Do you use an adblocker?

  • Yes!

    Votes: 65 95.6%
  • No!

    Votes: 3 4.4%
  • Total voters
    68

DJ Panda

Level 29
Verified
I have had a hard time in the past. I was fairly rude in the past and before we start I'd like to apologize for that. Hopefully, at the end of the day, we can all agree to disagree!

Argument #1 "Ads are annoying" Yes I know even the best of us can get peeved by the same rolling ad on YouTube, Twitch, or other sites. However, nothing is free. A lot of the YouTube channels may do this for money, but yes many pour their heart and soul into making this entertainment for people like you and me. With adblocking, they may even turn into a death spiral. Worse videos ----) More adblocking ----) Cycle continues So if we take their only source of revenue where what will we enjoy? YouTube may eventually charge a fee for the site and I do not wish to pay up.
I recommend looking at Professor Puppet's video on adblocking. (May contains a small bit of adult language.)
Argument #2 Privacy
This one I understand completely. If you want privacy you should have the right to it. However, regardless the way you do it, you will never have full undetectable life on the internet. There are many extensions such as Avaria Safelight, Avast Online Security that can help you with that. Be warned, though I have heard disabling some data collection can cause more harm than good. If you don't mind though on what data is given its even less strain on your browser/computer.

Final Argument Malvertising/Family Protection
This is possibly one of the hardest arguments on the list. I haven't really dealt with Malvertising before. I have suspected once that I was but it may have been a buggy Microsoft Edge. Anyway, this part of adblocking is huge. Adblocking may be good with very young children or very old adults, but there is most likely another way in not getting infected. I for one use an AV. They may not be perfect, (Other products like whitelists or blacklist for sites are good as well.) My AV has been flawlessly protecting me for the past 10 years and I have no regrets. If I were to get attacked this would be the situations. However, before any of this, you should always have a backup of your data. Even if the ads can be bad it would have been the user's fault for not backing up first. These are my situations. A. My AV manages to detect and block the file before activation. B. I get a minor infection and have to clean my computer with some on-demand scanners. C. Get hit by ransomware, I already backed up my data so that is good. If the damage is so bad that I would have to reformat. (Since I had an up to date backup I shouldn't have to worry about that. As well as leaving the computer to do a fresh install isn't that bad.

Hopefully with all this in mind, you can make the decision of dropping your adblocker! If not that is fine too, I don't think less of you, just agree to disagree! Remember let's all try to be respectful with this touchy subject.
Hope you guys loved my +Wave treatment! (Not hating on you :p)

-JGamez (Attempted typing with Gramarly)
 
W

Wave

If you want to be safe than sorry then use an ad-blocker, if you don't care much and are willing to take the risk and want to see advertisements then go for it. There's no issue here, everyone has their own views, you're entitled to share yours :) But from a security standard, it is not good to not use an ad-blocker and that's simply a fact and not an opinion due to the evolving threat of malvertising (it's becoming bigger and bigger and has been developing over the years, now it is becoming more frequent).

Although I doubt anyone is going to exchange their protection to give some services a few cents or be bothered. People can always just get a proper job which will pay properly or make a paid service, ads are not a very reliable method of income for this specific reason.

If advertisements had been used properly and not abused by thousands at the start, and for pushing malicious software (drive-by-downloads, exploit kits, etc.) then there wouldn't be as much need for an ad-blocker IMO. Even when it's not used for malware, you regularly find sites that push on so many ads for each page and also show pop-ups, it's a joke.

This is possibly one of the hardest arguments on the list. I haven't really dealt with Malvertising before. I have suspected once that I was but it may have been a buggy Microsoft Edge. Anyway, this part of adblocking is huge. Adblocking may be good with very young children or very old adults, but there is most likely another way in not getting infected. I for one use an AV. They may not be perfect, (Other products like whitelists or blacklist for sites are good as well.) My AV has been flawlessly protecting me for the past 10 years and I have no regrets. If I were to get attacked this would be the situations. However, before any of this, you should always have a backup of your data. Even if the ads can be bad it would have been the user's fault for not backing up first. These are my situations. A. My AV manages to detect and block the file before activation. B. I get a minor infection and have to clean my computer with some on-demand scanners. C. Get hit by ransomware, I already backed up my data so that is good. If the damage is so bad that I would have to reformat. (Since I had an up to date backup I shouldn't have to worry about that. As well as leaving the computer to do a fresh install isn't that bad.
Having a backup doesn't mean malware cannot do any damage... It could infect the firmware (BIOS) and cause problems, it could steal existent data on the system which can be used by an attacker (e.g. login credentials, etc.). Or the attacker can control your system via a backdoor and do a lot of damage; spread the malware through your e-mail/social networking also, there's limitless opportunities in the infection scenario.
 

sudo -i

Level 4
My options: Disable ad-blocking for a reason that will not directly affect my life positively at all, and run the risk of having it directly affect my life negatively instead. OR. Continue ad-blocking and only disable it for very select websites.

I'm settling for the latter.
 

