Which product would you choose?

  • VoodooShield

    Votes: 21 52.5%
  • SecureAPlus

    Votes: 5 12.5%
  • Comodo Firewall

    Votes: 11 27.5%
  • NVT EXE Radar pro

    Votes: 3 7.5%
  • Total voters
    40

TheMalwareMaster

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when you install a program, you are supposed to put VS into disable/install mode.
otherwise, an inexperienced user would have it in autopilot.
after installation, a few minutes later the user will get a prompt to turn the protection back on.
But.. An inexperienced user is usually unable to recognise If the software which is installing is secure (that's why we are using VS). So, If he disabled the product and the software was adware or malicious, it will be installed successfully. If VS was on autopilot, the program will be blocked on execution. And I can simply teach to the user that he should click allow If he receives a command line alert (in this case the software was safe)
 
D

Deleted member 2913

But.. An inexperienced user is usually unable to recognise If the software which is installing is secure (that's why we are using VS). So, If he disabled the product and the software was adware or malicious, it will be installed successfully. If VS was on autopilot, the program will be blocked on execution, and I can simply teach to the user that he should click allow If he receives a command line alert
Command line alert could be probs for inexperienced users as default is always block. Previous versions had command line options & you could disable those but the option was removed. But command line options are going to return as per Dev.

My idea of VS for inexperience users is -
List of AVs in the GUI so that you can select/unselect AVs for Blacklist Scan detection. This will help minimize FPs as 56 AVs means FPs chances increases.
VAi sensitivity level - It depends, you can keep default @100 or test & select the sensitivity level you find good for the use.
Command line - When options return back, I will disable command line.

I will install VS on my family shared system of Average users But when the above mentioned things will be present.
 

shmu26

Level 85
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But.. An inexperienced user is usually unable to recognise If the software which is installing is secure (that's why we are using VS). So, If he disabled the product and the software was adware or malicious, it will be installed successfully. If VS was on autopilot, the program will be blocked on execution. And I can simply teach to the user that he should click allow If he receives a command line alert (in this case the software was safe)
the user knows when he is trying to install new software, or update existing software.
So if VS autopilot gives him the green light, then yes, you can safely tell him to click through whatever pop-ups may occur during the installation process.
I am guessing that this might result in the installation of side programs that were bundled with the main program, but that will happen anyway to the inexperienced user.
 

jamescv7

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SecureAplus is more on such fine-tune and not in such heavy from detection.

But Voodoshield has expand on the technologies to provide in order to have strong mechanism of anti-exe base.

Of course Comodo Firewall, a classic program but already strong on their capabilities; it's a matter of tweak preferences.
 
D

Deleted member 178

I discovered that NVT EXE Radar Pro has a Free version.
the Beta is free at the moment, the stable will be paid (if a stable is ever released...)

How Is it compared to VoodooShield, considering protection and system impact? Is it Good to be used by inexperienced users? (does the product have lots of alerts in which you have to choose
For me, ERP was the best anti-exe ever made alongside Appguard, you have full control of everything , it is user-friendly , light on resources, almost bugless. The problem now is the development is paused. Now new players have come and ERP is loosing ground.
 

shmu26

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I will probably test it in the future.. I believe that, since only the beta is free, it is better using VS
the beta behaves like a stable version. that is not really the problem.
although it is not being actively developed right now, you can manually add to the list of vulnerable processes, and otherwise tweak it to keep yourself up to date.

however, VS is more suited for the average user

EDIT: many of the advanced users have left NVT and gone over to ReHIPS, which is also a beta program, and is not even open to the general public, unless you ask the dev to let you join.
 
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King Alpha

Level 25
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VS - Light, User-Friendly
NVTERP - Light, A combination of Advanced/User-Friendly

For me, ERP was the best anti-exe ever made alongside Appguard, you have full control of everything , it is user-friendly , light on resources, almost bugless. The problem now is the development is paused. Now new players have come and ERP is loosing ground.
NVTERP + AppGuard + Sandboxie = Bulletproof :D
One of the security combos I learned from @Umbra. :p
 

TheMalwareMaster

Level 20
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the beta behaves like a stable version. that is not really the problem.
although it is not being actively developed right now, you can manually add to the list of vulnerable processes, and otherwise tweak it to keep yourself up to date.

however, VS is more suited for the average user

EDIT: many of the advanced users have left NVT and gone over to ReHIPS, which is also a beta program, and is not even open to the general public, unless you ask the dev to let you join.
So ,Basically the whitelist is no longer up to date?
 

shmu26

Level 85
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So ,Basically the whitelist is no longer up to date?
not exactly. the whitelist is defined by, and tailored to, your specific system.
but in addition to your personal whitelist, there is another list: vulnerable processes. This is an advanced feature, it keeps an eagle-eye on certain windows processes that are exploitable. So even if a known and trusted exe is trying to run a vulnerable process, you will get a prompt, unless that particular command-line is specifically whitelisted. This feature protects you from malware hijacking a trusted app in order to run windows processes that can do a lot of damage.

This vulnerable processes list is, in the opinion of some, too short. Each user may add to it, according to his own level of expertise and paranoia, or copy someone else's list who is more expert and paranoid.
 

shmu26

Level 85
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basically the point is this: new forms of malware will find new exploit routes. once a certain process starts to be exploited a lot, you might want to add it to your vulnerable processes list. If the dev was on the job, he would be doing that for you.

Umbra might be able to shed more light on this subject.
 
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