Jack

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Digital Trends said:
Browser wars: Google Chrome has overtaken Microsoft Internet Explorer as the world's most popular browser, according to data from Statcounter. But IE remains the #1 Web portal in the U.S.

Google’s Chrome browser has officially surpassed Microsoft Internet Explore (and everything else) to become the most-used browser on the global Internet, reports Jon Russell at The Next Web (via Global Nerdy’s Joe deVilla). The crowning statistics come courtesy of Statcounter, whose data shows that Chrome passed IE during the week of May 7 through 13. Mozilla’s Firefox remains solidly in third place.

As of last week, Chrome holds 32.76 percent of worldwide browser usage, Statcounter’s numbers show, giving it just a slight edge above Internet Explorer, which has 31.96 percent market share globally. Firefox has held steady at just over 25 percent. Apple’s Safari holds nearly 14 percent, putting it in fourth place. And Opera remains the innovative underdog at a mere 1.75 percent market share.

These numbers shift drastically when you look at U.S. data only. Here in The States, IE remains king, with nearly 38 percent of all users. Chrome is in second, with about 23 percent of the market, while Firefox remains a close third, with 22.5 percent.

Read more: http://www.digitaltrends.com/web/google-chrome-edges-past-internet-explorer-to-take-top-browser-spot/
 

Spirit

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I just don't know how ie can ever match mozilla or chrome,Maybe the benefit to ie is that its a default browser in windows and come pre install and many of user dont know/or care to install new browser.Although ie9 has much better security and speed but i always prefer other browser then ie.
Thanks Jack for read.
 

Jack

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Saint said:
Although ie9 has much better security and speed but i always prefer other browser then ie.
Google done an amazing job at securing Chrome... not only from exploits but also protecting the user from malicious pages or downloads......
Right now , Chrome is 2 steps above Firefox or Internet Explorer when it comes to security........
Here are just 2 examples , that show Chrome detecting 0 day malware using just it's built in code.

1. Chrome can detect a malicious embedded code into a hacked page or infected website.I've seen it detect a malicious frame on hacked website long before the webmaster known that the site was infected


2. Chrome copied Internet Explorer download reputation system and now offers a similar feature, more specific this browser will warn the user if a file is very new and has suspicious characteristics.... And even better id does a great job at actually detecting malicious files...... Works great and you can easily test it with some malicious links... I'm sure it will do a great job... :)




As far as speed goes.... Well, comparing IE with Chrome it's like saying that a regular car is faster than a F1 car:p

Without any doubt Chrome deserves to be on the first place when it comes to browsers.....

Very interesting article to read : http://malwaretips.com/Thread-Did-Google-Pull-a-Fast-One-on-Firefox-and-Safari-Users
 

Jack

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Seems like Microsoft doesn't agree with the StatCounter statistics... And I think this time they have a very good point.
PCMAG said:
Chrome Browser Usage Artificially Boosted

Tech blogs were abuzz yesterday over the news that Google Chrome had topped Internet Explorer in global browser market share. But the source for this story was StatCounter, which Microsoft has accused of using a somewhat flawed methodology. The other major traffic measurement site, Net Applications, reports IE as having a comfortable 54 percent of browser usage this month, with Firefox in second place with 20.20 percent and Chrome in third with 18.85 percent.

How can the results be so different? While StatCounter reported Chrome as being on top last week, even that traffic measuring site has IE back on top this week. But the real problem is just what StatCounter counts: pre-rendered Web pages that the user never saw. When a Chrome user types in a Google search, Chrome pre-loads an invisible tab in the background. StatCounter still counts this as a page view. By comparison, Net Applications removes these artificial results, as the company explained on its site.

The Microsoft blog post also pointed out that Net Applications, unlike StatCounter, weights results by a country's Internet-using population. Since these measuring companies depend on the number of sites using their service, this can be skewed by how many such installations exist in a given country. For example, in StatCounter's data, Turkey is the number-two Internet-using country, and its results are based on that, while CIA data shows Turkey actually to be the fifteenth largest Internet-using country.

Another perhaps even more important factor is that StatCounter doesn't count by unique browsers, but rather by sheer traffic volume. The volume can be artificially boosted by bots that generate huge amounts of Web traffic.

Read more: http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2404714,00.asp
Related : http://windowsteamblog.com/ie/b/ie/archive/2012/03/18/understanding-browser-usage-share-data.aspx
 
I

illumination

Jack said:
Seems like Microsoft doesn't agree with the StatCounter statistics... And I think this time they have a very good point.
PCMAG said:
Chrome Browser Usage Artificially Boosted

Tech blogs were abuzz yesterday over the news that Google Chrome had topped Internet Explorer in global browser market share. But the source for this story was StatCounter, which Microsoft has accused of using a somewhat flawed methodology. The other major traffic measurement site, Net Applications, reports IE as having a comfortable 54 percent of browser usage this month, with Firefox in second place with 20.20 percent and Chrome in third with 18.85 percent.

How can the results be so different? While StatCounter reported Chrome as being on top last week, even that traffic measuring site has IE back on top this week. But the real problem is just what StatCounter counts: pre-rendered Web pages that the user never saw. When a Chrome user types in a Google search, Chrome pre-loads an invisible tab in the background. StatCounter still counts this as a page view. By comparison, Net Applications removes these artificial results, as the company explained on its site.

The Microsoft blog post also pointed out that Net Applications, unlike StatCounter, weights results by a country's Internet-using population. Since these measuring companies depend on the number of sites using their service, this can be skewed by how many such installations exist in a given country. For example, in StatCounter's data, Turkey is the number-two Internet-using country, and its results are based on that, while CIA data shows Turkey actually to be the fifteenth largest Internet-using country.

Another perhaps even more important factor is that StatCounter doesn't count by unique browsers, but rather by sheer traffic volume. The volume can be artificially boosted by bots that generate huge amounts of Web traffic.

Read more: http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2404714,00.asp
Related : http://windowsteamblog.com/ie/b/ie/archive/2012/03/18/understanding-browser-usage-share-data.aspx
After reading this article, would have to agree that Microsoft has a good point also.. Counting pre-rendered Web pages, that others remove from the results. :rolleyes:
I do agree, that Chrome has stepped up their game in security though, and is a very good Browser.