DJ Panda

Level 29
Verified
@Wave there are many products that can be used without a need of an adblocker. HitmanPro can help with many problems such as exploits, keyloggers, and malware in general. Throw in an AV then you can be pretty good. You can use a standard user account with max UAC. That way even if the file becomes active in does right away get admin privileges or downright denied. With all due respect, if the threat is so huge how come I haven't gotten attacked yet? Even with pretty good protection, I can sometimes get cocky and almost get myself infected at times. (More from going on bad sites, not ads even themselves. :p) With talking about the few cents its not that small anymore. With about 30million downloads combining and counting. Chrome's extensions of Adblock, Ablock Plus, AdGuard, and Ublock the size isn't getting any smaller. One person may seem small but 30mil+ can cause huge dents.

@sudo -i If it is not to personal what do you do on the internet? If you watch any sort of video and AdBlock it. You're not giving them the support to make their hobby of entertainment a reality job. U.S can be a bright place in where you can succeed how you want to. If you don't give them the money they need they will have to pin their well-being over their job on the internet. I'm not saying everyone on the internet should get money. (Cyber criminals shouldn't.) More my small pet peeve is using it on places like YouTube which have become a lot safer.

I really ask the people of the thread to give me a reason besides "annoying" ads please. :)
 
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Spawn

Administrator
Verified
Staff member
Currently trying adaware adblocker, but most of the time I don't have one installed. Playing around with Cookies and JavaScript on Chrome, because I want to see the effects it has on certain websites.

I no longer encourage or discourage the use of an Adblocker. :)
 

sudo -i

Level 4
There is only one bottom line, and it is that not using an ad-blocker is simply bad practise.

There is a whitelist feature for each adblocking extension or software that I've tested. If you want to support certain companies, groups, or individuals, whitelist their domain. Otherwise, there is absolutely no reason to browse the internet waiting for a surprise that you didn't want to begin with. I can't justify supporting anyone and everyone on the internet, it doesn't make sense to me.

For example, there are websites now that use page scrolling as a "refresh" to get their page more hits. What does that mean? It means every time you scroll an increment in any direction, the page silently refreshes and gives the site an extra view. When you check your browsing history, you will see that website registered over 50 times just by scrolling for a few seconds. Why would I voluntarily support methods like this AND allow ads?

I'm happy picking and choosing my whitelist domains and not having to worry about everyone else on the internet being ethical.
 

RVS2

Level 2
Ads are harmless and pay for things so that we don't have to pay.

But that's only applicable to secure sites.

Many sites I used to visit before having a blocker would have annoying pop ups, adware, malicious links etc.

Also I hate tracking and seeing targeted ads.

So finally, ads are fine as long as privacy is upheld. It's not the case always so I use an adblocker.
 

DJ Panda

Level 29
Verified
I dislike adblockers altogether. Its needed in moderation. If you have to use it on shady sites, then do it. I am more mad with the people that can't sit through a couple of YouTube video ads. Its how I get my entertainment. I'll give them money from the ads I watch so they won't move on to a different job.
 

Evjl's Rain

Level 43
Verified
Trusted
Content Creator
Malware Hunter
if you don't want to block ads, you can still use ublock origin, disable all the filters, just add
- tracking filters
- hphosts exploits (emp)
- hphosts malwares (emd)
- adguard spyware
- malwaredomainlist
- disconnect malware
- disconnect malvertising
- ransomware trackers
- ublock filters plus (for better popup blocking)
- ...

similar filters can be found here: FilterLists

also install popup blocker (strict)

I guess those filters won't block ads but at least make you feel more confident while surfing, right?
 

reboot

Level 3
Verified
I dislike adblockers altogether. Its needed in moderation. If you have to use it on shady sites, then do it. I am more mad with the people that can't sit through a couple of YouTube video ads. Its how I get my entertainment. I'll give them money from the ads I watch so they won't move on to a different job.
Do you clear cookies from your machine? If your answer is yes... then like those who use adblockers you also have an impact on their advertising revenue.
 

DJ Panda

Level 29
Verified
Do you clear cookies from your machine? If your answer is yes... then like those who use adblockers you also have an impact on their advertising revenue.
Can you enlighten me on how? I still view ads. I click on ones that interest me. Unlike the adblockers I still give revenue..
 
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5

509322

The argument that adblockers will lead to the demise of free content is fallacious. The online ad revenue model itself is highly flawed; ads only make financial sense if they generate product and service revenue. Plus, the "value" provided by online ads is highly dubious. A lot of ads are nothing, but scams of one sort or another. The online ad revenue model isn't sustainable - it doesn't generate sufficient revenue to cover expenses in the first place for many sites. That's been true from the beginning and eventually fees are going to be levied. It's inevitable.

Let the free market and economic forces do their magic. A lot of the online garbage will simply vaporize. Online has always been seen as some kind of goldrush opportunity, but the reality is something quite different. The truth is, a lot of it has turned out to be a bust.

The ad providers are desperate, the practices are underhanded, pay-per-display advertising kills your browser, they rip-off their own clients, there are no controls or regulations, ad fraud is rampant, etc, etc.

