Serious Discussion Everything about Windows 12 - Release date and Rumors

CyberTech

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Is Microsoft going to release a new version of Windows, maybe called Windows 12, in 2024? The company is as usual tight lipped when it comes to new product releases, which means that information about the next Windows is coming from third-party sources and internal leaks at the moment.

Intel Chief Financial Officer David Zinser mentioned a "Windows refresh" that is coming in 2024 in a conversation with Citi. Discovered by PCGamer, Zinser said in the conversation: "We actually think '24 is going to be a pretty good year for client, in particular, because of the Windows refresh. And we still think that the installed base is pretty old and does require a refresh and we think next year may be the start of that, given the Windows catalyst. So we're optimistic about how things will play out beginning in '24."

Microsoft released Windows 11 in 2021 as the successor of Windows 10. Windows 10 is running out of support in 2025. Microsoft raised system requirements when it released Windows 11, which blocks millions of devices from being upgraded to it.

Windows refresh suggests that Microsoft could release a new operating system or a refresh of Windows 11, similarly to how Windows 8.1 is seen as a refresh of Windows 8. While Windows 12 is not mentioned specifically, anything but a major new Windows release would probably not affect Intel's revenue predictions this much.

Windows Central notes that the term refresh was also used to describe Windows 11 before its reveal in 2021. The site claims that development of this next version of Windows is "in full swing" and that its source suggest that "most of the work" could be complete by mid 2024.

The next version of Windows will focus on integrating AI and cloud services deeper into the operating system. There will also be some design and interface changes, but nothing is fixed at this stage.

Whether Windows 11 development is going to end at that point or not is unclear. Microsoft could push Windows 12 as an update for Windows 11, similarly to a feature update. In any event, Microsoft guarantees 2 years of updates for any Windows 11 release. This would give organizations and users enough time to make the upgrade decision, if Microsoft decides to put Windows 11 in the backseat.

2024 will be an interesting year for Windows, if the next version of Windows is really released in the year. Microsoft has about a year left, if true. It will be interesting to see if Microsoft plans to release early copies as Insider builds for testing.

Windows users who are disheartened by recent developments, especially the integration of more and more promotions and ads in Windows 11, may not like the general direction of development, as it promises more of the same.

Still, it is too early to judge an operating system that has not been officially confirmed by Microsoft.

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oldschool

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we still think that the installed base is pretty old and does require a refresh and we think next year may be the start of that, given the Windows catalyst.
Is he referring to Win32 code base? It seems they've been talking about gutting it for years and still nothing. :unsure::rolleyes:
 

silversurfer

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Microsoft might just have confirmed Windows (12) release alongside leaked Office 2024 images
On the Twitter post by techosaurusrex about the Office 2024 Preview where the user also mentions the "New Windows Client", the official Windows Insider Twitter (X) handle responded with the comment "The future is bright indeed":

 

CyberTech

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Earlier today, we reported about the first official mention of "Windows 11 24H2" and also speculated on how this could affect the supposed launch of the next Windows version, also called Windows '12' casually.

In case you haven't been keeping up with Windows 12 leaks and rumors, the next-gen OS launch is purportedly scheduled to happen sometime in 2024 if previous reports are to be believed, and according to a new report, such rumors were indeed correct. Taiwan's Commercial Times (CTEE) reports that Microsoft will be releasing Windows (12) in June of 2024 alongside a wide variety and range of AI-based PCs. This sounds very close to Computex 2024.

Although there are no direct quotes provided, the publication attributes this to recent statements made by Quanta Chairman Lin Baili and Acer Chairman and CEO Chen Junsheng at the recent Taiwan Medical Technology Exhibition.

While you are probably familiar with Acer as it is a fairly popular PC manufacturer in the US, UK, Canada, and most parts of the world, Quanta Computer is mainly based in Taiwan and also makes PCs, like notebooks, among other electronics hardware.

The rest
 

Ink

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Windows 12 may not be happening after all, or at least that seems to be the way the rumor mill is suddenly tilting – and Microsoft is also changing how it’ll update its desktop OS in the future, we’re told.

This fresh info comes from Zac Bowden of Windows Central, a well-known leaker on all things Microsoft.

Bowden tells us that the next version of Windows (codenamed Hudson Valley) will be highly AI-focused and Microsoft is planning to launch it in September or October 2024 – but the final name is a marketing decision that hasn’t yet been made.

However, the leaker claims that sources inside Microsoft are doubtful as to whether it’ll be Windows 12.
So, if Microsoft goes the route of making Hudson Valley an all-new release called Windows 12, what’s the danger of fragmentation referred to here?

Well, if Windows 12 came out next year, we’d have a bunch of folks leaping to that OS, a bunch still on Windows 11, and a whole load of users still running Windows 10 (stuck behind a hardware upgrade barrier in many cases – either because they don’t have TPM functionality on their PC, or their CPU is too old).
 

silversurfer

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Trendforce, a research firm and market analyst, says Microsoft is about to raise minimum hardware requirements for so-called AI PCs that will rely heavily on features powered by AI. Trendforce claims 16GB is now a baseline for AI computers running the next-generation Windows scheduled for the second half of 2024.
Citing their own sources, Tom's Hardware adds to the report, claiming that in addition to 16GB of RAM, AI PCs would need at least 40 TOPS (performance measure for computational power) to ensure snappy on-device performance and justify the "AI PC" badge.
 

Dave Russo

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vtqhtr413

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vtqhtr413

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Microsoft AI Tour: Everything you need to know​

The series of conferences is meant for AI enthusiasts, tech entrepreneurs, developers, and decision-makers, while Microsoft promises AI will create new opportunities for people everywhere.

