Q&A Can’t decide if I like Windows VM or VMware Workstation better

LeMinhThanh

From LMT AntiMalware
Verified
Developer
Apr 11, 2020
204
I don't use VMware Workstation so I'll try to compare Windows Sandbox and VirtualBox:
  • Windows Sandbox: Everything required for this feature is included in Windows so you don't need to setup.
  • VirtualBox needs to be setup with an .iso file, .vhd file or something like that.
and
  • Every time Windows Sandbox runs, it's as clean as a brand-new installation of Windows and will clear itself when you shut it off. So it is very suitable if you want to quickly check if a software or website is safe or not.
  • VirtualBox is more robust and configurable, and persists after closing it or a reboot.
That's why I prefer VirtualBox
 

ZeePriest

Level 6
Jul 2, 2020
273
I don't use VMware Workstation so I'll try to compare Windows Sandbox and VirtualBox:
  • Windows Sandbox: Everything required for this feature is included in Windows so you don't need to setup.
  • VirtualBox needs to be setup with an .iso file, .vhd file or something like that.
and
  • Every time Windows Sandbox runs, it's as clean as a brand-new installation of Windows and will clear itself when you shut it off. So it is very suitable if you want to quickly check if a software or website is safe or not.
  • VirtualBox is more robust and configurable, and persists after closing it or a reboot.
That's why I prefer VirtualBox
Thanks for the explanation! I guess I'll be giving VirtualBox a try.
 

Stopspying

Level 14
Verified
Jan 21, 2018
624
I don't use Windows VM and have been put off from using VmWare products after Workstation caused me a lot of problems in January last year, when it crashed badly, leaving the machine unusable until I'd activated a backup. I agree with the comments of LeMinhThanh about VirtualBox, its my preferred VM and I'vce never had any problems with it. It seems far more intuitive to me than VMWare products.
 
F

ForgottenSeer 85179

Why adding extra attack surface? i already explain that in another post to you.
Or: Why using VM anyway?

Every time Windows Sandbox runs, it's as clean as a brand-new installation of Windows and will clear itself when you shut it off. So it is very suitable if you want to quickly check if a software or website is safe or not.
You can map an external folder to an internal folder to hold such data.

Another solution:
Instead of a Sandbox, use Hyper-V Snapshots instead. So, before you do any install or testing, create a snapshot of the VM, then when you are done, you can revert the VM back to the Snapshot!
 

rain2reign

Level 5
Jun 21, 2020
239
Though hyper-V and Windows Sandbox are great environments in my opinion (used it for many years). Enabling them can disable features from other software, since turning on the feature turns your OS to a hypervisor in itself. Some software such Ryzen Master to name one, don't like that and won't be able to start. If you use software that either can't run or can't stably run in a (virtualized) hypervisor environment I'd look into VirtualBox or one of the other competitors.

Especially since anything Windows, hyper-v included, are terribly documented many forget that it has the same native features as VirtualBox and VMware workstation. Sandbox should only be used as a testing area, and not as a VM testing environment. Sandbox only gives a clean sandbox environment that will delete itself upon closing. It's not a virtual machine environment, let alone customizable, like a real VM is.

Recently stepped over to VirtualBox, since some of the quality of life software I have come to use over the years aren't fully compatible with hyper-v enabled and won't run just a windows saying cant run with VBS enabled bla bla bla (Enabling Hyper-v turns your OS to a virtual hypervisor under the hood).
 
Last edited:

rain2reign

Level 5
Jun 21, 2020
239
Not every PC will meet the Windows Sandbox and Hyper-V requirements.
That is a good point.

Operating System Requirements​

The Hyper-V role can be enabled on these versions of Windows 10:
  • Windows 10 Enterprise
  • Windows 10 Pro
  • Windows 10 Education
The Hyper-V role cannot be installed on:
  • Windows 10 Home
  • Windows 10 Mobile
  • Windows 10 Mobile Enterprise
Windows 10 Home edition can be upgraded to Windows 10 Pro. To do so open up Settings > Update and Security > Activation. Here you can visit the store and purchase an upgrade.

Hardware Requirements​

Although this document does not provide a complete list of Hyper-V compatible hardware, the following items are necessary:
  • 64-bit Processor with Second Level Address Translation (SLAT).
  • CPU support for VM Monitor Mode Extension (VT-x on Intel CPU's).
  • Minimum of 4 GB memory. As virtual machines share memory with the Hyper-V host, you will need to provide enough memory to handle the expected virtual workload.
The following items will need to be enabled in the system BIOS:
  • Virtualization Technology - may have a different label depending on motherboard manufacturer.
  • Hardware Enforced Data Execution Prevention.
Source: MS docs Hyper-V requirements
Or if you want to look it up the quick way:
Open Powershell or Command prompt > type 'systeminfo' (without quotations) > scroll down to 'Hyper-V requirements'
If all checks say yes as well as the not running any Home edition of Windows 10, you can run it. Not taking into consideration on whether your RAM can handle it though.
 
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