Samsung and Intel's partnership reveals why it's so hard for AMD to break through

Gandalf_The_Grey

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While AMD processors are on the rise, the company still struggles to get its chip in laptops. It's not a conspiracy; it's just Intel does much more to help OEMs.
Earlier this week, Samsung announced some stunning new Windows laptops. The company has made some excellent PCs in the past, but with its first-ever Galaxy Unpacked event dedicated to Windows, it is evident the South Korean company is raising the stakes this time.
But it was on stage, and behind the scenes, that is the real story. Many AMD fans often wonder why PC makers ignore the Intel competitor for new laptops, as for some, AMD is the preferred choice.
The reason is, as always, about money. But it is also about Intel (and Microsoft) working more closely with laptop makers so consumers get better devices. And it's working.

Intel co-engineers (and gives support)
Intel is not a dumb company, even if its processor strategy has slid in the past few years. It using leverage to gain preference with PC makers is not unfair. It is good business.

But Intel doesn't just lean on capital. A few years ago, it began its "Project Athena" program as a multi-year journey to push the laptop segment forward. That later evolved into a more formalized (and marketable) Intel Evo certification. For a company to earn the Evo sticker, a laptop needs to meet specific criteria, including:
  • Consistent responsiveness on battery.
  • Wake from sleep in less than 1 second.
  • 9 or more hours of real-world battery life on laptops with a Full HD display.
  • 4 or more hours of battery life in a 30-minute charge on laptops with Full HD display.
  • Thunderbolt 4 and Wi-Fi 6.
  • Touchscreen.
It's a tremendous joint program between OEMs and Intel as it ensures a certain level of performance and features when people buy a laptop. It is also a response to Apple's tight marriage of hardware and software, which a company like HP or Dell would struggle with since they only build the laptop, they do not design the OS or the chipsets.

Microsoft is in on the action too. I remember hearing some OEMs laughing about Microsoft's Intel' Skylake' debacle from 2015. Finally, they noted, Microsoft knows what it is like to make a Windows laptop. Microsoft learned from that mistake and now works closely with Intel and OEMs to optimize laptop design and software. While things aren't perfect, they are much better, and we haven't had a repeat of 'Skylake.'

All of this is evident this week with Samsung. Intel was literally a part of the show with "co-engineered" emblazoned next to the Intel Evo logo. They're not kidding, either. The new Galaxy Book Pro and Book Pro x360 have unique features like tuned Bluetooth to work better with Galaxy accessories and phones. And, for the first time, the Core i7-1165G7 in these Samsung laptops have an optional fanless mode. Indeed, performance will be limited when that feature is enabled, but it is a fascinating advancement for those who do not like whirring fans while doing lighter work.

Intel's engineering goes even further. They work with Sensel, who is now making haptic trackpads. And the whole dual-screen PC initiative, which Microsoft endorses, is driven by Intel who created reference devices for OEMs to emulate. Remember 'Tiger Rapids'?

And that ground-breaking Lenovo Yoga Book C930? It is also an Intel reference device that Lenovo brought to market with its own twist (this also explains why it doesn't run an ARM processor, by the way).

Intel is also behind Thunderbolt (in collaboration with Apple) and is the largest producer of Wi-Fi 6 mobile cards displacing Marvel (thankfully). The company is also leading the charge on the fascinating new security tech of humand presence detection in laptops.

Say what you want about Intel, but the company is behind many of the recent innovations in PCs.
 

Digerati

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It's not a conspiracy; it's just Intel does much more to help OEMs.
I am glad to see this comment and believe it to be totally true. Smart business decisions does NOT imply anything malicious, evil, or "big brother" is going on. It just means smart business decisions are happening.

Full disclosure: I've been buying $50 worth of Intel every month since Nov 95. So I certainly have a financial incentive for Intel to do good. But I also have some AMD tied up in mutual funds, but nothing close to Intel.