There were a couple of conferences within this tour that were held in 2023, but the rest of them will be held in 2024, from January to April. April is also the month Microsoft is reportedly unveiling the upcoming AI-powered Windows, so it will be just in time.
 

Captain Holly

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I just hope I can still keep the AI/chat gpt/Bing bard whatever it is turned off no matter what version of Windows it is. I have AI copilot turned off with a registry entry now and I don't use Edge. If I can keep it that way I will stay on Windows. If not I will make a permanent switch to Linux. I don't want anything to do with AI.

C.H.
 

silversurfer

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Qualcomm has become the latest tech company to signal that Microsoft’s Windows 12 is set to arrive in the coming months.

Qualcomm’s CEO Cristiano Amon tipped a potential launch date while discussing the company’s own upcoming product, the Snapdragon X Elite, a new Arm-based chip for PCs that promises to shake up the laptop market.

Windows 12 wasn't mentioned by name. But in an earnings call, Amon said the Snapdragon X Elite is slated to arrive in “mid-2024” when Microsoft unleashes the "next version of Windows."
 

vtqhtr413

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Microsoft has officially confirmed what we reported over the past few weeks: Windows 12 isn’t happening in 2024, and the next version of Windows is “Windows 11 version 24H2”, codenamed Hudson Valley.

Windows Latest had spotted references to “Windows 11 24H2” in support documents, and Microsoft has now officially confirmed the update. In a new blog post announcing Sudo for Windows, Microsoft noted that testers in the Dev/Canary channels will notice “Windows 11 version 24H2” in Settings, Winver and other places.
 

NormanF

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If the upgrade path to Windows 12 is steep, its easier to switch to Linux.

People aren't going to invest in new PCs just to run Windows 12.

I expect Tiny12 would be released on its codebase to allow it to run on older PCs.
 
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Captain Holly

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I used FF in Linux Mint, it worked ok and was updated regularly. I wanted to add a secondary browser as a backup and ran into problems. Tried Vivaldi first, it was ok but Pandora will not work In it, it gives errors that it can't play the song. Tried Brave and no extensions will install. Tried Edge and it worked ok but it wanted me to sign in which is what I used Linux to avoid in the first place. I think the Vivaldi and Brave problems are because I can't manually update them in Linux. I tried googling for solutions but nothing I found fixed either problem. I may just put my daily driver laptop back on Windows and deal with the whack a mole updates the best I can.

C.H.
 
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Digmor Crusher

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If the upgrade path to Windows 12 is steep, its easier to switch to Linux.

People aren't going to invest in new PCs just to run Windows 12.

I expect Tiny12 would be released on its codebase to allow it to run on older PCs.
Very few of the general populace would switch to Linux, I would guess 1%. Most don't even know what Linux is.
 

Jonny Quest

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Very few of the general populace would switch to Linux, I would guess 1%. Most don't even know what Linux is.
I tend to agree with that. For the majority who have been using Windows for years, it would not be an easy switch to go to Linux, more like uncomfortable, to much of a learning curve.

A lot of Windows 10 users who couldn't migrate to 11 due to not meeting the hardware, and TPM platform requirements, will probably just run 10 (those devices) into the ground. Others may consider they've been on Windows 10 since 2015 and think it's time for a PC upgrade anyway. If we're running 11, there aren't any new PC hardware requirements to upgrade to 12, unless I haven't read the articles?
 
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roger_m

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If the upgrade path to Windows 12 is steep
Most likely it won't be. The hardware requirements for Windows 11are basically the same as for Windows 10, aside from dropping support for 32 bit CPUs and it is faster, even on old unsupported hardware. Microsoft just decided to limit the hardware you can install it on, unless you use their workaround. So I presume the hardware requirements for Windows 12 will be similar.
 

Captain Holly

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Very few of the general populace would switch to Linux, I would guess 1%. Most don't even know what Linux is.
Agreed. Linux is not Windows. People say that sometimes when you ask for help in the Linux forums. I tried working with Linux Mint off and on since about March last year but kept going back to Windows. I can say now that I am done with Linux, it is just too convoluted and strange and hard to find/figure out solutions to problems with it. The only way I would go back to Linux is if MS makes it impossible to turn off or delete their AI copilot gimmick in Windows 12 or whatever they decide to call it. Yesterday I swapped out the hard drive in my laptop for a new 1TB ssd and reinstalled Windows 11. Last month I put in a 16GB ram card. Laptop works fine now but it did take some time to turn off/delete the bloatware. Now that it's done I hope to just use the laptop. I just want MS to leave well enough alone.

C.H.
 

Fido

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@Captain Holly: I'm surprised you found Linux Mint "too convoluted and strange and hard to find/figure out solutions to problems with it". I found it very easy to move from Windows to Mint but maybe it depends on what you programs you use with it. I think the average user would find Linux Mint easier than Windows but I agree that most will never try it.
 
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nicolaasjan

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Microsoft just decided to limit the hardware you can install it on, unless you use their workaround.
Something has changed in that regard. :(
With Windows 11 24H2 Microsoft is tightening the screws, leaving even more PCs officially incompatible with the OS. A newly discovered change in hardware requirements reveals that core files now require a new CPU instruction, POPCNT. If your hardware doesn't support it, the OS will not boot, and there is no way to bypass this change.
(emphasis mine)

The instruction requires a processor that supports SSE4.2 or SSE4a.

Many PCs won't be able to run Windows 11 24H2 due to a new POPCNT requirement
 
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