Troubleshoot Power outage - Rtx 3090 - question.

sew333

Level 2
Mar 11, 2016
80
List of current issues
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Steps taken, but have been unsuccessful?
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Hello. First my pc:
PC:
Monitor:AORUS FI27Q
Cpu: 10850K with Nzxt Kraken X73 ( 60c in game )
Gpu: Rtx 3090 Gigabyte Gaming Oc ( 62C in game )
Ram: 32gb 2x16 GB DDR4 GSKILL 3200MHZ XMP
Psu: Seasonic Ultra Prime Titanium 850W TX
mb: Aorus 490 Pro Gaming
SSD: Crucial 1TB Nvm SSD
Case: Cooler Master Cosmos C700P

Hello dear users. I dont wanna trolling or something. Please dont think that. I wanna just ask.
So yesterday i was playin Metro Exodus and i get power outage in my house/block. After 10 minutes power back. My question did something happen to pc or if its working again its fine?
Just scary pc was expensive. Thx
 

HarborFront

Level 58
Verified
Content Creator
Oct 9, 2016
4,784
Wow. You really got something here. You can play 8K@60Hz games on a 8K TV

Can post some pictures?

If your MCB (main circuit breaker) trips then it should protect your PC. Also, your PSU has many protections built-in but looks like no surge protection from its website



It would be best to have a UPS with line conditioning and surge protector rolled into one for expensive devices. Read below


 
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Digerati

Level 7
Verified
Mar 2, 2017
325
"Outages" don't harm electronics or a PC (though they can corrupt the data on drives). It is when the power is "restored" that damage to electronics may occur as it is not uncommon for it to come back with a large, or a series of large surges. If those surges are not sufficiently suppressed, they can damage, or at least increase aging in the device.

Note it is because power that is restored after a power outage often comes back in an unstable state for a few seconds, it is always best to wait a couple minutes after the lights come back on before powering up your sensitive and expensive electronics - just to allow the power grid to stabilize. Remember, if an entire neighborhood, for example, loses power, when it is restored, every single refrigerator, air conditioner unit and many other high-wattage devices in the neighborhood is going to power up at the same time. That instantly puts a HUGE instantaneous load on the grid which may result in an unstable grid for a few seconds.

For the record and FYI - in power supplies with built in surge protection, note that typically is a feature designed to protect the connected components from surges on the output side of the PSU - not the PSU from surges coming "in" from the grid.

It would be best to have a UPS
I agree 100% with HarborFront. IMO, every computer should be supported by a "good" UPS with AVR (automatic voltage regulation) - regardless the quality, age, or stability of your grid power. Note it is the AVR that is the primary feature of a good UPS. Backup power during a full outage is just a minor, bonus feature. A decent UPS with AVR will also protect your monitor and all your network gear too.

We need to remember that destructive surges and spikes don't always originate off the grid. A faulty or damaged high-wattage appliance in the home can inject surges on the circuit too. A cheap, $15, 1500W hair dryer made in some obscure factory in the backwoods of China, using parts from a similar factory upriver, comes to mind.

If a good UPS with AVR is not in the budget now, at least get a good surge and spike protect even though they are little more than fancy and expensive extension cords. This is because they do nothing for low voltage events like dips (opposite of spikes), sags (opposite of surges) or brownouts (long duration sags). And for excessive surges and spikes, they simply cut power (IF working properly), crashing your computer - never good. But note if the surge and spike protector is worn out (it is recommended surge and spike protectors be replaced every 2 years) or damaged, they typically provide little to no protection at all. :(

As for your specific question, if your computer is working fine now, it most likely has suffered no permanent damage. If not powered through a good UPS, or at least a good surge and spike protection, I would urge you to do that as soon as possible.

Last, because sudden losses in power can result in data corruption, use this event as another reminder to have current backups of any data you don't want to lose. And note a robust backup plan involves multiple backup copies with at least one maintained "off-site".
 
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Opc9

Level 6
Aug 2, 2020
264
Meh, just fear mongering to be honest. If it started up again everything's fine. PC hardware is smart enough to bounce back after a sudden power failure, just don't make it a habit ;)
Yes, also Seasonic make arguably one of the best high end PSU's in the world with one of the best in-class inrush current protection around. Even with this
it will be unwise to not run a UPS especially if frequent power failures are common.
 
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HarborFront

Level 58
Verified
Content Creator
Oct 9, 2016
4,784
"Outages" don't harm electronics or a PC (though they can corrupt the data on drives). It is when the power is "restored" that damage to electronics may occur as it is not uncommon for it to come back with a large, or a series of large surges. If those surges are not sufficiently suppressed, they can damage, or at least increase aging in the device.

Note it is because power that is restored after a power outage often comes back in an unstable state for a few seconds, it is always best to wait a couple minutes after the lights come back on before powering up your sensitive and expensive electronics - just to allow the power grid to stabilize. Remember, if an entire neighborhood, for example, loses power, when it is restored, every single refrigerator, air conditioner unit and many other high-wattage devices in the neighborhood is going to power up at the same time. That instantly puts a HUGE instantaneous load on the grid which may result in an unstable grid for a few seconds.

For the record and FYI - in power supplies with built in surge protection, note that typically is a feature designed to protect the connected components from surges on the output side of the PSU - not the PSU from surges coming "in" from the grid.


I agree 100% with HarborFront. IMO, every computer should be supported by a "good" UPS with AVR (automatic voltage regulation) - regardless the quality, age, or stability of your grid power. Note it is the AVR that is the primary feature of a good UPS. Backup power during a full outage is just a minor, bonus feature. A decent UPS with AVR will also protect your monitor and all your network gear too.

We need to remember that destructive surges and spikes don't always originate off the grid. A faulty or damaged high-wattage appliance in the home can inject surges on the circuit too. A cheap, $15, 1500W hair dryer made in some obscure factory in the backwoods of China, using parts from a similar factory upriver, comes to mind.

If a good UPS with AVR is not in the budget now, at least get a good surge and spike protect even though they are little more than fancy and expensive extension cords. This is because they do nothing for low voltage events like dips (opposite of spikes), sags (opposite of surges) or brownouts (long duration sags). And for excessive surges and spikes, they simply cut power (IF working properly), crashing your computer - never good. But note if the surge and spike protector is worn out (it is recommended surge and spike protectors be replaced every 2 years) or damaged, they typically provide little to no protection at all. :(

As for your specific question, if your computer is working fine now, it most likely has suffered no permanent damage. If not powered through a good UPS, or at least a good surge and spike protection, I would urge you to do that as soon as possible.

Last, because sudden losses in power can result in data corruption, use this event as another reminder to have current backups of any data you don't want to lose. And note a robust backup plan involves multiple backup copies with at least one maintained "off-site".
Yup, a UPS cw an AVR is great. I missed that. So when buying a UPS should look for below built-in features like

AVR
Power (Line) Conditioning
Surge Protection
 
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