ebocious

Level 4
Okay, thanks! I have Nod32 on this gaming pc and was either going to do Tech Fortress or Cruel Comodo with it.
According to this it's three. ( fourth question in the faq)
Good catch! The phone tech told me limit 5 machines for McAfee, 2 for Private WiFi (VPN), and 1 for Tech Fortress. Of course, these guys were from India, and either consulting a knowledge base or asking a supervisor for every question I asked. I wonder if that includes the $3.99 a la carte version, or just the advantage plans?
 

Nightwalker

Level 18
Verified
Content Creator
Kaspersky Internet Security would be my choice, it has everything that one needs to protect a machine with top notch quality modules (antivirus/firewall/adblocker/behavior blocker/HIPS/Whitelist feature/webcam protection/bank protection/top class phishing protection/anti-spam/software updater/anti exploit/vulnerability scanner/a not so good VPN and much more).
 

ebocious

Level 4
For me that app is currently Hard Configurator.
VoodooShield and CruelComodo are also very nice but require a bit more support from me for my family members.
And don't forget Hard Configurator has the great support of @Andy Ful here. (y)
Not trying to challenge you, but Cruel Comodo requires more support than H_C? I'm assuming because your family members have a hard time finding the icon in Notification Area to disable Auto Containment?
 

ebocious

Level 4
No, but they don't need to.
They perform only simple tasks on their pc like browse, banking and e-mail.
It is the most quiet set and forget solution nowadays for me.
If needed I provide support by visiting them or a teamviewer session, but it's almost never needed.
Right. If you disable all alerts on the User Interface screen in Comodo, you get the same thing: silence. And better yet, if you ever need to install something via TeamViewer, you don't have to reboot to toggle security. Plus, you can disable Auto Containment for 15, 30, or 60 minutes, so protection resumes automatically in case you forget. Cruel Comodo's got everything. Discuss - If you could pick only one program for protection.

P.S.: AppGuard does these things too, but of course it's not free.
 
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Gandalf_The_Grey

Level 22
Verified
Right. If you disable all alerts on the User Interface screen in Comodo, you get the same thing: silence. And better yet, if you ever need to install something via TeamViewer, you don't have to reboot to toggle security. Plus, you can disable Auto Containment for 15, 30, or 60 minutes, so protection resumes automatically in case you forget. Cruel Comodo's got everything. Discuss - If you could pick only one program for protection.

P.S.: AppGuard does these things too, but of course it's not free.
Thank you for this great discussion (y)
Been testing VoodooShield lately, but that is not what I want.
Liked the idea of WhitelistCloud (a recent beta from VoodooShield).
Will test CruelComodo again.
It's always nice to have options for a good free security config.
 

bribon77

Level 29
Verified
We talking of the most secure, not the less targetted.

Linux is extremely unsafe compared to Windows, doesn't even come with in-built Firewall.
Every Linux user knows that he has to activate the Firewall, and if Linux has an Iptable firewall by default.
Well, the question is about a program, not a system.
But, leaving the thread, how many Linux users ask for help because they are infected?
I have not seen it in MT or in any Forum where I have been registered.
 

Slyguy

Level 43
We talking of the most secure, not the less targetted.

Linux is extremely unsafe compared to Windows, doesn't even come with in-built Firewall.
Local Host is 100% correct here, and shatters the invulnerability myth of Linux.

Linux can and does have issues related to malware. Even more concerning is the fact that the issues it does have offer extreme privilege escalation and much more intrusive compromises. In 2019 so far, Windows actually isn't the OS with the most compromises/CVE's. (tip - it's Linux) Even more concerning is the fact that Linux development and patch cycles are way slower than Microsoft and Kernal releases are even more infrequent resulting in a significant window of compromise.

Can Linux be made more secure? Reasonably so provided the person is experienced working with it and they use the proper distro, and make some specific changes. Windows is more targeted, but Linux isn't necessarily the panacea. If Linux had an installed user base of 70% of the PC's on the market you'd learn really fast all of the fun things Linux does wrong.