years old, but still delivering 90% of their nominal power) I can double the capabity with half the number of solar panels. So I am not against innovation an modern technology, I just don't trust firmware of smart devices

My dumb setup with old school analog sensors beats the smart systems of our neigbours well over 10 percent, so I keep resisting as long as possible to smart stuff
 
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Matter 1.2 released​

Matter Blog: Matter 1.2 Arrives with Nine New Device Types & Improvements Across the Board

Yes, this means you should finally be able to control a robot vacuum in the Apple Home app — not to mention your wine fridge, dishwasher, and washing machine.

The initial feature set for the new device types includes basic function controls (start / stop, change mode) and notifications — such as the temperature of your fridge, the status of your laundry, or whether smoke is detected (see sidebar for more).

Robot vacuum support is robust — remote start and progress notifications, cleaning modes (dry vacuum, wet mopping), and alerts for brush status, error reporting, and charging status. But there’s no mapping, so you’ll still need to use your vacuum app if you want to tell the robot where to go.
Air purifiers and air quality sensors are also interesting additions. Currently, support across platforms for air purifiers is spotty, and products are expensive. Matter supports a wide range of air quality sensors (see sidebar) plus location for sensors, so individual sensors placed around a home can feed data to a device like an air purifier, HVAC system, or a connected oven hood.
Story via Matter 1.2 is a big move for the smart home standard
 

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