Nightwalker

Level 18
Verified
Content Creator
I dont think this vulnerability is a big deal, but still I recommend to disable the "inject script" for performance reasons, in my experience this option has a huge impact on browsing speed and CPU usage.

While you are there you could disable the background rootkit scan and the encrypted connection scanning options.
 
A study conducted by AV Comparatives in 2014 showed that the main free and non-antivirus antivirus programs keep track of user activity and send our personal data to the company.
All these antiviruses except eScan and Fortinet assign to the user's computer a unique identification number which is transmitted to the company of the antivirus in question;
All these antiviruses except AhnLab, Emsisoft, and Vipre transmit to the company the addresses of the websites visited by the user. Some of these antiviruses only transmit harmful internet addresses, others even non-harmful ones. Furthermore, by exploiting the unique identification number assigned to the computer, it is likely that the antivirus company can obtain a user's internet browsing history for that computer;
Some of the antiviruses studied by AV Comparatives send to the company information such as the name of the user's computer, the name of the Windows user, the language and the processes and programs running;
When the antivirus detects a suspicious file it transmits it to the company in such a way that it is examined to check for the presence of malware. This "normal" behavior, however, apparently is not limited only to executable files but to any other type of file, so the antivirus could also send the user's personal files to the company such as sensitive documents, images and so on. Avast, Fortinet, Kaspersky Lab, Symantec and Vipre are confirmed to behave in this way, while AVG, ESET, McAfee, Microsoft, Sophos, Trend Micro and Webroot have not left any statements (and this leaves one to think about).
From what came out of a study by AV Comparative (Anti-Virus Comparative) regarding the transmission of data by internet security software.
The most well-known free and non-virus antivirus programs, first interrogated (AV Comparatives submitted a series of questions to the software companies about this) and then analyzed by AV Comparatives (some answers provided by the companies did not coincide with the results of the analyzes carried out), such as AhnLab, Avast, AVG, AVIRA, Bitdefender, BullGuard, Emsisoft, eScan, ESET, Fortinet, F-Secure, G DATA, Kaspersky Lab, McAfee, Microsoft, Panda, Sophos, Symantec, Trend Micro, Vipre, and Webroot not really respect user privacy.
All these antiviruses except eScan and Fortinet assign to the user's computer a unique identification number which is transmitted to the company of the antivirus in question;
All these antiviruses except AhnLab, Emsisoft, and Vipre transmit to the company the addresses of the websites visited by the user. Some of these antiviruses only transmit harmful internet addresses, others even non-harmful ones. Furthermore, by exploiting the unique identification number assigned to the computer, it is likely that the antivirus company can obtain a user's internet browsing history for that computer;
Some of the antiviruses studied by AV Comparatives send to the company information such as the name of the user's computer, the name of the Windows user, the language and the processes and programs running;
When the antivirus detects a suspicious file it transmits it to the company in such a way that it is examined to check for the presence of malware. This "normal" behavior, however, apparently is not limited only to executable files but to any other type of file, so the antivirus could also send the user's personal files to the company such as sensitive documents, images and so on. Avast, Fortinet, Kaspersky Lab, Symantec and Vipre are confirmed to behave in this way, while AVG, ESET, McAfee, Microsoft, Sophos, Trend Micro and Webroot have not left any statements (and this leaves one to think about).
From the study of AV Comparatives it emerges that the antiviruses that invade less the privacy of the users are due to payment, that is:
AhnLab which sends the company a minimum amount of data (information on the antivirus program, the unique identification number of the computer, the version of the operating system in use and the hash of the files) but does not include the sending of the sites visited, of the personal documents, executable files and other personal information of the user.
Emsisoft which in case of malicious send to the company the suspicious executable file in question but does not send the visited sites or documents or other personal files.

The pdf file conducted by Av-Comparatives is available online in English
 

Burrito

Level 22
Verified
From the study of AV Comparatives it emerges that the antiviruses that invade less the privacy of the users are due to payment..
Many want to ignore this... but this has been shown in different ways both large and small. A paid AV product has a dramatically smaller chance of monetizing your usage in one way or another. Unless somebody has the economic need to run a free AV, I always recommend a paid product.
 

Slyguy

Level 43
Many want to ignore this... but this has been shown in different ways both large and small. A paid AV product has a dramatically smaller chance of monetizing your usage in one way or another. Unless somebody has the economic need to run a free AV, I always recommend a paid product.
Admiral Burrito is of course correct here.

Free, they make money off of you. Paid, they make money off of your money. Free is going to be a bad idea in most cases in life. If I could pay money for a top end, well developed, non-spying web browser I'd do it. This whole generation of panhandlers seems to always want everything to be free.