Rijndael

Level 1
Firefox doesn't sell data to third parties and telemetries are essential for any products. Besides users can completely turn off everything.
jejeje check this:
When Cliqz is enabled:

  • Firefox shares the following data with Cliqz to provide functionality and improve performance of the Cliqz feature for everyone:
    • Search queries & webpage data: This includes text as you type in the address bar, queries you send to certain search engines, and data about the webpages you visit and interactions with those pages, such as mouse movements, scrolls, and time spent.
    • Interaction data: This includes your interactions with specific fields and buttons in the Cliqz feature. This data is tied to a unique identifier allowing Cliqz to understand performance over time.
  • Firefox shares the following data with Mozilla to better understand interactions between Firefox and the Cliqz feature:
    • Interaction Data: This includes counts of visits to search engine pages, which search engines you use, and a Cliqz identifier.
Only German users affected.
 

SeriousHoax

Level 13
Verified
Malware Tester

Arequire

Level 23
Verified
Content Creator
It wasn't enabled automatically.
It was enabled automatically, as described in Mozilla's press release:
Less than one percent of users in Germany installing Firefox from our main download page will receive a version of Firefox with Cliqz recommendations enabled out of the box.
... if users want to turn it off, they can always disable data collection or remove the Cliqz add-on entirely.
 

Rijndael

Level 1
This is actually old news and Mozilla were heavily criticized for it. But it was a part of Firefox's study features for German users and totally opt in. It wasn't enabled automatically.
For my part I do not criticize Mozilla, they has to earn money to stay in the game, and it is difficult to earn money being a Non-Profit Organization whose main business is an Open Source project without an effective business model.
On the other hand, Cliqz seems like a company committed to privacy.
By the way, Cliqz was enabled by default:
Users who receive a version of Firefox with Cliqz will have their browsing activity sent to Cliqz servers, including the URLs of pages they visit.
We hope that users will appreciate the improved experience, but if users want to turn it off, they can always disable data collection or remove the Cliqz add-on entirely.
 
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SeriousHoax

Level 13
Verified
Malware Tester
It was enabled automatically, as described in Mozilla's press release:
Didn't know that. It was a terrible idea of course. Glad that it was enabled automatically for extremely few users. First of all only in Germany, secondly only on new downloads and only for less than one percent German users. If the number was higher and it was a global case then Firefox would lose a lot of the loyal users. As far as I remember, Firefox is the number 1 PC browser in Germany. More popular than Chrome which is surprising but anyway that was a wrong move for Mozilla which cost them.
 

Umbra

Level 14
Verified
Basically, It was a test to see how people reacted. Classic manoeuver, like all giant do. Guess I didn't have to wait so long...
Google dumped Mozilla, so like a spoiled ex-girlfriend, Mozilla had to make money somehow...
 
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blackice

Level 13
Verified
I actually am trailing edge chromium and AB testing it next to Firefox. But, I use Chrome when I use gmail and other google services, and sometimes just use Chrome. Some days after reading the privacy Reddit and other forums I just want to go back to Chrome exclusively to spite them.
 

Umbra

Level 14
Verified
What are you talking about? Google-Mozilla still has the deal. There isn't any news whether they would renew the deal or not.
Yes my bad, I mistaken with the dump of yahoo. Anyway doesn't change my point of view that datas collection is everywhere.
For your good or not.
 

blackice

Level 13
Verified
Everyone would sell data for money. You would too :=)
Instead most users sell data for free software/services, and then complain that they have to give any data for something that is free. If we still paid for software data mining may not have gotten quite so bad (or maybe it would have anyway :devil: ).
 
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Second thought: despite the many likes and two applauds on my first post in this thread, I think I have to revise my ideas on this

Remember I gave my gaming laptop to my youngest brother an revived a nearly 10 year old laptop with Manjaro Linux, to male October ny stoptober for gaming. It took my brother less than three weeks to click on a "you are infected scam" and download a ransomware to cure his pc from the infection.

Luckily he only uses it for school and gaming (he is 16), so it did not hurt that much to re-install Windows 10 Home again (now as admin with Hard_Configurator SRP and WD defender on highest with protected folders feature on). But when I re-installed, he only was concerned about protection, not privacy (so I manually added some ABP-rules in uBlock to block third-party and pop-ups for his favorite porn websites :cool: )

So me revised opinion

The majority of consumers don't care about privacy. The educated users concerned over privacy already use alternative browsers with extensions to enhance privacy, so when uBlock gets blocked eventually, the world will keep turning and only on forums like MalwareTips people will be talking about it. But we are less than a fraction of the world population using smartphones, tablets and PC's, so to quote a famous movie (Gone with the wind) "Frankly my dear, I don't give a damn".
 
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Umbra

Level 14
Verified
So me revised opinion

The majority of consumers don't care about privacy. The educated users concerned over privacy already use alternative browsers with extensions to enhance privacy, so when uBlock gets blocked eventually, the world will keep turning and only on forums like MalwareTips people will be talking about it. But we are less than a fraction of the world population using smartphones, tablets and PC's, so to quote a famous movie (Gone with the wind) "Frankly my dear, I don't give a damn".
you finally got it :)
 
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Gandalf_The_Grey

Level 22
Verified
Google Begins Testing Extension Manifest V3 in Chrome Canary:

Google has begun testing their upcoming extension manifest V3 in the the latest Chrome Canary build, and with this initial 'alpha' release, developers can begin testing their extensions under the upcoming specification.

In a post to the Chromium Extensions Google group, Simeon Vincent, a Google Developer Advocate for Chrome Extensions, stated that as of October 31st a developer preview of the extension manifest v3 is now available in the Chrome 80 Canary build.

 

Cortex

Level 12
I've fully moved to AdGuard desk & have lifetime licence so what Google or Chromium/FF do in their infinite wisdom & or what their (real) reasons are for me are irrelevant, few issues are but a slowdown using a VPN which I now use rarely so issue solved for me.