Spawn

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Homepage: iPhone SE
The iPhone SE is essentially an iPhone 8 with a better camera and processor — and a lower price tag. Although it’s a relatively old design, this iPhone SE has Apple’s A13 Bionic chip, the same that’s available in the latest iPhone 11 and 11 Pro models.

What You Get
  • Screen: 4.7-inch True Tone display
  • Rear cameras: 12-megapixel single 6-element lens, features OIS, flicker sensor for white balance, focus pixels, HDR, and portrait mode for people, video recording at 4K/60fps
  • Selfie camera: 7-megapixel camera
  • Dimensions: 67.3 x 138.4 x 7.3mm, 148 grams
  • Processor: A13 Bionic
  • Memory: TBD
  • Storage: 64GB, 128GB, and 256GB
  • Battery: TBD
  • OS: iOS 13
  • Connectivity: Wi-Fi 6, Gigabit LTE, Dual SIM with eSIM
  • Biometric authentication: second-generation Touch ID fingerprint sensor
  • Wireless charging, Lightning connector, 5W charger included
  • IP67 protection
Source: Apple announces the new $399 iPhone SE for 2020
 

Protomartyr

Level 6
Verified
I would have considered this if they had minimized the bezels to allow for a bigger screen while maintaining the same body size of the iPhone 8. A 4.7" screen is a little too small for my liking.

Even though this is not for me, I'm glad Apple now has different price points in their product lineup that anyone can enjoy.
 

upnorth

Moderator
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Staff member
Malware Hunter
399 for a brand new iPhone ( entry level version ), that alone is pretty amazing and if one don't mind some lack in specs ( camera, battery, size etc ), this could easy become a nice first iPhone. Personal I would probably spend those 399 on a Nokia instead.
 

CyberTech

Level 32
Verified
The new iPhone SE will appeal to many iPhone 6 owners, predict analysts – except in China, where a huge survey on the social network Weibo showed limited interest.

For most iPhone 6 owners, suggested Gartner, the timing is perfect …

Reuters reports.
The new Apple device will offer owners of the ageing iPhone 6 an affordable way to get onto the latest and most secure version of Apple’s iOS smartphone operating system, one industry analyst said.
“These are people who keep their phones for four or five years, until they either break or the battery dies,” said Annette Zimmermann at consultancy Gartner.
 

Spawn

Administrator
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Meh the battery 1821 mAh? its not good ;/
It's the same size as the iPhone 8 battery, since it's the same shell dimensions.

iOS is very well optimised so battery life with the latest A13 chip, it should not be an issue. Most people charge their phones daily, even if it's just a quick 20%.

Edit: This video has valid points about the SE.

 
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CyberTech

Level 32
Verified
It's the same size as the iPhone 8 battery, since it's the same shell dimensions.

iOS is very well optimised so battery life with the latest A13 chip, it should not be an issue. Most people charge their phones daily, even if it's just a quick 20%.
Yea i know at least like 2000 mAh is good because its 2020, i really like the SE some ppl who check social media/text as simple...
 

Spawn

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scorpionv

Level 2
Btw, how much will it cost in Europe? 600 euros?
Netherlands:
  • iPhone SE (64 GB): € 489
  • iPhone SE (128 GB): € 539
  • iPhone SE (256 GB): € 659

Just in the price range of the mid level Androids. Only just, if you consider the average user wants more than 64GB. But then again, Apple is not trying to compete with the price fighters, they want to get people into their eco-system. From what I see around me, once you move over to the Apple side, you are likely to stay there.
 

roger_m

Level 30
Verified
Content Creator
Paying 1000 Euros for any flagship Android phone that is going to get at-most 4 years of updates is a financially dismal decision.
I think the price is much more of an issue than the limited updates. While it's good to get updates, I think Android users upgrade because they want a new phone, rather than due to the lack of updates.

I know that I would never buy a new phone, just because there were no further updates being released for my current phone.
 
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F 4 E

Level 2
In Australia, the SE starts at AU$749 for the 64 GB model. Not cheap, then.

Like all Apple products in Australia, it's expensive for what you get.

AFAIK, it doesn't even have a full HD display, although the processor is the A13 so it will be quick.

I'll stick to Samsungs and Nokias, thanks. Much better value.
 

yuanyasmine

Level 1
Pre-ordered one, and had it delivered to my friend's house as I wasn't home during the delivery window. Still haven't had the chance to pick it up from him.

I'm one of the holdouts clutching to TouchID, so this should work out for me. It's not what I truly want, which is a full-screen device with TouchID ability, but it's the closest I can get. A13+gigabit LTE+WiFi 6 are big selling points.

Looking forward to its improvements over the 7, and to the $120 once that 7's trade-in processes.
 

roger_m

Level 30
Verified
Content Creator
Security is notoriously bad on phones as it is. Not having regular updates just compounds the problem.
I've been using Android devices for over 9 years, mostly running outdated versions of Android. A lot of the apps I've installed have come from outside of the Play Store. Despite this, I've never been infected.

I can upgrade my phone to the current version of Android, with custom firmware. However, since I never get infected, I won't be doing that just yet. A friend of mine has a Note 2, which is still running Android 4.4.2 and has also never got infected.
 

ebocious

Level 4
I've been using Android devices for over 9 years, mostly running outdated versions of Android. A lot of the apps I've installed have come from outside of the Play Store. Despite this, I've never been infected.

I can upgrade my phone to the current version of Android, with custom firmware. However, since I never get infected, I won't be doing that just yet. A friend of mine has a Note 2, which is still running Android 4.4.2 and has also never got infected.
Famous last words.
 

roger_m

Level 30
Verified
Content Creator
The "I've never been infected" argument always fails when the person making that argument does get infected.
My years of experience indicates that, despite malware being a problem for Android devices, it is actually quite hard to get infected. My extensive usage proves to me without any doubt, that if it was easy to get infected, I would have by now.

Will I get infected someday? It's certainly possible. It's also possible that I never will. However, I base security decisions on my experience, rather than "what if" scenarios. It's no different to how I approach PC security.
Famous last words.
Well, as I've just explained, I stand by my decisions.
 

ebocious

Level 4
My years of experience indicates that, despite malware being a problem for Android devices, it is actually quite hard to get infected. My extensive usage proves to me without any doubt, that if it was easy to get infected, I would have by now.

Will I get infected someday? It's certainly possible. It's also possible that I never will. However, I base security decisions on my experience, rather than "what if" scenarios. It's no different to how I approach PC security.
Do you know how many supposedly clean computers I've disinfected? Now, I don't mess with Androids much these days, but there are more infected Androids than Windows PCs. And bad/compromised apps notwithstanding, do you know what many of these Androids have in common? Outdated OS versions.

So, you are reactive, rather than proactive. You wait until after you get in trouble to beef up security. Out of curiosity, do you drive uninsured?

Well, as I've just explained, I stand by my decisions.
Good for you. So, if there's nothing dangerous out there, then what are you doing here at Malwaretips? Here, we discuss best practices to stay protected from "what if" scenarios. Do you have something to contribute, or are you just here to tell everyone to lower their defenses?
 
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