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It's just a False Positive so don't worry about it like others have already said; Xvirus Personal Firewall was probably recently updated which would explain the false positive detection, and since it had been updated it means the checksum hash was changed and clearly Avast didn't know about this update to re-white-list it.

Since the firewall is not making use of code signing authenticity (digital signature) it means the publisher cannot be white-listed which would prevent future FP detection's, so the white-list must remain based on the checksum hash or removal of the generic signature which caused the FP detection. :)

Xvirus Personal Firewall is completely safe and not even that bad, I like it also... try it out and see if you like it! ;)
 
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That's why, I use only signed with certificate software, To avoid complications.
If a program is digitally signed it doesn't make it any more genuine than software that isn't signed, and malware can still be digitally signed also... All the malware author needs is some money (they can get cheap code signing from around under £100), and if someone is developing malware which is actually sophisticated (therefore they have the skill-set to do so) then they will surely have money for this... That being said, Adware is usually digitally signed (and while it may not be under the nickname of malware ("malicious software"), it's still troublesome and will cause some pain one way or another (advertisements, browser hijacking, wasting your time to clean it off your system, etc.).

As @Dani Santos said, you'll be missing out on a lot of good software - there's some great software out there that isn't digitally signed and this may be for a number of reasons. As a main point, not all developers are providing software in exchange for money (free software) or may not have enough attention to actually afford a digital signature, or others don't put their money where their mouth is and they use their money for more useful resources, such as actual product development... thus providing better software.

At the end of the day, you should review each software on it's own individual basis; do the research and perform checks to make sure it's: clean and not malicious, and comes from a vendor who is trusted and respected and does not use any shady tactics (because shady tactics are unethical and a gray line and you can never really trust a company that does things unethically).

Thanks for reading :)
 
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i here put scrreencapture

As you can see, is a very small app resolution, I want to see this executable in full dimension covering the entire desktop and this does not allow it.
Omg that is so small on your screen :D :D :D :D :D

Well the solution would be for @Dani Santos to make it so it is re-sizable, or just check the resolution and re-size accordingly... Since it's .NET, he could use the Anchor property so the controls move to where they should be when it's resized ;) :)
 
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example of why you should not rely on unsigned programs. screen from vmware
See the part: "Gen:Heur" - the detection was not manually added by an analyst who believes that Xvirus Personal Firewall is malicious, however they have a generic signature (based on the bytes in the executable) which triggered the detection, which is done to help detect malware they have not yet seen.

Xvirus Personal Firewall is obviously known to Emsisoft, even two employees from Emsisoft are on this forum... Plus, if any Xvirus products were really not clean then it wouldn't be allowed on this forum, period.

Digital signatures are not an indicator as to whether a program is clean or not, it's there to help prevent people from pretending to provide software while claiming it's owned by someone who it isn't owned by. For example, if you made a fake version of Avast, then we would know it's not the genuine version just by checking the digital signature (unless the Avast certificate had been stolen and then used of course). It's essentially verification for the owner of the software - if you downloaded Xvirus Personal Firewall from the official website then you know it's the genuine copy, since the website was not breached and then hijacked by an attacker... Even then, you can do hash checksum checks to make sure it's the genuine copy.

You can rely on unsigned programs, it isn't about whether it's digitally signed or not... It's about if the program is genuinely clean or not. FP detection's happen all the time, not always with non-digitally-signed software, it's a natural thing with security software... ;)