boredog

Level 9
I just noticed another browser I had never heard about before and can get 32 bit version.

Vivaldi 1.3 for Linux. if someone is willing to explain how to install it?
 
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0136d0n

Level 1
Vivaldi 1.3 for Linux. if someone is willing to explain how to install it?
Download it here.
Open terminal, browse to the directory containing the .deb file you've just downloaded. In my case:
Code:
cd Downloads
-> hit Enter, then
Code:
sudo dpkg -i the-file-name.deb
-> hit Enter
Enter your password -> hit Enter & done.
This is off-topic. Further question about Vivaldi you should post in its own thread.
 
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boredog

Level 9
thanks I will give that a try and get back to you.


update: ok I have to admit the cd Downloads threw me off since that is a windows command but I was able to use file manager to go to downloads folder and the run terminal from there.

worked great. nice and fast and hope she likes it. thanks so much.
 
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TheSuperGeek

Level 2
Download it here.
Open terminal, browse to the directory containing the .deb file you've just downloaded. In my case:
Code:
cd Downloads
-> hit Enter, then
Code:
sudo dpkg -i the-file-name.deb
-> hit Enter
Enter your password -> hit Enter & done.
I don't agree with this : you install the package but you don't check depedencies...
I think it would be better if you do that :
1) Open a terminal and go in the folder containing the .deb with cd command (if you want to know more about it, type man cd )
2) Type sudo dpkg -i the_downloaded_file.deb (install the .deb package)
3) type sudo apt-get -f install (install dependencies)
Then it will be ok :)
 

Vasudev

Level 29
Verified
I hate Chrome but love chromium. My goto browser would be Firefox for sheer number of customisations available in the app store. If your PC has enough horsepower use Kubuntu or else Xubuntu or Lubuntu which are fairly lightweight. One thing I like about Linux Distros is, if you don't like one, you can try several different distros which perhaps suits you.
 
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Windows_Security

Level 23
Verified
Trusted
Content Creator
As a Windows user I managed to sandbox Chromium with Firejail and AppArmor on top of its own Sandbox in Xubuntu :)

I decided for Solus with budgie desktop, because most Ubuntu based distro's could not handle an AMD GPU (A4 5300) which was used by an older relative.

On Solus FireJail is also available (with its GUI frontend), but I choose for Chromium (in stead of Firefox + Firejail) because Chromium launches a lot faster (Chromium with its build in sandbox lanches < 1 second, while Firefox with firejail takes > 3 seconds).
 

vaccineboy

Level 1
Adblocker for browser and that's it. FW is not even that important because ports in Linux are closed by default and are only opened by your own installed softwares. The best policy is probably to try to stick to the distro's official repo and, if 3rd-party repos are must, well-known repos.
 
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Black Wings

Level 3
For security in linux the first thing is to activate the firewall
sudo enable ufw
According to the distros, you should install Gufw (manage the firewall in graphical environment)
sudo apt-get install gufw
The rules are created in a very simple way, because looking for the program, the firewall will create the rules automatically.
You have to use extensions for a healthier navigation, as in Windows and to run programs in a virtualized environment, use firejail
sudo apt-get install firejail
sudo apt-get install firetools


That's it, you don't need anything else. ;)
 
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robin hood

Level 4
Verified
Any new recommendations or comments regarding security on Linux mint 19 cinnamon x32?(use ABP,malwarebytes extension for FF and Chromium).
 
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shmu26

Level 82
Verified
Trusted
Content Creator
turned ON in Public.Any Av for linux or not need?(sorry for bad english)
AFAIK there is no real-time AV protection for Linux. You can install Clam and ClamTK (it is the GUI), if you want, in order to do periodic scans. It is optional.
Most important thing is to be careful of sources for software you install. Anything in the official repository is safe. Anything else, you need to be cautious. Often it will require you to add a PPA (third-party repository for a specific software), and that means you are vulnerable to anything that happens to the PPA, because it will feed updates to your system.