SECURITY: Complete CyberPanther Computer Security Configuration 2021

Last updated
Apr 23, 2021
About
Personal, primary device
Additional PC users
Not shared with other users
Desktop OS
Windows 10
OS edition
Pro
Login security
    • Password-less (PIN, Biometric, Face)
Primary sign-in
Microsoft account
Primary user
Admin user - Full permissions
Security updates
Automatic - allow all types of updates
Windows UAC
Default - notify when programs attempt to make changes
Network firewall
Third-party router
Real-time protection
Norton 360 Deluxe
Software firewall
Provided by a third-party security vendor. Refer to 'Real-time protection' for details.
Custom RTP, Firewall and OS settings
Boot-time protection: aggressive mode
SONAR: aggressive mode
Blocking traffic for little-known apps: aggressive mode
Malware testing
No malware samples
Periodic security scanners
EEK, Trend Micro House Call, F-secure online scanner
Secure DNS
Adguard DNS and Express VPN DNS Servers
VPN
Express VPN
Password manager
LastPass
Browsers, Search and Addons
Edge (Chromium):
Norton Safe Web
Adguard
LastPass

Firefox:
Norton Safe Web
Adguard
LastPass
Maintenance and Cleaning
Norton Performance
Personal Files & Photos backup
Acronis and Google Drive
Personal backup routine
Automatic (scheduled)
Device recovery & backup
Acronis and Norton Backup
Device backup routine
Automatic (scheduled)
PC activity
  1. Working from home. 
  2. Browsing the web. 
  3. Emails. 
  4. Shopping. 
  5. Banking. 
  6. Multimedia. 
  7. Streaming. 
Computer specs
HP Spectre X360
Operating system: Windows 10 Pro 64
Processor, graphics & memory:
Intel® Core™ i7-1165G7 (up to 4.7 GHz, 12 MB L3 cache, 4 cores) + Intel® Iris® Xe Graphics + 16 GB(onboard)
Display: 13.5" diagonal, WUXGA+ (1920 x 1280), IPS, Touch, edge-to-edge glass, micro-edge, BrightView, anti-reflection, 400 nits
Storage: 512 GB PCIe® NVMe™ M.2 SSD
Battery: 4-cell, 66 Wh Li-ion polymer
Personal changelog
UAC implemented to Always notify
Configured windows 10 native exploit protection
Changed Real-time Protection to G Data Internet Security
Feedback Response

Most critical feedback

cruelsister

Level 38
Verified
Trusted
Content Creator
Apr 13, 2013
2,749
One thing that you need to evaluate is the utility of using UAC. Far too many malware strains will be immune to any action by UAC (like Mespinoza ransomware), or use the old dll hijack method:

Bypassing Windows 10 UAC with mock folders and DLL hijacking

like the WastedLocker ransomware. The latter is more disconcerting as why would a user deny the popup for Microsoft's own winsat.exe (which begins the malicious cascade)?

So although there is nothing wrong in enabling UAC, one must ask if it really adds anything to security.
 

Gandalf_The_Grey

Level 50
Verified
Trusted
Content Creator
Apr 24, 2016
3,906
One thing that you need to evaluate is the utility of using UAC. Far too many malware strains will be immune to any action by UAC (like Mespinoza ransomware), or use the old dll hijack method:

Bypassing Windows 10 UAC with mock folders and DLL hijacking

like the WastedLocker ransomware. The latter is more disconcerting as why would a user deny the popup for Microsoft's own winsat.exe (which begins the malicious cascade)?

So although there is nothing wrong in enabling UAC, one must ask if it really adds anything to security.
And if you use UAC set it as recommended in the linked article to "Always Notify".
Gebert's straightforward mitigation advice to prevent UAC bypass attacks is setting UAC to "Always Notify." Doing so will always show the user UAC prompts before high-risk applications are executed.
Edit: learn to read before posting, allready posted by @Back3 (y)
 

CyberPanther

Level 6
Oct 1, 2019
279

CyberPanther

Level 6
Oct 1, 2019
279
One thing that you need to evaluate is the utility of using UAC. Far too many malware strains will be immune to any action by UAC (like Mespinoza ransomware), or use the old dll hijack method:

Bypassing Windows 10 UAC with mock folders and DLL hijacking

like the WastedLocker ransomware. The latter is more disconcerting as why would a user deny the popup for Microsoft's own winsat.exe (which begins the malicious cascade)?

So although there is nothing wrong in enabling UAC, one must ask if it really adds anything to security.
I am reading about UAC on Microsoft Documents and shall enable it soon.
Change User Access Control setting
 
F

ForgottenSeer 85179

Thanks for the tip. I will configure windows 10 native exploit protection. I am reading two articles found on Microsoft Documents:
Apply mitigations to help prevent attacks through vulnerabilities
Turn on exploit protection to help mitigate against attacks
You can also take a look at
 
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