MacDefender

Level 12
Verified
It's a big data collector, basically. It tracks almost all the system. 🤣😅


Yeah it’s no surprise that the best behavior blockers are the ones that see the most of what’s going on across all your processes.

The unsettling part is that these days, many behavior blockers go hand-in-hand with cloud based crowdsourcing. Kaspersky definitely takes that to a fairly unique level in terms of how much detail is collected with regards to what processes do on your machine.
 

Paul.R

Level 17
Verified
At least they don't sell your data or sleep in same bed with Secret Service like Norton, Mc Afee, Trend Micro and ZoneAlarm.

Plus in 13+ years from using Kaspersky, Putin never called me...
 

MacDefender

Level 12
Verified
At least they don't sell your data or sleep in same bed with Secret Service like Norton, Mc Afee, Trend Micro and ZoneAlarm.

Plus in 13+ years from using Kaspersky, Putin never called me...
Legally speaking though Kaspersky AO USA is under the exact same legal requirement as Norton and other US companies to respond to legal subpoenas. So if you’re under investigation and they can get a court-ordered subpoena, Kaspersky likely has a great deal of information on the activities that go on in your computer.

I have to assume they are just quietly complying with such orders, since fighting them will result in a public record and court cases.
 

fabiobr

Level 10
Verified
Yeah it’s no surprise that the best behavior blockers are the ones that see the most of what’s going on across all your processes.

The unsettling part is that these days, many behavior blockers go hand-in-hand with cloud based crowdsourcing. Kaspersky definitely takes that to a fairly unique level in terms of how much detail is collected with regards to what processes do on your machine.

The eye that sees everything.
system-watcher-Kaspersky.png


But, I think the main discussion here is: Are we agree to trade privacy over security? Do we trust this or that security firm? Do we agree to give much information about us to that unique firm so they give back to us protection against many groups of hackers or even another firms?

I think these are questions we have to made these days.
 

fabiobr

Level 10
Verified
Legally speaking though Kaspersky AO USA is under the exact same legal requirement as Norton and other US companies to respond to legal subpoenas. So if you’re under investigation and they can get a court-ordered subpoena, Kaspersky likely has a great deal of information on the activities that go on in your computer.

I have to assume they are just quietly complying with such orders, since fighting them will result in a public record and court cases.
They will not lose a big market like US or another country just to fight against the law/state because of one or another client.

It's logic. Look at Trump and TikTok.
 

MacDefender

Level 12
Verified
But, I think the main discussion here is: Are we agree to trade privacy over security? Do we trust this or that security firm? Do we agree to give much information about us to that unique firm so they give back to us protection against many groups of hackers or even another firms?

I think these are questions we have to made these days.

Yes I totally agree. That is the question, and in the case of Kaspersky, they certainly do provide a compelling product in KSW/KSN and most people should fear zero-day malware more than they should fear the NSA/CIA/FBI.

But only the customer knows what they need. If your goal is to hide your activities from the US government or any other government, or you have information you don't want Kaspersky to see, I would not recommend a cloud based protection product.

They will not lose a big market like US or another country just to fight against the law/state because of one or another client.

It's logic. Look at Trump and TikTok.

It's never a profitable route to fight the government you hope to do business under. I don't expect Kaspersky, Norton, or anyone else attempt to fight the US government for someone like me who paid $30 for 5 licenses.