Azure

Level 25
Verified
Content Creator
Fun facts Brave vs Cliqz:
- privacy law: US vs DE (EU GDPR is much more strict than US ECPA )
- own browser : Yes (Brave Chromium fork) -vs Yes (Cliqz Firefox fork)
- own advertising and reward model: Yes (Brave rewards are percentage of ad-income) vs Yes (Ghostery Awards are a discount on offerings)
- open source and opt-out: Yes & Yes vs Yes & Yes
- contribute to development of adblock innovation: Yes (link already provided) vs Yes (cliqz-oss/adblocker)
- bottem line: Brave is the undisputed darling of privacy aware forum members vs Cliqz is the cursed devil in disguise by members of this forum

Help me understand the difference :unsure::unsure::unsure::unsure::unsure::unsure::unsure::unsure::unsure::unsure::unsure::unsure::unsure::unsure::unsure::unsure::unsure::unsure::unsure::unsure::unsure::unsure::unsure::unsure::unsure::unsure::unsure:



P.S. I am not using Brave or Cliqz (browser nor its extension Ghostery)
I find the Brave to be nice and willing to help users that have problems. Having read some of their tweets for quite some time, I find them trustworthy which is one point towards me continuing to use Brave.
 

oldschool

Level 49
Verified
I find the Brave to be nice and willing to help users that have problems. Having read some of their tweets for quite some time, I find them trustworthy which is one point towards me continuing to use Brave.
I agree. Brave has a very funtional and pleasing interface in search/toolbar. The forum is OK but has suffered from a flood of posts relative to the the number of support staff who oversee it. Lag time from post to response has increased, with posts somtimes going completely unanswered.
 

Burrito

Level 23
Fun facts Brave vs Cliqz:
- privacy law: US vs DE (EU GDPR is much more strict than US ECPA )

Help me understand the difference :unsure::unsure::unsure::unsure::unsure::unsure::unsure::unsure::unsure::unsure::unsure::unsure::unsure::unsure::unsure::unsure::unsure::unsure::unsure::unsure::unsure::unsure::unsure::unsure::unsure::unsure::unsure:
Just fyi... the state of California in the US is instituting a more rigorous privacy policy --- the CCPA.

Because California is a large part of the market share in the US, I'm going to guess that most companies will choose to comply with the CCPA as opposed to stopping business operations in California.

The CCPA is more like the GDPR -- a larger and more consumer respecting policy.

But this is new -- so it's hard to know where this might end up. Our current national administration does not particularly respect consumer issues --- so they may try to invalidate the CCPA -- just as they have with other initiatives.
 

Lenny_Fox

Level 10
Privacy Badger monitors third-party exposure on domain level (does not look at first-party sub domains). When a third-party domain tracks you while you are visiting three different websites, that domain is blocked. Example when you surf to website A, B and C and on all three websites (domains) a third-party request to domain 666 sends data to that domain, domain 666 is supposed to be an ad&tracking server. Besides domain-level heuristics Privacy Badger also uses a domain level blacklist.

Ghostery monitors the URL-parameters which are used to pass information from website (domain) to another website (domain). Because Ghostery looks ate URL's it can also look at sub domains. A domain can have several sub-domains (e.g. www.websiteABC.com also calls to www.video.CDN.websiteABC.com). When a website links to another website it may pass parameters embedded in the URL, e.g. (Video=holiday,Country=Hawai,Campaign=Diving,Location=yourZipcode). Ghostery looks at the parameter values and when a certain value is passed to the an specific URL more than three times in the last two days, it will be filtered.

In this example you might have been looking to a diving holiday on several exotic locations. When the URL-parameter containing yourZipCode was passed the third-time it would be filtered out, so the ad&tracking server would have one ID less to tag you (making it harder to know that it is probably the same person searching for something). This makes Ghostery's filtering mechanisme much more granular as Privacy Badger's mechanism. Also because Ghostery filters the parameter and does not block the third-party request to the domain, the chance of breaking a website is much lower. Besides this domain-URL-parameter heuristics filtering mechanism, Ghostery also uses a domain-level blacklist.

I think the insight knowledge of Cliqz being a digital marketing company helps (a thief to catch a thief), same probably applies to Brave (offering an alternative to existing advertising models). In June I will have finished my study and I will also be a certified digital marketing professional (consider me an undercover agent, spying on behalf MT-forum :) ).
 
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monkeylove

Level 4
I tried one of the streamlined lists mentioned in this forum, then Ghostery and others, and several ads, popups, and other annoyances showed up in some sites I visited. Given that, I went back to uBlock Origin with lots of lists and NoScript. It's still a hassle because 1 out of 10 times something gets broken (usually, an embedded video or picture won't play or be shown), so I have to figure out what to block or unblock.