For sites that you know are worthwhile - like TheWindowsClub - you can allow ads on a site-by-site basis. However, when good sites make it such that you cannot access their content using an adblocker, then I say boycott that site to send them a message. Case in point is TheWindowsClub. Go there a few times and eventually you will be denied access with an "Whitelist our ads" overlay. Block that site's 3rd-party content and scripts.

Use an adblocker. First, and foremost, it greatly improves browser performance by eliminating bandwidth over-consumption. Secondly, page owners refuse to take responsibility for malvertising that is linked to their sites via 3rd-party content providers\delivery platforms. Not only does consumer fraud exist, but online advertisers are defrauded regularly as well through various click-fraud campaigns and such.

There are a lot of parties out there that actually, and truly think and believe, that the user has no right whatsoever to block ads. They want adblockers to be illegalized. They don't want you to have any choice.

The online advertising industry did it to itself with its own bad practices. They have nobody to blame but themselves. The unfortunate consequence of those practices is that now many users consider any advertising as an annoyance and security risk - and justifiably so.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

reboot

Level 3
Verified
Can you enlighten me on how? I still view ads. I click on ones that interest me. Unlike the adblockers I still give revenue..
Please do some research on Remarketing.

My second question is... How do you know that the video creator on YouTube that you like is being paid for the advertising? Just because ads are displayed that doesn't necessarily mean that you are supporting him or her by clicking on the ads.

If one clicks on ads just for the sake of supporting people they like knowing that those people DO get paid commissions it could be argued that the person doing the clicking is actually stealing from the advertiser. This could be just a small business person trying to make a living and now having to pay for extra clicks which have no chance of converting into revenue for him/her. Does that make sense?

I highlight all this NOT to make you wrong. You have good intentions and have been brave enough to come out and state them. I just think we all need to be aware that it is not so black and white. There are many contexts that need to considered including many outside of the 'security' context.
 

tim one

Level 21
Verified
Trusted
Malware Hunter
Using an Adblocker is always controversial, because by blocking the advertising means to remove the source of livelihood of many sites.

Ok but the world of online advertising has very big problems, because it is often used to convey attacks that target users of safe sites, and then an adblocker is also a form of protection from these dangers.

Ads in fact, are inserted into the sites using the code provided by the advertising agencies, who receive this code by the advertisers. And among the advertisers, have also introduced the criminals to inject their own attacks in the advertising code. The agencies filter out and check, but the techniques of criminals are very effective and often exceed the controls.

In fact, I remember something about millions of people who visit mainstream sites have been affected by an attack in which the malicious code was hidden in the parameters that govern the transparency of the pixels of some images...
The Javascript code contained in the code of insertion is clean but it downloads an image banner that contains variations invisible pixel that Javascript interprets to extract precisely the malicious code. This system bypass the security filters by infecting users who use also the latest versions of Adobe Flash.

This is only an example, but malversting causes many victims and if I can add another security layer to protect myself, then I go for it, without moral problems.
 
5

509322

Using an Adblocker is always controversial, because by blocking the advertising means to remove the source of livelihood of many sites.
The growing trend is that users don't want online advertising in their browsers or Apps - at least not anything like the form of digital advertising as it exists today. It's a consumer-driven force that will (and should - considering all the advertising garbage online) cause the demise of sites.
 
W

Wave

@Wave there are many products that can be used without a need of an adblocker. HitmanPro can help with many problems such as exploits, keyloggers, and malware in general. Throw in an AV then you can be pretty good. You can use a standard user account with max UAC. That way even if the file becomes active in does right away get admin privileges or downright denied. With all due respect, if the threat is so huge how come I haven't gotten attacked yet? Even with pretty good protection, I can sometimes get cocky and almost get myself infected at times. (More from going on bad sites, not ads even themselves. :p) With talking about the few cents its not that small anymore. With about 30million downloads combining and counting. Chrome's extensions of Adblock, Ablock Plus, AdGuard, and Ublock the size isn't getting any smaller. One person may seem small but 30mil+ can cause huge dents.

@sudo -i If it is not to personal what do you do on the internet? If you watch any sort of video and AdBlock it. You're not giving them the support to make their hobby of entertainment a reality job. U.S can be a bright place in where you can succeed how you want to. If you don't give them the money they need they will have to pin their well-being over their job on the internet. I'm not saying everyone on the internet should get money. (Cyber criminals shouldn't.) More my small pet peeve is using it on places like YouTube which have become a lot safer.

I really ask the people of the thread to give me a reason besides "annoying" ads please. :)
People have given you more reasons but each time you attempt to counter it so it'd pointless brainstorming of any reasons. We get it, you don't like adblockers, but asking people to drop their adblocker is very bad advice.
 

_CyberGhosT_

Level 53
Verified
Trusted
Content Creator
I am a Proud user of AdGuard.
I use it because it is more than just an Ad Blocker, it's an ever present
part of my "Security" Config. In today's threat field or landscape it is a
must. On the paid content side of things, if AdGuard will be the cause
of having to pay to access certain sites, cool. I am for a safer web and I
will never apologize for that, and If a safer web means paying at times I
am willing to do that too.
Cool topic.