So my point is, I definitely want Intel to keep doing better and better. But I want AMD to succeed too. Intel must NOT become a monopoly. On the contrary, we (all consumers) need AMD to succeed and keep nipping at the heels of Intel. This forces Intel to keep looking over their shoulders, keep innovating, keep moving forward. AMD would love to leapfrog over and spank Intel again. And the last thing Intel wants is to be spanked and humiliated by AMD again.

The last time that happened was when Intel sat on their laurels, basking in their own arrogance as AMD leaped past. It took Intel over 10 years to leapfrog back over with the Core 2 Duo. Overall, Intel is still ahead. But there certainly are some areas where AMD has inched past.

All that competition is good for both companies and most certainly is good for us consumers.

Samsung and Intel joining forces is certainly a good thing. I don't know what the best answer or solution is for AMD. I just hope they make good business decisions too. We need both companies to remain relevant, innovating, and competitive.
 

The_King

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Aug 2, 2020
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I am sure the vast history of unfair business practices between Intel and its OEMS partners has nothing to do with it an even today Intel is "playing by the rules"
after the getting their behinds handed to them by AMD in the consumer and server segments.

I have seen companies like Lenovo remove AMD laptops from their websites because they were outselling Intel Laptops.

 

Digerati

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I have seen companies like Lenovo remove AMD laptops from their websites because they were outselling Intel Laptops.
What? Please clarify. I don't think that's what you meant to say. Why would any company remove a big segment of their products if they were selling like hotcakes?
 

The_King

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Aug 2, 2020
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What? Please clarify. I don't think that's what you meant to say. Why would any company remove a big segment of their products if they were selling like hotcakes?
Exactly, That is a question you should ask yourself. Limited availability of one of your best performing laptops that almost no one can buy?
How does that make any sense to you?
 
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Digerati

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Exactly, That is a question you should ask yourself.
Nah! Why? Because I don't care! This thread is about Samsung and Intel working together.

I'm not sure the point of your posts. It seems you joined this thread just to bash Intel. :( Not the point of this thread. And nothing in your links suggest Lenovo pulled the AMDs "because they were outselling Intels". But it doesn't matter. That's not what this thread is about. This thread is about Intel and Samsung joining forces.
 

The_King

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Aug 2, 2020
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Intentionally selling a version with less performance for more money... but why? Surely more customers would buy the better laptop for cheaper and then more money for Lenovo? Couldn't it just be that AMD supply ran out?
The video clearly says AMD started shipping its 4800U in mass quantities when Lenovo removed it from there lineup.
 

The_King

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Aug 2, 2020
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nvm. (y)

Edited.
FYi The title of his thread is "Samsung and Intel's partnership reveals why it's so hard for AMD to break through"
I believe my posts are relevant to this topic.

You can also change "outselling intel" to "outperforming intel" whichever you prefer both are correct.
 
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Digerati

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My point is,
You can also change "outselling intel" to "outperforming intel" whichever you prefer both are correct.
You can change it to whatever you want. Until Lenovo officially discloses their reasons, you are just speculating.

Also, cherry picking one model from one maker does not suggest the same thing is happening around the globe and across the entire industry with all makers and all models.

And lets not forget this Intel/Samsung partnership is nothing new. They partnered up years ago to co-engineer and manufacture chips for all sorts of things - to include a multitude of IoT devices, PCs and laptops.
 

The_King

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Aug 2, 2020
319
My point is, You can change it to whatever you want. Until Lenovo officially discloses their reasons, you are just speculating.

Also, cherry picking one model from one maker does not suggest the same thing is happening around the globe and across the entire industry with all makers and all models.

And lets not forget this Intel/Samsung partnership is nothing new. They partnered up years ago to co-engineer and manufacture chips for all sorts of things - to include a multitude of IoT devices, PCs and laptops.
Everyone knows the reason. No one will buy an Intel Laptop the performs worst and costs more. I Guess you missed the article related to Dell or
the Long History of Intels anticompetitive lawsuits worth billions of dollars which they have been found guilty of this exact type of behaviour in the past.

Samsung is big the in phone industry but almost irrelevant in the laptop industry.

 
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