tapoo

Level 4
Verified
DNS Benchmark result for me....

.
here i tested as in DNS Benchmark
OpenDNS = OpenDNS, LLC
Google DNS = Google Incorporated,
Comodo DNS = Level 3 Communication and Peak3
Norton DNS = Symantec Corporation
Sendori DNS = Dynamic network service
My ISP DNS = National Internet Backbone
.

DNS Jumper result for me



from these results which DNS would be best for me?
never used other DNS service seriously, so limited knowledge... suggestion would be very helpful..... :)
 

Gnosis

New Member
This is something that I have not tried in a while, so I am interested to see how this thread develops. Thanks for posting. Replies will come shortly.
 
P

Plexx

This should help you: http://www.grc.com/dns/benchmark-faq.htm

In short I would change between your NIB and Google one.

Symantec onwards take a bit longer to resolve and receive "response".
 
D

Deleted member 178

Depend if for speed or security, personally i am using Norton and it works well & fast.
 

NSG001

Level 16
Verified
What works best for you tapoo.
I have no issues with Comodo Secure DNS.
Suggest you test a few.
 

tapoo

Level 4
Verified
anyone using google DNS? in this test, its looks like google performs better in my area..
 

Spawn

Administrator
Verified
Staff member
Any reasons you plan to switch to an alternate DNS? Are you looking for security / performance improvements?

Might I suggest check their Privacy Policy before switching.
 

NSG001

Level 16
Verified
tapoo said:
anyone using google DNS? in this test, its looks like google performs better in my area..
Google DNS is certainly a reliable option i have used theirs previously.

As Earth has asked why are you considering the change?
For speed/ping or security :huh:
 

HeffeD

New Member
NSG001 said:
As Earth has asked why are you considering the change?
For speed/ping or security :huh:
I was just about to ask the same thing.

Why do you want to switch?

If it's for security, I prefer to rely on my security software for that. Blacklisting site URL's is an impossible task. The sites come and go so quickly that by the time it gets on the list, the site is no longer available.

If it's speed, you can't make a decision based on a single DNS benchmark. To make any sort of useful decision, you'll need to run benchmarks several times a day (during peak and non-peak traffic hours) over the course of a few weeks and average the results. This will give you a pretty good idea of the DNS's actual performance. If you were watching a car race and wanted to see which car was the fastest, you wouldn't just take a single speedometer reading over the course of the race would you?

Or is is content filtering? Not all DNS services offer content filtering. If this is a concern, you'll want to check those features out as well.
 
N

Nige_40

HeffeD said:
NSG001 said:
As Earth has asked why are you considering the change?
For speed/ping or security :huh:
I was just about to ask the same thing.

Why do you want to switch?

If it's for security, I prefer to rely on my security software for that. Blacklisting site URL's is an impossible task. The sites come and go so quickly that by the time it gets on the list, the site is no longer available.

If it's speed, you can't make a decision based on a single DNS benchmark. To make any sort of useful decision, you'll need to run benchmarks several times a day (during peak and non-peak traffic hours) over the course of a few weeks and average the results. This will give you a pretty good idea of the DNS's actual performance. If you were watching a car race and wanted to see which car was the fastest, you wouldn't just take a single speedometer reading over the course of the race would you?

Or is is content filtering? Not all DNS services offer content filtering. If this is a concern, you'll want to check those features out as well.
I agree with Earth & HeffeD

But for me I use my ISP DNS with build in Homesafe Virus checker plus I use Webfilter Pro as well so I'm getting good speed and security.
 

tapoo

Level 4
Verified
still does't facing much problem, but i face low speed problem some-days specially in afternoon/ evening, sometimes its continues up to night, takes long time for opening page, but its not everyday problem, is it because of ISP DNS ?

just tested with DNS benchmark in morning 6AM, showing both ISP DNS in top position, symantech 3rd, Sendori 4th, Google 5th
 

Ramblin

New Member
Hi Tapoo, a few weeks ago my ISP DNS was messy, speed was fine but pages were not opening as they should. I changed DNS to Norton's and my problem went away.

Bo
 

MrExplorer

Level 28
Verified
ZOU1 said:
This is something that I have not tried in a while, so I am interested to see how this thread develops. Thanks for posting. Replies will come shortly.
i also don't use DNS please suggest the best one i should use & what are advantages of DNS.
 

HeffeD

New Member
Unknown said:
i also don't use DNS please suggest the best one i should use & what are advantages of DNS.
You do use DNS if you use the internet.

DNS is a bit of a "phone book" for internet users. People are better at remembering actual words instead of strings of numbers, so a name like MalwareTips is easier to understand than the sites IP address.

However, the IP address is what is needed to route your traffic to/from the appropriate server. This is where DNS comes in. When you tell your computer you want to visit MalwareTips, it contacts your ISP's DNS to find out what the IP address is. It keeps a local copy of this address so your next visit to the site will be quicker.

What advantages do third-party DNS services offer?

Well, unless your ISP's DNS is really bad, they rarely offer better speed. In fact, before recursive DNS was a reality, they could actually be a bit slower.

DNS generally only has an effect on web browsing, not throughput. (download speed) Because once the IP lookup has been done, DNS is out of the equation. However, DNS can affect your download speed in a roundabout way.

You see, your ISP knows where you are located. As such, you are generally routed to much closer content delivery servers (CDN) for downloads, or basic webpage mirror usage. This generally results in a higher download speed because there is less distance between you and the server you are downloading from. Assuming that the server is not overloaded, you can generally assume your download speed will be a little bit better if you are closer to the place the download is coming from.

With a third-party service, chances are pretty good the DNS requests made to the service are going to try to route you to a CDN closer to the third-party servers, which may not actually be all that close to you.

If the third-party service allows recursion however, they can forward a portion of the IP address given to you by your ISP along with the DNS request. It's not enough to identify you if you're worried about privacy, it's just enough to give your general location in hopes that you'll be connected to closer CDN servers.

So if it's not speed, then why use a third-party service?

Many third-party services offer malicious site blacklisting. Meaning, if you try to go to a known malicious site, the service will just not connect you to the site and display a message about why it isn't connecting you. I personally don't feel this is much of a "plus", because malicious sites come and go so rapidly, that it's very likely that the site is already gone by the time it makes it to the blacklist.

Some services like OpenDNS also allow a form of protection in that it can intercept obvious misspellings. Many sites count on a user misspelling a domain name to get traffic. So typing Goggle.com takes you to a drastically different place than Google.com. OpenDNS would be aware that most likely you wanted to go to Google.com and would correct your misspelling.

Many third-party services also offer content blocking. So you can set it up to not allow your computer to connect to sites with adult content. Some will even allow you to create your own personal blacklist. If you don't like Facebook, tell the service that you don't want your computer making connections to Facebook. :)

That's the basics, so you can hopefully determine whether or not using a third-party DNS service is for you. :)