Update Winstall.app is a web-based GUI for the Windows Package Manager

CyberTech

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Earlier this week at Build, Microsoft introduced the Windows Package Manager, its first attempt at creating a Linux-like package manager for Windows. In its current form, it's a tool entirely based on the command line, making it possible to quickly download and install a multitude of apps from a centralized repository, which is hosted on GitHub.

If you're not a fan of using command line-based tool, though, Mehedi Hassan, who also develops the popular Tweeten client for Twitter, has created winstall.app. It's a web app that serves as a GUI version of the Windows Package Manager, letting users search for and install apps on an individual basis. It also lets users select multiple apps and create a batch command that installs all of them in one go using the command line.

The repository that the Windows Package Manager - and winstall.app - feed off of has grown significantly in the past couple of days, and already has over 240 apps as of the time of writing. This includes the likes of Steam, ShareX, Telegram, Google Chrome, Edge, and more. Software developers can also submit their app manifests to the repository in order to make them available on the Windows Package Manager.

Currently, the Windows Package Manager is somewhat limited in that it can only search and install apps, but Microsoft discussed some improvements during Build sessions. The company is working on adding uninstall and update commands to make it easier to manage packages you've already installed. If you'd like to get the latest updates to Windows Package Manager, you'll need to be a Windows Insider or sign up for the Windows Package Manager Insider program. The Windows Package Manager is distributed as part of the Windows App Installer that's already included in Windows 10.

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geminis3

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are the apps updated automatically?

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At its virtual Build event last month, Microsoft launched the Windows Package Manager, or winget, a command-line based tool that aims to make it easier to install your favorite apps more quickly. Soon after, developer Mehedi Hassan introduced Winstall.app, a web-based GUI that feeds off of the same GitHub repository as winget, providing a more accessible way to download those apps.

Today, Hassan announced that winstall.app is now out of preview, and with the full launch there are a few new features to look forward to. For one thing, you can now search for apps using a number of different parameters, such as associated tags, publisher, or description.

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CyberTech

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Microsoft released the first stable version of Windows Package Manager, a tool to install and manage programs efficiently on Windows 10 machines.

Many things have changed since our first look at Winget, wish we published in May 2020.

At its core, it is still a package manager that you may know from other operating systems. Windows users may compare it to program installers such as Ninite, Scoop, or just-install, which offer similar functionality but are maintained by third-parties.

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rain2reign

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Gandalf_The_Grey

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Windows 10's package manager flooded with duplicate, malformed apps:
Last week, Microsoft released the first stable version of its Windows 10 package manager, Winget, which enables users to manage apps via command-line.

Much like package managers available on other platforms, Winget lets Windows users automate app management when it comes to installing, configuring, upgrading, and uninstalling applications.

But, over the weekend, multiple users flooded Winget's software registry with pull requests for apps that are either duplicate or malformed, thereby raising concerns about the integrity of the Winget ecosystem.
 

Gandalf_The_Grey

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Microsoft is tightening Windows Package Manager (winget) submission rules:
If you want to be in full control of submissions, you need to review them manually. Microsoft recognized this and decided to switch from automated to manual submissions. That's a good thing, even though it may mean that it may take longer before new submissions or changes find their way into the repository.
 
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