Last week, I decided to add Decentraleyes and Privacy Badger, and for two sites I had to disable one or the other.
 

security123

Level 12
Last week, I decided to add Decentraleyes
Decentraleyes doesn't give you any privacy inprovement.
Also the chance that websites will break is high with that addon and also it looks not very maintained.

And don't forget the needed permissions which the addon want
 

Terry Ganzi

Level 24
Verified
Decentraleyes doesn't give you any privacy inprovement.
Also the chance that websites will break is high with that addon and also it looks not very maintained.

And don't forget the needed permissions which the addon want
Now that is a lie,why are you trying to deceive people here.........Just why?

Websites have increasingly begun to rely much more on large third-parties for content delivery. Canceling requests for ads or trackers is usually without issue, however blocking actual content, not unexpectedly, breaks pages. The aim of this add-on is to cut out the middleman by providing lightning speed delivery of local (bundled) files to improve online privacy.

• Protects privacy by evading large delivery networks that claim to offer free services.
• Complements regular blockers such as uBlock Origin (recommended), Adblock Plus, et al.
• Works directly out of the box; absolutely no prior configuration required.

Note: Decentraleyes is no silver bullet, but it does prevent a lot of websites from making you send these kinds of requests. Ultimately, you can make Decentraleyes block requests for any missing CDN resources, too.

last update: February 16, 2020


Homepage:Decentraleyes | Local CDN Emulation
 

Lenny_Fox

Level 10
@monkeylove
Please post factual and verifiable information. Posting an opinion as a fact, makes it impossible to distinguish make believe from (alternative) facts. Not implying that you are not telling the truth, just want to understand and investigate the websites on which you encountered problems.

So ...please post which sites broke while using what blocklist or extension?[
 

security123

Level 12
Now that is a lie,why are you trying to deceive people here.........Just why?
I don't

Also to be fair, i personally use the addon for years.

Canceling requests for ads or trackers is usually without issue, however blocking actual content, not unexpectedly, breaks pages. The aim of this add-on is to cut out the middleman by providing lightning speed delivery of local (bundled) files to improve online privacy.
You still make a connection to the site, so one less doesn't solve the whole tracking.
Also Daniel Micay wrote some good stuff about the false sense of browser addons at all.
And websites move more and more to first-party, so they don't need any longer external stuff. This addon won't help then. Best example is the main post of this thread.

I'm not against improve privacy - i love privacy.
But you need to read about it a lot, and that's why i try to help people which believe some wrong facts.
In the end it's of course your choice.

last update: February 16, 2020
Where did you read this?
Last update: 2.0.13 - released 4 months ago: Releases · Thomas Rientjes / decentraleyes
last commit:
11 Oct, 2019 - 4 months ago: Commits · master · Thomas Rientjes / decentraleyes
 

Lenny_Fox

Level 10
@Terry Ganzi

Please read this DuckDuckGo Tracker Radar Exposes Hidden Tracking it explains in other words that old large blocklist (as your recommended uBlock uses) contain a lot of stale/dead rules. This is the reason Adguard and Opera's and Brave's build-in adblockers periodically clean up these rules.

DuckDuckGo said:
Crowd-sourced data is subject to the priorities and bias of the contributors. As a result, it's sometimes unclear why individual entries exist, their importance, whether they are still relevant, how to test them, and whether they break sites. Additionally, crowd-sourced block lists risk not being tested at scale, which can obscure many problems like the effect of adding a new rule, or rules that go stale as sites change.

By contrast, we periodically crawl a large set of top websites so that we can be both comprehensive and up-to-date. Across the entire crawl, we look at how often a resource is used in a third-party context, how often it sets cookies, how it uses browser APIs, and how likely those APIs are used to identify individual users (fingerprinting). Looking at the full data set in this manner also makes it easier to discover new techniques.
When you have different factual and verifiable information, feel free to post
 
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Terry Ganzi

Level 24
Verified
Author: Thomas Rientjes
Version: 2.0.13
Last Updated: February 16, 2020
Homepage: Decentraleyes | Local CDN Emulation
Rating: 274 reviews

Personal Support

Is your question not listed above, or do you have any other reason to contact me personally? You can always reach me at decentraleyes@protonmail.com. Bug reports or suggestions are highly welcome and I reply to every single email.

Feel free to use this public PGP key for encrypted communication.

> Full link to public PGP key: https://decentraleyes.org/3f774aff6d/public-key.txt

Are You Enjoying this Add-on?

Decentraleyes is, and will always be, free, but you can support its continued development by making a donation, by contributing on GitLab, or by spreading the word (which does wonders). Any help would be greatly appreciated!

• GitLab: Thomas Rientjes / decentraleyes
• Donate: Decentraleyes | Donation Methods
 
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